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N5 - Ballaghaderreen to Scramoge [construction to commence shortly]

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Comments



  • Apart from the N20 which is going through it's own process, there isn't a National Primary road deserving of the investment the N5 has received over the last decade and over the next couple of years.

    Large parts of the National Primary network got substantial investment since the turn of the millennium, including some parts which received more than it needed and proportionally more than the N5 is currently receiving.




  • user1842 wrote: »
    Care to give an example?


    M20 for a start, as mentioned.
    N22 Ballyvourney - Macroom should have been done years ago, higher traffic levels than most of the N5. Getting done now though.
    N25 Midleton - Youghal. Terribly overcapacity. Should be done before this really, but not on the agenda even.
    N2 Slane - I appreciate there has been controversy here, but it should have been pushed much, much harder by politics.



    Enda Kenny pushed the Ballaghdereen Bypass higher up the pile than it really needed to be.
    The Castleisland and Tralee bypasses were done waaaay out of order to satisfy the Healy-Raes and get their votes on board.
    As mentioned on this thread, Michael Ring has been pushing for this scheme for ages and it's happened. But its hard, in a way, that two N5 schemes are getting done at the same time when there are, lets face it, more deserving schemes out there at the moment. Why did this one get through the statutory processes so quickly when other schemes (M28) get so badly bogged down? The M28 should have been pushed much harder by politics from the very start.



    I'm not begrudging the N5 this upgrade, its badly needed. But I've been following road developments in Ireland for about 15 years now and politics absolutely does come into it.




  • How does the traffic levels on the N5 and N4 from Longford to the west/northwest compare? I understand different sections will vary but generally? Would they be quite similar?




  • M20 for a start, as mentioned.
    N22 Ballyvourney - Macroom should have been done years ago, higher traffic levels than most of the N5. Getting done now though.
    N25 Midleton - Youghal. Terribly overcapacity. Should be done before this really, but not on the agenda even.
    N2 Slane - I appreciate there has been controversy here, but it should have been pushed much, much harder by politics.



    Enda Kenny pushed the Ballaghdereen Bypass higher up the pile than it really needed to be.
    The Castleisland and Tralee bypasses were done waaaay out of order to satisfy the Healy-Raes and get their votes on board.
    As mentioned on this thread, Michael Ring has been pushing for this scheme for ages and it's happened. But its hard, in a way, that two N5 schemes are getting done at the same time when there are, lets face it, more deserving schemes out there at the moment. Why did this one get through the statutory processes so quickly when other schemes (M28) get so badly bogged down? The M28 should have been pushed much harder by politics from the very start.



    I'm not begrudging the N5 this upgrade, its badly needed. But I've been following road developments in Ireland for about 15 years now and politics absolutely does come into it.

    Fair enough and point well made.

    The TII trafic data website is very good:

    https://trafficdata.tii.ie/gmapbasic.asp?sgid=ZvyVmXU8jBt9PJE$c7UXt6




  • It's not just the traffic level that counts here. The stretch from Strokestown to Frenchpark is very dangerous, there have been a fair few people killed and seriously injured on it over the years. I think that was one of the reasons it was pushed. I don't have the stats as to deaths or injuries per km compared to other roads, but it's up there.

    I agree some of it is political pushing, I mean it took them years to bypass the lights at Newland's Cross and at Lucan on the N4 and they had a serious amount of traffic.

    Incidentally, I know it's anecdotal, but a fair few Mayo people I know take the M6 to Athlone and then go N61 and N60 via Roscommon to get back to Mayo as it's faster and safer than the N5. And more recently the M6 to Athenry and M17, N17, N60 to Castlebar. Again, they just perceive it to be safer and it's pretty much just as fast.


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  • KevRossi wrote: »
    It's not just the traffic level that counts here. The stretch from Strokestown to Frenchpark is very dangerous, there have been a fair few people killed and seriously injured on it over the years. I think that was one of the reasons it was pushed. I don't have the stats as to deaths or injuries per km compared to other roads, but it's up there.

    I agree some of it is political pushing, I mean it took them years to bypass the lights at Newland's Cross and at Lucan on the N4 and they had a serious amount of traffic.

