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Is beer in Ireland bad?

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8,204 ✭✭✭partyguinness


    What? :D

    No you’re not, you’re just drinking each glass quicker. Would help not have it go warm though.


    TBH I have drank in Germany and Holland many times- I even have Dutch in laws and been to a Dutch wedding.


    I have never managed to get pissed in either country and drank away all night in a civilised manner. Yeah sure if I really wanted to make a dick of myself I could have made more of an effort I suppose.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    I still wonder what process is used to filter Guinness and Smithwicks since 2018? Is it top secret?


  • Posts: 7,712 ✭✭✭[Deleted User]


    TBH I have drank in Germany and Holland many times- I even have Dutch in laws and been to a Dutch wedding.


    I have never managed to get pissed in either country and drank away all night in a civilised manner. Yeah sure if I really wanted to make a dick of myself I could have made more of an effort I suppose.

    God you’re a right lad, though I have done this many times too, making a dick of yourself isn’t a prerequisite in backward little Ireland.
    So, are you putting yours down to drinking the same amount but from smaller glasses or just drinking less? Because if it’s the latter I’d say someone could have told you that without ever being special enough to go to Holland.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,999 ✭✭✭✭Esel


    saabsaab wrote: »
    I still wonder what process is used to filter Guinness and Smithwicks since 2018? Is it top secret?

    Look at the Wikipedia Isinglass page. Not a secret there.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isinglass

    "A beer-fining agent that is suitable for vegetarians is Irish moss, a type of red algae containing the polymer chemical carrageenan."

    I'm not saying this is definitely what Guinness use, but I'd say it is the most likely answer to your question.

    Not your ornery onager



  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 67,460 Mod ✭✭✭✭L1011


    Esel wrote: »
    Look at the Wikipedia Isinglass page. Not a secret there.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isinglass

    "A beer-fining agent that is suitable for vegetarians is Irish moss, a type of red algae containing the polymer chemical carrageenan."

    I'm not saying this is definitely what Guinness use, but I'd say it is the most likely answer to your question.

    Biofine or synthetic gelatin is probably more likely.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    Esel wrote: »
    Look at the Wikipedia Isinglass page. Not a secret there.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isinglass

    "A beer-fining agent that is suitable for vegetarians is Irish moss, a type of red algae containing the polymer chemical carrageenan."

    I'm not saying this is definitely what Guinness use, but I'd say it is the most likely answer to your question.


    Why don't they want to say so then?


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,999 ✭✭✭✭Esel


    saabsaab wrote: »
    Why don't they want to say so then?
    Ah, here - how would I know that?

    Why are you so interested in this?

    Not your ornery onager



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    Esel wrote: »
    Ah, here - how would I know that?

    Why are you so interested in this?


    I wasn't saying that you would necessarily know unless of course you worked for Guinness/Smithwicks.



    I would like to know what change was made to remove isinglass from the process because I want to know what I am drinking now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,976 ✭✭✭✭Peregrinus


    saabsaab wrote: »
    I would like to know what change was made to remove isinglass from the process because I want to know what I am drinking now.
    The fining agent is removed after doing its work. Whether it is biofine, synthetic gelatin or Irish moss, you're not drinking any of it. Just like, in the past, you weren't drinking isinglass.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,149 ✭✭✭✭elperello


    saabsaab wrote: »
    I wasn't saying that you would necessarily know unless of course you worked for Guinness/Smithwicks.



    I would like to know what change was made to remove isinglass from the process because I want to know what I am drinking now.

    Perhaps if you dropped an email to Guinness/Diageo the information might be forthcoming. If you do please report back.
    Peregrinus wrote: »
    The fining agent is removed after doing its work. Whether it is biofine, synthetic gelatin or Irish moss, you're not drinking any of it. Just like, in the past, you weren't drinking isinglass.

    Correct and it's not something that would keep me awake at night. As far as I can see the vegans objections were based on the fact that animal products were used during the production process rather than that they were drinking same.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    elperello wrote: »
    Perhaps if you dropped an email to Guinness/Diageo the information might be forthcoming. If you do please report back.

    Doubt that, saw online that a reporter wasn't given an answer to this a while back.

    Correct and it's not something that would keep me awake at night. As far as I can see the vegans objections were based on the fact that animal products were used during the production process rather than that they were drinking same.


    No, vegans were also worried that traces were in the final product. probably true of whatever is being used now too. Why the secrecy?


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,149 ✭✭✭✭elperello


    Doubt that, saw online that a reporter wasn't given an answer to this a while back.


    That's interesting have you a link to that. I don't like the idea of them refusing to answer a query from the media.
    saabsaab wrote: »
    No, vegans were also worried that traces were in the final product. probably true of whatever is being used now too. Why the secrecy?

