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11-07-2019, 19:02   #211
blergh
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Originally Posted by El Tarangu View Post
https://www.independent.ie/business/...-37581386.html

Not to put too fine a point on it, but the current sanitation set-up in rural areas' involves people literally befouling one another's drinking water, so I'm not sure how 'eco friendly' that is.
I'm going to admit that I'm a lot more conscious of what I put down my drain since I moved somewhere that it all ends up filtering into the soil in my back garden.

Modern bicocycle wastewater systems are pretty good if they work right... Not sure why I pay taxes for other people to be connected to mains wastewater systems while I'm also liable if my private one malfunctions, but there you go.
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11-07-2019, 19:07   #212
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I'm wondering why you're continuing with this clearly ridiculous line of reasoning. Dublin's canal cordon revealed tat 70% of people enter the centre by sustainable mode, public transport, walking and cycling. If those people lived in rural areas they'd all drive long distances to work, i.e. an unsustainable mode. Why is this hard for you to understand? More and more people are living in cities now, therfore reducing their emissions from transport.
Yeah that's all well and good for Dublin but in the other cities people still have to use their cars to get from A to B because the public transport is totally inadequate.

So it's not just those terrible rural people using cars.

When there is a luas in every city then you might have a valid point to make.
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11-07-2019, 20:13   #213
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Originally Posted by El Tarangu View Post
https://www.independent.ie/business/farming/forestry-enviro/environment/agriculture-and-septic-tanks-source-of-dangerous-e-coli-found-in-40pc-of-water-sites-37581386.html
Not to put too fine a point on it, but the current sanitation set-up in rural areas' involves people literally befouling one another's drinking water, so I'm not sure how 'eco friendly' that is.
Yeah we've heard loads already about how the rednecks are responsible for destroying the planet. So not referring to rural issues for a change. Plenty of well maintained septic tanks exist imo.

As for the **** discharged into Dublin Bay and the like in other urban areas - from previous.

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'It has been estimated that raw sewage from the equivalent of 86,000 people is pumped (from municipal sewage disposal infastructure) into Irish waterways every day. Raw sewage which is discharged daily to surface water in 44 places around Ireland. In Cork harbour alone 5,000 tonnes of untreated sewage is pumped into the sea every day, although reportedly this volume was halved last year
But you're right - its not a competition. Just a pity that we still have claims that cities are somehow 'eco friendly' (sic),

Last edited by gozunda; 11-07-2019 at 21:02.
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11-07-2019, 21:16   #214
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Originally Posted by Galwayguy35 View Post
Yeah that's all well and good for Dublin but in the other cities people still have to use their cars to get from A to B because the public transport is totally inadequate.

So it's not just those terrible rural people using cars.

When there is a luas in every city then you might have a valid point to make.
You're right. Badly designed cities and urban sprawl cause this but they are still easier to sevice and supply clean energy to. One thing I think the Brits do well is zoning land like the lake districts etc.. unlike here where there is roads, houses and fields in every direction.
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11-07-2019, 21:58   #215
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https://news.colgate.edu/scene/2014/...n-legends.html

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If you wanted to reduce your consumption of natural resources, where would you move in the United States today: a city, a suburb, or a rural area?

Shannon Sweeney ’07 asked this question in a mail survey as part of her senior honors thesis at Colgate. The largest percentage of respondents said “a rural area,” and the smallest, “a city” — which is actually the correct answer.

The smaller living and yard spaces, less dependence on automobiles, and more efficient use of infrastructure (roads, utility connections) among urban dwellers mean a lower per capita consumption of key resources from land and water to energy and materials. The misconception involves thinking about where the greatest total resource consumption occurs, rather than measuring levels of demand by population.



Cities have much larger “ecological footprints” than rural areas. True or false?

In absolute terms, true, but an absolute measure is seriously misleading. The population of an American city, logically enough, consumes a greater aggregate of resources than that of a less-populous rural unit. But again, per capita consumption is what really matters. The per capita footprint of a city dweller, all else equal, is smaller. To put it another way: a given number of people living at their country’s characteristic standard of living would consume a smaller quantity of resources if they lived in an urban (high-density) pattern than if they lived in a rural or suburban (dispersed, low-density) one.
People need to understand "per capita".
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11-07-2019, 22:23   #216
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Probably flown in from Venezuela ....

Not at you btw - but I do have to laugh at anyone who proposes that cities are somehow 'eco friendly.