    Incidentally, I know it's anecdotal, but a fair few Mayo people I know take the M6 to Athlone and then go N61 and N60 via Roscommon to get back to Mayo as it's faster and safer than the N5. And more recently the M6 to Athenry and M17, N17, N60 to Castlebar. Again, they just perceive it to be safer and it's pretty much just as fast.

    Can confirm, living in West Mayo my first-choice route to Dublin would be taking the R330 through Killawalla to Partry, then when on the N84 as far as Kilmaine, R332 through Foxhall to Tuam and then the route you've described from there. The R332 must be the worst quality road with a fairly high amount of traffic that I've come across, but as of now I prefer taking that route rather than the existing N5




  • How does the traffic levels on the N5 and N4 from Longford to the west/northwest compare? I understand different sections will vary but generally? Would they be quite similar?

    Probably 2:1 N5 v N4.

    N4 has its main accident blackspot pretty much sorted. This section of the N5 is a deathtrap.




  • Safety is more important than capacity when prioritising schemes. Newlands Cross was an inconvenience, but there were major accident blackspots elsewhere on the network that had to be fixed before it.

    N25 Midleton-Youghal is absolutely not a priority over N5. N25 here is a well-engineered, wide and safe road, but it's one that is swamped with traffic twice a day. N5, meanwhile, had several narrow, substandard legacy sections that were never properly designed. Safety is the priority, not capacity. The only safety improvements on N25 would be just east of the Youghal bypass to fix the very sharp bends either side of the Blackwater bridge between Rincrew and Kinsalebeg, and replace/widen the road along the waterside.


    But it's not true to say N5 was favoured ahead of more deserving projects. Apart from the fact that N5 was a pretty dangerous road for a national primary route, it wasn't actually bumped up the list; it was always put on the "once we've done the other Primary Roads, then..." part of the list.

    Some of the schemes cited above were planned ahead of N5, but being started first meant that meant their permissions lapsed during the moratorium on new road building. When money became available again, only the later schemes could be re-activated (N5, N22 Baile Bhuirne), while others were back to square one. The choice was often to fund one of the N5 projects, or build no national primary projects at all. In many ways, being late favoured N5.

    The earlier N5 schemes had the advantage of being relatively cheap, too. Doing any part of N20, even if it hadn't lapsed, would have required committing half a billion euro, but the works on the N5 were much more manageable.

    N2 Slane is a valid point, except that it was also planned to be built ahead of the N5 schemes, but like the Ovens section of N22, it was delayed so much by multiple local objections that it ended up needing a complete re-do.




  • M20 for a start, as mentioned.
    N22 Ballyvourney - Macroom should have been done years ago, higher traffic levels than most of the N5. Getting done now though.
    N25 Midleton - Youghal. Terribly overcapacity. Should be done before this really, but not on the agenda even.
    N2 Slane - I appreciate there has been controversy here, but it should have been pushed much, much harder by politics.



    Enda Kenny pushed the Ballaghdereen Bypass higher up the pile than it really needed to be.
    The Castleisland and Tralee bypasses were done waaaay out of order to satisfy the Healy-Raes and get their votes on board.
    As mentioned on this thread, Michael Ring has been pushing for this scheme for ages and it's happened. But its hard, in a way, that two N5 schemes are getting done at the same time when there are, lets face it, more deserving schemes out there at the moment. Why did this one get through the statutory processes so quickly when other schemes (M28) get so badly bogged down? The M28 should have been pushed much harder by politics from the very start.



    I'm not begrudging the N5 this upgrade, its badly needed. But I've been following road developments in Ireland for about 15 years now and politics absolutely does come into it.

    Most of that is fair enough but the only point I would make is that those are more local/ provincial schemes in counties and regions that already have excellent connections to the wider national road network. Whereas this is the main route in and out of Mayo and part of Roscommon and these sections were/are in particularly poor condition compared to almost all of the other arterial primary routes that connect the regions to Dublin (N1 - N11). Really this upgrade should have been done between 2005 and 2010 at the same time as the motorway network was developed elsewhere, while obviously this doesn't need to be to that standard its upgrade is as important to Mayo as the M6, M7, M8 are to the regions they serve - so in that respect these schemes are really only a case of playing catch up now 15 years later.

