Advertisement
How to add spoiler tags, edit posts, add images etc. How to - a user's guide to the new version of Boards
Mods please check the Moderators Group for an important update on Mod tools. If you do not have access to the group, please PM Niamh. Thanks!

The Best 10k workouts - by Greg Mcmillan

  • #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 7,598 shels4ever


    Got this in an email today thoguh someone might find it useful.


    The Best 10K Workout

    Plus the buildup workouts for it
    by Greg McMillan, M.S.




    After running countless 10Ks and coaching runners who have run countless more, I've found one workout to be the absolute best to prepare you for the distance. It's not an easy workout and you probably can't do it right away, so you'll need to build up to it with the sequence of workouts outlined here, which, when combined with supplementary workouts, creates an exceptional training plan for your next goal 10K.

    THE BEST 10K WORKOUT: 3 X 2 MILES
    If you can perform three 2-mile repeats at your goal 10K pace in the last one to two weeks before your race, you will achieve your goal time. Period. It's a simple workout but oh-so-hard to accomplish. As such, you must build up to it, and this buildup of workouts turns out to be some of the best training you can do to run a fast 10K.

    BUILDUP WORKOUT NO. 1: 6 X 1 MILE
    Eight weeks out from your 10K, run six 1-mile repeats at your goal 10K pace, taking 3 to 4 minutes recovery jog between each. Don't be surprised if you struggle in this workout. Many athletes become worried that their goal is out of reach, but trust me: You just need to complete the workout sequence and you'll be ready. One thing I find helps is to just focus on goal 10K pace, not faster. Some runners try to "beat the workout" by running faster but that isn't the goal. Start at goal pace and simply hang on.

    BUILDUP WORKOUT NO. 2: 2 MILE + 4 X 1 MILE
    Six weeks out from your 10K, advance to the following workout: Run a 2-mile repeat at your goal 10K pace then take a 5-minute recovery jog. Next, run four 1-mile repeats at goal 10K pace, taking 3 to 4 minutes recovery jog between each. As with Workout No. 1, you will get in 6 miles of running at your goal pace.

    BUILDUP WORKOUT NO. 3: 2 X 2 MILE + 2 X 1 MILE
    Four weeks out from the race, the workout advances yet again. This time, run two 2-mile repeats at goal 10K pace. Again, take a 5-minute recovery jog after each 2-mile repeat. Then, perform two 1-mile repeats at goal pace, taking 3 minutes recovery between each. By now, you should be feeling much more ready to attack your goal time. Your body is becoming calloused to the mental and physical stress of 10K pace. If, however, you're struggling to hit your goal pace even on the first 2-mile repeat, then your proposed goal pace is too aggressive and you should re-evaluate.

    WORLD'S BEST 10K WORKOUT
    After this buildup of workouts, you're ready to attack the ultimate 10K workout. I suggest you perform this workout nine to 12 days before your race to allow enough time to recover before the event. Start with your usual warm-up (which you should perform for each workout described in this article), then run three 2-mile repeats at your goal 10K pace. Take a 5-minute recovery jog between each repeat. Prepare for this intense workout like you will your race -- be well-recovered, properly hydrated and fueled, use the equipment you'll use in the race, run at the time of day that you'll be racing.

    SUPPLEMENTARY WORKOUTS
    While the 10K buildup workouts occur every other week, the in-between weeks provide a great opportunity to perform other important 5K and 10K workouts. I like 200m and 400m repeats performed at 5K effort. I find that running slightly faster repeats on the in-between weeks makes 10K race pace feel easier. You may even perform a 5K race in preparation for your 10K. I also recommend at least one tempo run during this buildup. The pace will be slightly slower than 10K pace but will build your stamina for the goal event.