Not only do high density urban areas involve the total annihilation of all natural ecosystem and habitats - they concentration of pollutants means that emissions and discharges to the wider environment are a significant and persistent source of toxic pollution.

High density living is not only bad for humans- it certainly does nothing for ecosystems and wildlife which depend on them . That said most development in Dublin and other urban areas in the last couple of decades have been on Greenfield sites with vast areas of detached houses which are spreading at an alarming rate into what was once countryside and all significantly dependent on private transport. See fek all criticism of this tbh .
That's incorrect. Total pollution is greater, yes. Pollution per person is much lower. If all the people in cities lived the lifestyle of the average country person, the world would be one big septic tank.

I say this as a hypocritical country person, reared on a one off house with a septic tank
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11-07-2019, 22:38   #217
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THE TURF IS DREW.
That is all.
Until next year bog.its been emotional.
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11-07-2019, 23:16   #218
gozunda
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That's incorrect. Total pollution is greater, yes. Pollution per person is much lower. If all the people in cities lived the lifestyle of the average country person, the world would be one big septic tank.

I say this as a hypocritical country person, reared on a one off house with a septic tank
Are ye sure about that? Humans produce the same amount of faecal ****e whether stuck up a mountain in Kerry or living in a high rise in Phuket.

I've news for ye - the world is one big 'septic tank'. That said all new builds requiring ' new style treatment systems' (not connected to municipal sewage systems*) must have secondary filters and now incorporate technology to improve the breakdown of waste matter and the quality of effluent. Existing older style septic tanks are inspected for compliance - ours was done a couple of years ago. So yeah we have a lot of crap been flung around here with regard to how urban areas ****e doesn't stink for some strange reason Whatever these areas are - they are not "eco friendly" ...

*the ones discharging untreated sewage directly into water bodies like Cork Harbour etc

Last edited by gozunda; 12-07-2019 at 07:59.
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12-07-2019, 05:33   #219
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[QUOTE=Ush1;110664422]What do you mean greater volume of consumption?


This is per capita,

a meaningless term in this situation, attempting to deflect responsibility and therefore an irrelevant distraction.

Everyone is involved in this impending disaster.

"The saying “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics” was popularised by Mark Twain, who attributed it to the British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli."

Away with this obfuscation!
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12-07-2019, 05:38   #220
Graces7
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THE TURF IS DREW.
That is all.
Until next year bog.its been emotional.
Ah yes... Maybe still cutting out here and I will perforce wait to buy mine until I need it.. looking forward to lighting the stove then...
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12-07-2019, 08:29   #221
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[QUOTE=Graces7;110669495]
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Originally Posted by Ush1 View Post
What do you mean greater volume of consumption?


This is per capita,

a meaningless term in this situation, attempting to deflect responsibility and therefore an irrelevant distraction.

Everyone is involved in this impending disaster.

"The saying “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics” was popularised by Mark Twain, who attributed it to the British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli."

Away with this obfuscation!
Finding it hard to follow what you're talking about to be honest. Per capita means "everyone is involved".

What am I deflecting responsibility from exactly?
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12-07-2019, 08:33   #222
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Light a fire when you're footing it. Keeps the midges away, and quite possibly a few of those dastardly midgets too.
Yer man from Game of Thrones was a right little fecker before he took up the acting.
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12-07-2019, 08:41   #223
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Always took you for a culchie, Emmet.

I can't say this hasn't strained my admiration for you.

Didn't it ever occur to blame the smog on the cars, and not our God given turf?

Honestly, Emmet. I expected better. Tell us a toilet tale and all shall be forgiven.
The smog was from coal, not turf. Turf in small rural communities is way different than a city burning it. I find it bizarre that Bord na Mona are still cutting up bogs on an industrial scale whereas the rural person is the one initially targeted.

We shouldn't be cutting up the bogs full stop. And I footed manys the plot, both with my family and as a summer job.
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12-07-2019, 08:59   #224
Thelonious Monk
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Do people actually think we'd have a cleaner country if everyone lived in one off houses and there were no cities? How on earth could that be greener than cities with shared services taking up less space?
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12-07-2019, 09:12   #225
Srameen
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Do people actually think we'd have a cleaner country if everyone lived in one off houses and there were no cities? How on earth could that be greener than cities with shared services taking up less space?
I live in a deeply rural area and I have to agree with you. If everybody lived as we live: One off house, septic tank, no services except those you drive to, burning smokey coal, digging up bogs for our fuel, etc: the country would be an environmental mess.
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