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Send in the Clowns - BAC 10K Challenge

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  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Ran it again this morning as part of a longer hill run and didn't walk! :)
    Fair dues to you! Don't know how you could do that climb again after doing it in a race yesterday. I did my long run today, and jaysus, it felt very bloody long. Even at a much slower pace than my normal long run, and on a route mostly flat as a pool table.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Today: 20 mile slow run, from Howth to Killiney. Was very sore this morning (particularly my left shin) so wasn't entirely positive about heading out on this long run, but had already committed to a running buddy that I'd do it, so left the house at 8:30am to get the Dart to Howth. Arrived in Howth at 10am, to a chilly wind; a wind that was to slow us down for the first few miles until we turned the corner at Fairview.

    Great sea vistas and a large amount of shin-friendly grass and tarmacadam paths saw us crossing from the Northside to the South with the sun coming out to warm our souls. We hit the beach at Sandymount for a very pleasant run on the sand as far as Booterstown, occasionally glancing across the bay at Howth in amazement. When you can see 10 miles behind you, it's an impressive visual distance, but from Sandymount, you can also see the 10 miles that you have ahead of you, which looks equally as impressive :(.

    Blackrock, Dun Laoghaire, and Dalkey all passed without event, but as we passed Teddy's Ice cream shop in Sandycove the temptation to sit down and have a '99 was nearly over-whelming. The final climb up over Vico Road was quite painful, but with only a mile to go, and the rugby starting in 90 minutes, there was no holding us back.

    Route rating: 3.5/5
    Mostly flat as a pancake (except for Dalkey-Killiney), with good paths most of the way, with occasional concrete. Need to have good weather as the entire route is very exposed, and strong winds would be a killer. Sunday Darts are sh1te, so check a timetable first! Wonderful views, as long as you don't mind the psychological shock of seeing the distance you have yet to travel!

    Summary: 20 miles in just under 3 hours, @5:35/km, HR=132 (70%).
    Still regret not stopping for the ice-cream and flake!


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,479 ✭✭✭Peckham


    Sounds like a nice run - would love to try it myself some time, and as you say the distance is very visual.

    What route do you take through city centre? Through Fairview, down East Wall Road and over the East Link? Run that myself but in the other direction on way from south to north on way home from work. The stretch from Ringsend to Fairview is pretty grim!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,492 ✭✭✭Woddle


    Great run Krusty especially after the race, I did it a few weeks back after a xc race but only managed 15/16, no way I could have done the 20 well done.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,983 ✭✭✭TheRoadRunner


    yeah great stuff. Its so hard to do a long run after a hard race.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Peckham wrote: »
    Sounds like a nice run - would love to try it myself some time, and as you say the distance is very visual.

    What route do you take through city centre? Through Fairview, down East Wall Road and over the East Link? Run that myself but in the other direction on way from south to north on way home from work. The stretch from Ringsend to Fairview is pretty grim!
    Hi Peckham, unfortunately I snapped my USB ANT stick (for uploading routes to the web) in two, so can't upload routes until I get a new one, but essentially, that was it. At Fariview we turned and went over Alfie Byrne Road, over the toll bridge (on Pigeon House Road). It is pretty grim, but is alot worse if you head out to Poolbeg! Also, I did 20.01miles, to avoid all accusations. :D

    Congrats on your return to full fitness by the way. You must be delighted to finally be over the injury.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Woddle wrote: »
    Great run Krusty especially after the race, I did it a few weeks back after a xc race but only managed 15/16, no way I could have done the 20 well done.
    Thanks Woddle. My running buddy is aiming for 3:40 in Connemara, so thankfully his long run pace is a good bit slower than I would normally run a long run, which helped greatly (a good bit slower than my recovery runs). All the aches and pains dissolved after the first 8 miles. It's good to get 3 hours on my feet, as that's close to what I'll be doing in Connemara (pacing him). Think I even managed a suntan during the run!