    SIMPLE EIGHT-WEEK WORKOUT SEQUENCE FOR A FAST 10K


    WEEK KEY WORKOUT & NOTES

    1 6 x 1M 3-minute jog between 1M repeats

    2 10-12 x 400m Run the 400m repeats at 5K race pace; 200m jog between

    3 2M + 4 x 1M 5-minute jog between 2M repeats, 3-minute jog between 1M repeats

    4 3M Tempo Run or 5K Race One simple prediction method is to double your 5K time & add 1 minute to get your 10K time. Are you on track for your goal 10K time?

    5 2 x 2M + 2 x 1M 5-minute jog between 2M repeats, 3-minute jog between 1M repeats

    6 20-24 x 200m Run the 200m repeats at 5K race pace; 200m jog between

    7 3 x 2M Run the 200m repeats at 5K race pace; 200m jog between

    8 RACE: 10K



    Please visit RunningTimes.com for more of my articles.


    Full article here


«13456717

Comments



  • Got this too. Looks good. I think I'll give it a go.




  • Think I'll give it a go too. Looking forward to running fast again.




  • Here's a similar excerpt from a previous article by McMillan on his website:
    A tempo interval workout that I've had particular success with is two (or three) times two miles at 10K race pace effort with three minute recovery jogs between repeats. Following a thorough warm-up, these provide a great training stimulus to prepare you for an upcoming 10K race. The effort required, the pace judgement and the mental discomfort all help immensely when race time comes. Do this workout seven to 14 days before your next 10K.

    He has changed a few minor points in the latest version, not least increasing the recovery time from 3 mins to 5 mins, which should make it more do-able.




  • dna_leri wrote: »
    He has changed a few minor points in the latest version, not least increasing the recovery time from 3 mins to 5 mins, which should make it more do-able.

    Typical!
    I came across that one last week, did it with 3 minute recovery and almost died :)




  • Interesting stuff, no LSR though????


  • Advertisement


  • Interesting stuff, no LSR though????
    It's not a full plan. Just key speed sessions. You've got to fill in the blanks yourself. Personally I'd be looking at 10-16 mile LSRs, but it depends on what you're aiming to achieve.




  • McMillian offers a good guide to creating your training plan on his site: http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/training5b.htm
    The link above shows how to pull it all together, read the previous sections to identify your key sessions.




  • Think I'll give it a go too. Looking forward to running fast again.

    I'm going to give it a lash aswell Krusty...maybe for a good 5m on July 8th.....There is a 10k the following week but i will be in an 8 week cycle by then for the National Half on Sept 4th.
    I might take a very easy week inbetween cycles depending on how i feel after the first 8 weeks.
    Whats your target race ? it will be interesting to see if we get these sessions done...they are very tough looking....I will be trying to do them at 5:40p....even typing that makes me sweat !




  • Sosa wrote: »
    I'm going to give it a lash aswell Krusty...maybe for a good 5m on July 8th.....There is a 10k the following week but i will be in an 8 week cycle by then for the National Half on Sept 4th.
    I might take a very easy week inbetween cycles depending on how i feel after the first 8 weeks.
    Whats your target race ? it will be interesting to see if we get these sessions done...they are very tough looking....I will be trying to do them at 5:40p....even typing that makes me sweat !
    I'm not too sure about a target race at the moment Sosa, but I reckon I'll give Dunshaughlin a pop in June, just to see how I'm fairing, with a view to trying to hit a PB soon afterwards (maybe July). Then there's the Frank Duffy in August, Half marathon in September, and the big dog (Chicago in October).

    Would love to be aiming for 5:40s too, but I'm a log way off that at the moment.




  • I'm not too sure about a target race at the moment Sosa, but I reckon I'll give Dunshaughlin a pop in June, just to see how I'm fairing, with a view to trying to hit a PB soon afterwards (maybe July). Then there's the Frank Duffy in August, Half marathon in September, and the big dog (Chicago in October).

    Would love to be aiming for 5:40s too, but I'm a log way off that at the moment.

    Looking at early July myself....tough sessions,but manageable if we recover enough and go into them fresh.


