Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie

General sheep thread

Options
1340341343345346354

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,265 ✭✭✭jfh


    For those with early lambs, how long would you continue to supplement ewe with nuts? Thanks



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,092 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    It depends, if you've plenty of good grass a ewe should be able to feed two lambs on grass alone,

    With poor grazing the ewe would need to be fed for 6 - 8 weeks, milk yield reduces after 6 weeks and lambs should be eating a good bit of meal at that stage



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭White Clover


    Any recommendations for a smaller type EID tags for lambs? Also what Tag reader to people find best? I have a ezi-weigh 7i clock on my scales and also have Flockwatch. I'm looking to get away from the pen & paper!



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,182 ✭✭✭orm0nd


    We have places closed since October so have a fair cover of grass. We supplement until the batch gets too big to do safely. Ewes would be lambed 4 to 7 weeks. Usually start creeping the lambs when we stop feeding the ewes.

    Do this with 2 batches, the third batch, later lambers get no feeding or creep.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,984 ✭✭✭Kevhog1988


    Just on the post in the last few days about viability of a sheep enterprise going forward im hoping that price will at least hold or increase with ewe numbers decreasing.... Loose plan here is to transition a good portion of the flock into a low input system (Easycare or something similar that will lamb outside) and then run a few pure bred dorsets to lamb at christmas. I want to run decent numbers with a better rotational system so that they are moving in one mob around the place and keep on top of rushes etc. Hope to buy more land if i can when i have an existing loan paid off but if i could get more ground to rent close to home id go that way either.

    Off farm job is the main breadwinner here with very little if anything being taken out of the sheep as were trying to improve the place etc. Ive taken a big jump career wise in the past year so pushing that hard to get it to a place where im doing less big hour days and my team are ticking along without hand holding. Currently my fiance does the day to day checks and we do the heavy lifting jobs together at the weekends.

    Out of interest is there a single investment you guys made on your farm which drastically improved/reduced your time spent farming?.

    Post edited by Kevhog1988 on


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 999 ✭✭✭roosky


    Biggest/best investment for me was fencing…..I spent years messing with temporary fencing and moving fencing and blocking gaps and falling out with neighbors…..every time the phone rang you were nervous they were out!

    it has saved me a lot of stress, and allows me to graze our fields better and also split fields when needed.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,014 ✭✭✭Jonnyc135




  • Registered Users Posts: 1,014 ✭✭✭Jonnyc135


    Question regarding Lungworm, seemed to have been a bad year around here for it, what is the worst time of the year for lungworm?

    I done with levas diamond back 3 months ago as a few coughing nothing major and were great condition - coughing stopped completely. Have a handful coughing now. They only seen to cough after doing a run down to the meal trough in great condition otherwise.

    Would this be lungworm again at this time of the year considering it was very mild winter?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,148 ✭✭✭Tileman


    Jeez the sheep are going through some amount of bales. I’ll be tight if it’s a late spring.



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,092 ✭✭✭✭wrangler




  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,148 ✭✭✭Tileman


    No it was lovely lovely grass in that good week in June. Silage and the swap to hay then silage etc. hay was made at end of May aswell. I’d nearly eat it ureself. Was just commenting that week I’ve never seen sheep look as good.



  • Registered Users Posts: 610 ✭✭✭Mad about baa baas


    I have a ewe here that had 2 lambs Tuesday evening. Today I noticed 1 teat is quite big.the bag is full but not rock hard.i think they might be both drinking from the other side.i tried taking milk from the big side but can't get anything

    Although the ewe is very stressful and I'd say not letting milk down for me.. I can only get a tiny bit from the good side.

    Any tips to get them.to drink from the other side?

    The smaller lamb Will struggle if they both stay on 1 teat?

    I was thinking of taking them out for an hour and see if they tackle both sides if hungry?



  • Registered Users Posts: 610 ✭✭✭Mad about baa baas


    Just out there now and I. An get milk from the 1 side freely but can get nothing from the big teat..the bag feels.big and full .I'm wondering it a funny type of mastitis? She is not sick at all though? Yet anyway

    Post edited by Mad about baa baas on


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,984 ✭✭✭Kevhog1988


    Is the milk duct blocked?



  • Registered Users Posts: 610 ✭✭✭Mad about baa baas


    Sounds possible..would I try a needle or dry cow tube up the teat and see can I unblock? She is a first time lamber so can't have any scarring from previous mastitis.



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,092 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    You'd feel the lump in the teat, I only ever had it once in a ewe years ago



  • Registered Users Posts: 610 ✭✭✭Mad about baa baas



    No obvious lump ..tried massaging the udder with a hot cloth but still can't get anything out of that teat



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,092 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    Sounds like she's dry so, you might get to foster one of her lambs, they won't survive on one teat



  • Registered Users Posts: 999 ✭✭✭roosky


    95 ewes to lamb in 2 weeks….how many lambing pens do I need ?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,330 ✭✭✭DJ98


    Usually sets up 12 permanent here for a similar number of ewes but then certain days you'd end up making up extra temporary pens



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 999 ✭✭✭roosky


    thanks I usually have 10 permanent and 4 temporary ones ready to go but thought I might need a few more with the tighter lambing spread



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,199 ✭✭✭Sami23


    How many days would ye leave them in the individual lambing pens before letting them outside or in bad weather into larger group pens ?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,330 ✭✭✭DJ98


    Most are out of them here within a day but some that require a little extra attention stay longer then usually get 2 days in a group pen and everything back out then. Lamb outside so bring everything in to the small pens amd then allow to mix in group pens in shed.



  • Registered Users Posts: 449 ✭✭joe35


    Some of my bales of silage are all white mould. Is it safe to let ewes pick away at these bales. They are singles in good condition. Getting some oats and nuts too.


    Also what causes the white mould. It's throughout the bales and once I grape it out of the feeder, it's like powder



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,199 ✭✭✭Sami23


    What's people's thoughts on letting ewes that are currently lambing out during the day for pick of grass and some exercise and back in to shed at night.

    Any concerns about them getting wet and going back into the shed wet at night.

    Main reason is to minimise straw usage.

    Post edited by Sami23 on


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,092 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    You need to be aware of listeria, any ewes that are affected will either abort or be brain damaged. Thankfully I don't know what listeria looks like in silage but it's a mould too



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,143 ✭✭✭Dinzee Conlee


    Nothing wrong with letting them out, if you could do so easily, be good for em and would save on ration. As long as the house is airy, I wouldn't worry about them coming back in wet. They would be messy to work with would be the only thing…

    But leaving them out to save on straw would be a false economy in my opinion. You’ll be sending the ewes out to soak up water during the day, and then bring it back into the shed at night. I’d even wonder would you end up using more straw to keep a decent bed under them?

    Never did it though, so can’t say either way for certain…



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,199 ✭✭✭Sami23


    Yeah your spot on there - they do be disaster to work with if pulling a lamb when soaking wet alright.

    And yes they be wetting the straw also wit the wet fleece.

    It was more do to with their health I was wondering as I do try to get them back in before heavy rain but got caught out on Monday n they got soaked.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,199 ✭✭✭Sami23


    Question - what do ye do to treat a lamb with sore eyes. Lamb is 6 days old and noticed yesterday his eyes are very watery and barely open ?

    Tia



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 449 ✭✭joe35


    A

    A squirt of penicillin in the eye. Is the eye watering??



Advertisement