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    yeah great stuff. Its so hard to do a long run after a hard race.
    Thanks TheRoadRunner. Probably more down to foolish pride (didn't want to cancel) than anything, but glad to have it done. Only one more 20 miler before Connemara, where I hope to record my personal worst time. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,441 ✭✭✭Slogger Jogger


    Great running KC. I don't feel too bad (for my poor body) after doing 20 miles today too. Well done.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Feeling a bit tired the last two days, so, glad to read in my P&D training diary that it is a recovery week. I have been running around 8-10 miles more per week than the training plan requires, but that is to make sure I am up to distance for the Connemarathon coming up in around 5 weeks time. I had toyed with switching from the 'up to 55 miles per week' plan to the 'up to 70 miles per week' plan, as I've been running 55 miles per week for the guts of a month now, with more than three months to go to the real target (Edinburgh), but decided against it, as I can use the extra mileage for non-training runs, like IMRA races, trail runs, running with friends who run at a lesser pace, or more recovery runs.

    Yesterday: Hals weights, followed by core strength exercises. Have increased the weight of the dumbbells to around 3kg each, doing around 12 repetitions. Probably a complete light-weight, but haven't done any weights before. Also increased the core strength stuff to 12 repetitions (from 10). Softly, softly, catchee monkey! Still really struggling with the bicycle crunches and the hip lifts.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Today: 8 Miles with 10 x 100m strides. Anyone have any suggestions how you can approximate 100 metres without having to look at the watch (and change it to metric?). I'm not great at gauging distances, so have been doing approximately 60-80 strides, but could be way off.

    Anyway, today's beautiful spring day was off-set by tiredness from the weekend, so didn't really enjoy the run. More a case of getting it done, and ticking the boxes. But I did tick the box. Looking forward to tomorrow's recovery run, if the fine weather keeps up. Will definitely wear lighter clothes which may have contributed to the difficulty.

    Summary: 8.5 miles with 10 strides, in 1 hour, @7:09/Mile, HR=155 (81%)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,492 ✭✭✭Woddle


    It depends what way you do them, last year at every 0.93 I would do my strides, so after 0.93 = strides, 1.93 = srides, 2.93 = strides, 100 meters is close to 0.07, and its handy to set the garmin to lap every mile so your not looking at the watch doing them, your just waiting for the beep so you can stop
    Or if you do it this way do your 8/10 miles and on the way home outside the house just go up and down the same stretch of path picking out the same marker each time. Outside my house, its the ballyboden traffic lights to the phone box close to Buglers pub.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Thanks. I'll give your first suggestion a go, as I don't live anywhere near Ballyboden. :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,441 ✭✭✭Slogger Jogger


    Hey KC didn't realise you were doing Edinburgh too. We can definitely hook up for training runs in advance of that, enjoy the taper together and a beer over there :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Yep, it's one of the two big goals this year: Edinburgh - 3:07:30, and Berlin - 3:xx:xx. Looking forward to the period after Connemara, when the real training begins. I'm only messin' at the moment. :)

    Today: 5 miles on the grass in the park at aerobic/easy pace, @7:32/mile, in 40 mins. HR=Still screwed up (around 142=72%).


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,441 ✭✭✭Slogger Jogger


    Looks like you were doing a similar pattern around Shangannagh to me last night :). Lots of runners out yesterday evening. You know Spring is coming.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    ..and sometimes it gives it all back.. But rarely both in the same workout.

    Headed out this afternoon on an 8 mile aerobic run, with the idea of possibly completing my weekend's medium long run, if I felt up to it (step-back week). Decided on an old favourite route with a steady climb for a couple of miles, then a nice down-hill, followed by a flat return to home. At the top of the hill-climb, I was wrecked, but had put in some pretty good times on the climb. Recovered very quickly and enjoyed the subsequent down-hill, so at mile 7 decided I would stretch the run to the 13 miles. It was great to see some miles on the flat/uphill at planned race pace, with my heart rate staying comfortably below 155.

    So, finished the 13.1 miles in 1:34, which is a decent chunk off my PB for the distance (official - 1:44, but have done 1:38 during a marathon). So very pleased. Overall the 13 miles was at planned marathon pace (for Edinburgh), so a great confidence booster. I feel just fine afterwards, and now have a couple of easy days of recovery runs ahead of me, before one last high mileage week for Connemara.

    Summary: 13.1 Ninja-shaped miles in 1:34, @7:11/mile, HR=152 (80%).