  • Advertisement


  • Sosa/Krusty,

    Would this be your only speed session of the week if you were following it?
    Would you pad it out with 1 x long, 1 x medium long and 2 x easy/recovery or something to that effect?

    Cheers
    PK




  • Personally, I don't follow that many 10k programs, but I'd be aiming to do a tempo session as well (a few days apart), a long run, and and a sprinkling of stead runs and recovery runs to make 6/7 runs per week.

    A little like halHigdon's advanced program except try and spread out the tempo and other speed sessions (so they're not on consecutive days), and run longer on all the other days (but then my goal is longer distances).




  • I am restricted to 4/5 runs a week at the minute Patrick,so i would do the 10k session on a Tue/Wed and then a 12-15m run at the w/e with a tempo built into it...1/2 steady runs with 1 recovery also in there.




  • Thanks gents.
    PK




  • Should you be doing these sessions on your own? What I mean is, if you do these in a group is it as good a predictor when you factor in drafting, someone else looking after pacing, the competitive nature of group interval sessions etc? The group session might be worth 5-10sec a mile which would be a difference of 30-60sec in target time over a 10k. Or they being McMillan workouts, does he expect you are doing them in a group?




  • I wouldn't think it makes much of a difference. Although in a race you'll more than likely find yourself running in a group so maybe in training running them in a group is preferable, creating similar racing conditions, maybe.




  • Gringo78 wrote: »
    Should you be doing these sessions on your own? What I mean is, if you do these in a group is it as good a predictor when you factor in drafting, someone else looking after pacing, the competitive nature of group interval sessions etc? The group session might be worth 5-10sec a mile which would be a difference of 30-60sec in target time over a 10k. Or they being McMillan workouts, does he expect you are doing them in a group?

    We have been doing similar workouts in a group for the last few thursday (mostly 1k reps). Since everyobe is running at a slighlty different pace, there is no drafting. The adavantage of doing the workouts in a group is that you are less likely to drop out/ditch the last rep as there are other people watching. the only disadvantage is that the faster runners possibly get a little too much rest.




  • menoscemo wrote: »
    The adavantage of doing the workouts in a group is that you are less likely to drop out/ditch the last rep as there are other people watching.

    This is a factor not to be underestimated. I used to do a 6 mile tempo run on my own, and the pace I could hit on this was usually 5 sec a mile slower than the pace I could then expect to hit in a 10 mile race. So I'd need to hit 6:05 pace on a solo 6 mile tempo run to feel I was in sub 60 10 mile shape. It was a good predictor workout for me. However that was in a solo training situation. If I had done the tempo run in a group, I could have hung in longer at a faster pace so maybe 6:05 pace would have only translated to 6:05-6:10 pace over 10 miles on race day. Thats because group training sessions (for me anyway) get the adrenaline up similar to race day.

    So if someone tells me they can do 3x2mile reps at goal 10k pace in a group (maybe not drafting but at least chasing a t-shirt 20m ahead) then I wouldn't neccessarily put money on them being able to replicate the workout on their tod with no one watching. Depends on the person though, some people are great solo trainers and can drive themselves on regardless, others need a bit of visible competition to drive them on.




  • Im actually plan to use the UCD track session tomorrow to do week two of this plan:
    10-12 x 400m Run the 400m repeats at 5K race pace; 200m jog between
    Since we will be on the track there it fits just fine - even if Im there a bit longer than everyone else.

    So maybe 10 x 400m @ 7min pace, or *just* below it..




  • Sorry to drag this back up but it made me think...

    How do you go about determining a realistic 10km time to aim for? I'd love to achieve 40 minutes sometime in the future but currently I am at about 50 minutes and I know I'm a long way off 40 minutes.


  • Advertisement


  • Sorry to drag this back up but it made me think...