    Sorry I thought they were worried about the use of animal products.
    I'd imagine any trace would be as small as previous but as you say we can't be sure.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    See link below. Article quote
    'Guinness Beer claims they do not use high fructose corn syrup any longer, but refuses to disclose ingredient affidavits or full of list of ingredients.'




    https://foodbabe.com/the-shocking-ingredients-in-beer/comment-page-14/



    I also saw in another article that they weren't forthcoming with the new fining method information. Not just Guinness other manufacturers are slow to release this info by the way.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    https://nypost.com/2015/11/03/guinness-will-remove-fish-bladders-from-beer-to-go-totally-vegan/

    Also IT article..

    'Now it seems to have hit upon a viable alternative. Without specifying what the process involves, the company has announced plans for a new vegan-friendly filtration system at its St James’s Gate brewery in Dublin.

    The annoucement comes in the wake of a longstanding campaign by vegans and two online petitions .

    According to Guinness-owner Diageo, the new system will be up and running by late 2016, with the revamped brew in pubs and off-licences soon after.

    A spokesman said the product would taste the same but would be vegan-friendly. “Isinglass has been used widely as a means filtration in the brewing industry for decades,” he told The Irish Times.

    “However, because of its use we do not label Guinness as suitable for vegetarians, and have been looking for an alternative solution for some time.”

    “We are now pleased to have identified a new process and are re-investing in a new, state-of-art filtration system at St James’s Gate, which once in place will remove isinglass from the filtration process,” he said.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    As far as I can see Murphy's still used 'isinglass' as used for hundred of years.


  • Moderators, Music Moderators Posts: 11,770 Mod ✭✭✭✭iamstop


    balor69 wrote: »
    loads of great irish beers the country is full of fantastic craft breweries something for every pallet

    I found that on my last trip back I noticed a lot of selection, but not much variety.

    Seems every brewery has a stout, an IPA, a Red and maybe a Pilsner of Lager but there was not much variety between them.
    Where I am here in Canada there about 10 breweries in the city and a huge variety of beers in each category. I think some of them are in a friendly competition to come up with the strangest but tastiest variation on a particular type.
    Perhaps there is not as easy access to a large variety of quality hops and other ingredients in Ireland?


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,943 ✭✭✭✭the purple tin


    Something that can affect your hangover is whether you are standing or sitting on a nigh out. Even more so if you are getting long in the tooth.
    I noticed myself that if it's a really busy night and I am standing for maybe 3 to 5 hours my energy levels will be sh1t the nexy day compared to if I had got a seat.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    Something that can affect your hangover is whether you are standing or sitting on a nigh out. Even more so if you are getting long in the tooth.
    I noticed myself that if it's a really busy night and I am standing for maybe 3 to 5 hours my energy levels will be sh1t the nexy day compared to if I had got a seat.


    I prefer to stand and talk (maybe sometimes too much) feel better next day too. I don't generally like sitting unless those I'm with want to sit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 905 ✭✭✭m8


    Is the Irish Pub as we know it fading away?

    Change is seen to be a good thing until we have it all changed and we forever look back at how good it used to be. :)



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    I think so. Just started drinking inside again after the pandemic. It's OK but not the same somehow and I seem to be getting more hangovers!



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  • Registered Users Posts: 905 ✭✭✭m8


    Yes I feel that same but was putting it down to age. I used to love going for a pint on a Friday night now I just don't bother.



  • Registered Users Posts: 6 nick.kohl


    not bad at all



  • Registered Users Posts: 20,929 ✭✭✭✭Ash.J.Williams


    The beers you mention (Heineken) etc are the one direction of beer ie easily accessible to any gobshite and watered down to appeal to the masses



  • Registered Users Posts: 20,929 ✭✭✭✭Ash.J.Williams


    Ya feckin eejit


    there is no such thing as Guinness dregs from James gate


    whoever told you that heard 2nd hand about “spent grain” and couldn’t understand the process and then told you his theory on it .



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab




  • Registered Users Posts: 20,929 ✭✭✭✭Ash.J.Williams


    You don’t get dregs in a food manufacturing plant , all effluent get’s dealt with like any other factory, but the used grain makes it’s way into animal feed I think


    like it isn’t a bunch of lads with pipes in a room filling kegs spilling beer all over the place 😂😂



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,729 ✭✭✭saabsaab


    Ok. What about the dregs returns from the pubs and what happens to the effluent? Down the sewer?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,705 ✭✭✭BeardySi


    Late to the party, but hops is bloody expensive - particularly the strongest varieties used for IPA's.


    Lagers and especially stouts use very little hops and they're generally less expensive varieties. I strongly doubt any leaf or plug hops ever goes near your Coors etc, but extracts which would be cheaper again at very large volumes.


    When I was homebrewing, the whole hop load for a stout would cost about £1.50 for 20L, but you could be easily 5-10 times that for an IPA - particularly a dry-hopped one.



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