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,608 ✭✭✭donothoponpop


    great run Krusty, nice distance, nice pace, nice hills! All that hill running will stand you in good stead for IMRA. Enjoy your couple of easy days now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Thanks Donothoponpop. It was after reading your log, that the idea popped into my mind of getting the medium-long run out of the way and having a nice easy couple of days. Not much difference between running 8 and 13 miles anyway (in terms of getting ready etc).


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,441 ✭✭✭Slogger Jogger


    Fabulous running KC, again.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Previous days 6 Mile recovery run, on the grass in the park.

    Today: 16 mile medium long run, with one decent hill climb, some lovely views, and a nasty head-wind for the last couple of miles. Familiar roads pieced together into a different route made for a lovely run, with sunshine... real sunshine! Today's schedule was for..well, nothing really. But having rested up yesterday, and with the sun making an appearance, I couldn't resist.

    Summary: 16 miles in 2:04, @7:36/mile, HR=146 (76%).

    4 Weeks to Connemara
    98 days to Edinburgh


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Yesterday:
    Hal Higdons weights, followed by core strength stuff.
    Football - 90 mins +warm up/down - covered somewhere between 4 and 5 miles (depending on which tool you use). Took a few knocks during the game, so definitely giving it up now until after Connemara. :(

    Oh, and on the subject of the great debate, football is definitely more physically brutal than running (sprint/stop, jumping, turning, tackling), it's just not as physically exhausting as running hard for the same duration.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Today:
    Schedule called for 10 miles with 5 miles at 15k-1/2 marathon pace. Got around 200 metres from the house and realized that last night's swollen ankle (following a tackle) was most definitely not gone, and that the shin pain (from a different tackle) was not going to let me run fast at all. So decided to do Thursday's 11 mile aerobic run, albeit at a slower pace. Frustrating, but has helped me make a decision (finally) about continuing playing the footie, until after the marathons.

    Anyway, 11 miles at around 8min/mile, HR=139.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Spent two days living it up in Madrid, so no running, just booze, food, and other unhealthy pursuts. Managed to get a quick 5 miles in today, just to make sure that the legs still work. Hoping to do the Trooperstown IMRA race tomorrow, but the shins/ankles are still quite sore after football on Monday, so having some doubts. Is it better to participate and perform poorly, or not participate at all?

    Summary: 5.3 miles in 38 mins @7:19/mile, HR=143


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    IMRA Trooperstown Race

    *Warning, it took me longer to write this report than it did to run the race*

    From my previous post, I was unsure about how I would perform in this race, and given this doubt, unsure whether or not I sure turn up at all. But being the third Boards AC runner, and having had a couple of rest days in Madrid (though to be fair, there was very little rest involved) I felt I should give it a go anyway. It was nice to meet the Boardsies before the race, for a bit of banter, then it was time to line-up.

    This time, a different strategy - I decided I would start somewhere around where I finished the previous race, so I lined-up with around 20-30 runners ahead of me (having finished 26th in my previous race). Slogger Jogger and Donothoponpop were lined up just ahead of me, looking poised and alert, like pitbulls waiting for the command to attack. :D The race director went through his speech and I only half listened, the other half of me was listening out for the subtle change in the runners that would mark the start of the race. As it turns out, I should have paid more attention, as unexpected hill after hill threatened to wrack my body with lactic acid. For anyone new to IMRA races, either pre-run the course, or listen to the race director!

    Ready, steady, go - we were off. As the race kicked off, I was very surprised at the pace. Sure, we were on a gentle ascent, but these guys in the leading pack were really pushing it. I stayed at the back of the pack and it soon calmed down. I realized that the initial push was the jostle for positions before the narrow path and climb made passing very difficult. I was quite content to hold up the rear of the first pack, but was soon surprised that some runners started drifting off the pace (may have started too far up the field) and I managed to get by a few of them. A kilometer or two of gentle (relatively-speaking!) climb, and I picked off a couple of runners, when suddenly, there in front of me was an orange beacon, that was to guide me the entire journey home. I couldn't believe my eyes. Donothoponpop was but a mere 200 metres ahead of me. Took me a while to catch up with him, as there were two runners between us, and I didn't want to tire myself just trying to catch dnhop, so I stuck to my own pace that eventually saw me drawing level.