    How do you go about determining a realistic 10km time to aim for? I'd love to achieve 40 minutes sometime in the future but currently I am at about 50 minutes and I know I'm a long way off 40 minutes.
    A 5k time trial would be a good way of evaluating your current 10k target. Then shave a little bit off the top!
    In my case, I chose a target based on my last 10k performance and based my target on the improvement I am hoping to realize.

    While I'm not 10k fit at the moment, I hope to be at the end of the McMillan training cycle.




  • Is there a generally accepted/recommended long-run limit when following these types of programmes? ie. Is 10mile long enough??

    Doing plenty of intervals, tempos etc. but a bit limited for the long slogs due to an injury earlier in the year :(




  • Sorry to drag this back up but it made me think...

    How do you go about determining a realistic 10km time to aim for? I'd love to achieve 40 minutes sometime in the future but currently I am at about 50 minutes and I know I'm a long way off 40 minutes.

    Training:
    Generally it is recommended that you don't train at your (longer term) goal pace, you need to train at a pace relative to where your fitness is now (or you will train too hard and get injured, or train too hard and be too fatigued to do all the workouts or just train too hard and violate the principle of getting most benefit from least work).

    So doing a hard 5k TT as suggested above is the way to go. Have nothing left as you cross the line, but pace it evenly all the way through.

    (EDIT) Realistic time to aim for: Aim for gradual improvement, as seen in a regular repeat of that 5k TT or in races. Aim for 45min in several months, then 40 next season.




  • Cartman78 wrote: »
    Is there a generally accepted/recommended long-run limit when following these types of programmes? ie. Is 10mile long enough??

    Doing plenty of intervals, tempos etc. but a bit limited for the long slogs due to an injury earlier in the year :(
    You mean upper limit or lower limit?

    I guess it would depend on your target, your level of experience and how much you hope to improve. If you're an entry level runner, running your first or second 10k, then your long run would probably be 5-6 miles. If you're a semi-regular runner, hoping to hit a PB, then 10-12 miles, and if you're a regular 6/7 day a week runner, training for a range of longer distances, and gains in 10k distance don't come easy, then it should probably be around 12-16 miles. But there aren't really any rules of thumb.




  • You mean upper limit or lower limit?

    I guess it would depend on your target, your level of experience and how much you hope to improve. If you're an entry level runner, running your first or second 10k, then your long run would probably be 5-6 miles. If you're a semi-regular runner, hoping to hit a PB, then 10-12 miles, and if you're a regular 6/7 day a week runner, training for a range of longer distances, and gains in 10k distance don't come easy, then it should probably be around 12-16 miles. But there aren't really any rules of thumb.

    I guess I'm somewhere between a semi-regular and regular runner.

    Have a PB of 40:44 for 10k from last year, based on high marathon training mileage and virtually no speed specific training.

    This year is the complete opposite....broke 2 toes in January so missed 10 weeks training in all. Have been focusing on shorter, more speed specific training since i've got back into it. Have smashed all my PB's for my regular training runs but longest run was about 17k which was absolutely torturous.

    Ran a tough, hilly 10k race last wkend in 42:14 which I was actually quite pleased with but know i need to build up some stamina asap to go with my new found speed




  • Digging this up from the archives - but as I start to focus on shorter stuff for a few weeks - I was thinking of doing this again, as I really enjoyed it last year and it produced great results for me in Dunshaughlin




  • THis is great stuff thanks a million!




  • I wouldn't mind having another pop at this one too, when the dust settles.
    Tough program though. Not for the weak!




  • Digging this up from the archives...
    Cheers, completely forgot about this. I tried this out on the run up to a 10k last year, didnt do all the speed sessions, think I only did the first 3, but I set a big pb nevertheless. Looking forward to trying this out again (and doing it properly this time:D)


  • Advertisement


  • Will be having a crack at this starting next week - looking forward to running fast again after slogging for spring marathon.

    Picked up a pair of Gel DS Trainers at the London Expo last weekend so hopefully the reduced weight and snazzy green laces can push me to multiple PB's over the summer


Advertisement