    This is where my race report and Donothoponpop's divert into separate realities. In my race report you won't find any mention of words like 'battle' or 'race'. I decided to leverage from his experience and try to stick to him as long as I could. I was hoping that this might reduce the chances that I might take a wrong turn (sometimes in these races, because of the landscape, you can find yourself with no-one visible ahead of you), but also take advantage of his pacing up the hills. It's true that occasionally I found a extra spurt of speed or took a slightly better line that found me ahead of him, but what remained in my mind was that if I could stick to him, I would have a good finish.

    After 4 Kms of climbing I was indeed shouting/praying/anticipating the first bit of downhill, to catch my breath, and eventually it came, only to be replaced with another climb. As I headed towards the cairn that marked the end of the start of the first downhill, I was surprised to see a couple of runners ahead of us take a decidedly more 'direct' route past the cairn. Choice of path was an interesting variable during this section, as you could choose between the tractor/4x4 ruts, clip along atop the root-tangling heather, or take your chances with the sticky mud.

    As I had anticipated, Dnhop soon took his rightful place as we headed towards Trooperstown Hill, and I took a moment to enjoy some of the breath-taking (!) views. Soon, another hill-climb, and at this stage, I was caving. The body was telling me that I shouldn't be challenging these hills at this pace, and in a soul-destroying moment of weakness, I gave in to my body's demands, and slowed to a walking climb, after seeing a runner ahead of us do the same. As a small pack behind us drew close, I picked up the pace again, and was surprised to see how quickly I could catch up with orange beacon, while leaving the trailing pack behind, so while not a positive attitude, at least it wasn't costing me too much.

    Downhill on the scree, and thankfully, not as bad as I had been led to expect. I managed to stick within 100 metres of 'orange', as we both picked off a runner, who had previously been ahead of us, stopped to pee, and probably used too much energy reclaiming his former position. Down, down, down towards the finish line, I was praying to see the red cones that marked the end of my run, but with every twist in the road, another section that needed to be over-come. I had one ambition, and that was to finish behind Donothoponpop, but my legs were filling with lactic acid, and were begging me to slow down. I looked back, and saw a glimpse of a white T-Shirt, and that was enough to give me the final push to keep going to the finish line.

    Still waiting for the official results, but as far as I'm concerned, Donothoponpop +1 is result enough for me. :D

    Summary: 6.4 Hilly miles in 49:11, @7:35/mile, HR=173 (91%).


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,492 ✭✭✭Woddle


    IMRA Trooperstown Race





    This is where my race report and Donothoponpop's divert into separate realities. In my race report you won't find any mention of words like 'battle' or 'race'. I decided to leverage from his experience and try to stick to him as long as I could. I was hoping that this might reduce the chances that I might take a wrong turn

    Did he not get lost in the last one or the one before that :D
    Well done Krusty all this IMRA will make connemara look like a stroll on the beach.

    Great running


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,441 ✭✭✭Slogger Jogger


    Great running and great report. Avg HR of 173 :eek: I was scared of similar results so choose not to wear the HR belt :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Woddle wrote:
    Did he not get lost in the last one or the one before that
    Well done Krusty all this IMRA will make connemara look like a stroll on the beach.
    Great running
    That may be true, but in these here hills of his, the Mountain man is king!

    I'm regretting Connemara more and more with every decent run I do. Though I think it may just be my vanity.

    Bloke: "How did the Marathon go?"
    Krusty: "It went really great. I ran it 20 minutes slower than my personal best, but the scenery was fantastic".
    If I can get over the vanity, I'll be fine.:o


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,493 ✭✭✭✭Krusty_Clown


    Great running and great report. Avg HR of 173 :eek: I was scared of similar results so choose not to wear the HR belt :)
    Yeah, it's pretty high alright, but I'm somewhat relieved, as I missed my LT session this week, so I think that this run took care of it quite nicely. :) I think my 20 mile run tomorrow will depend on the Ireland result. :) Might just put it off until Monday!

    Congrats on your great finish by the way. Your stats for the winter league must place you very high in the overall league table.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,608 ✭✭✭donothoponpop


    That may be true, but in these here hills of his, the Mountain man is king!

    You were very strong on the uphills, stronger than me. I may have the edge on the descent, but who knows how long that will last;)

    Still waiting on the results, but make no mistake, judging by the guys I beat today (and you beat them too), we had a great race. All your marathon training will put you in great stead for the longer Summer Championship races.


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