    So yes, it isn't the busiest in terms of traffic levels (also as noted partly because people are detouring to avoid it) - indeed there will be routes within Mayo such as the N60 that are probably busier with local traffic, but it's upgrade will be more important to the regional economy in relative terms than local connections such as the N60 or the other busier ones elsewhere around the country that you mentioned.

    Also, if you think it's hard watching two bits of the N5 being done at the moment while other schemes are held back you can probably start to get a feel for what it was like in the north west 10 to 15 years ago when the rest of the country got a motorway network but the north west wasn't even deemed worthy of a decent single carriageway road network to connect it to the rest of the country.

    Sometimes I see threads on boards about other parts of the country - the South East for example seems to have a complex about underfunding compared to other areas. Then you look at a road map and they have not just one but two Motorway/dual carriageway schemes connecting the region to the rest of the country - compared to the north west they don't know they're living!




  • M20 for a start, as mentioned.
    N22 Ballyvourney - Macroom should have been done years ago, higher traffic levels than most of the N5. Getting done now though.
    N25 Midleton - Youghal. Terribly overcapacity. Should be done before this really, but not on the agenda even.
    N2 Slane - I appreciate there has been controversy here, but it should have been pushed much, much harder by politics.



    Enda Kenny pushed the Ballaghdereen Bypass higher up the pile than it really needed to be.
    The Castleisland and Tralee bypasses were done waaaay out of order to satisfy the Healy-Raes and get their votes on board.
    As mentioned on this thread, Michael Ring has been pushing for this scheme for ages and it's happened. But its hard, in a way, that two N5 schemes are getting done at the same time when there are, lets face it, more deserving schemes out there at the moment. Why did this one get through the statutory processes so quickly when other schemes (M28) get so badly bogged down? The M28 should have been pushed much harder by politics from the very start.



    I'm not begrudging the N5 this upgrade, its badly needed. But I've been following road developments in Ireland for about 15 years now and politics absolutely does come into it.

    Yeah all true, but M28 was bogged down with NIMBYism, like everywhere in Ireland if anyone wants to develop anything that runs through an established suburb, the NIMBYs come out to thwart any development. It's a huge problem we have here!


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  • Reuben1210 wrote: »
    Yeah all true, but M28 was bogged down with NIMBYism, like everywhere in Ireland if anyone wants to develop anything that runs through an established suburb, the NIMBYs come out to thwart any development. It's a huge problem we have here!

    It's funny how things work out. The N26 was supposed to be dual carriageway to Bahola but was rejected by An Bord Pleanála as being over the top. 15 years later Westport to Castlebar gets a dual carriageway and it has similar traffic levels to the N26.

    Go figure, at least they are fixing the worst part of the N26, although many parts are bad.




  • Great to see this happen. As someone who drove Westport Dubin 2-3 times a week for work during the 2008-2011 that road is such a busy and dangerous route. You could do 10-15kms behind a truck and not get a spot to pass.
    Surprised that its not dual or at least have multiple passing out lanes. Of late I had been going via Tuam as its a much easier drive though longer but as I own an EV I'd be back using this new N5 again no bother.

    All roads are full of string pulling and politics, for once we have fallen on the right side of it.




  • Type 1 Single carriageway is still a pretty high quality road. 3.65 m lanes with 2.5 m shoulders, combined with the longer view of the road ahead you’ll get from the new alignment would make it fairly easy to pass trucks and such, even if they don't pull in for you.

    555884.png




  • KrisW1001 wrote: »
    Type 1 Single carriageway is still a pretty high quality road. 3.65 m lanes with 2.5 m shoulders, combined with the longer view of the road ahead you’ll get from the new alignment would make it fairly easy to pass trucks and such, even if they don't pull in for you.

    555884.png

    If this road was ever to upgraded after type 1 single carriageway to say dual carriageway is that a huge modification and does the TII take that into account when doing this which I assume they do




  • I always take the M17 and N60 to get to Westport. It takes about the same time as the N5 but I find myself far less tired afterwards.

    I tried the R332 to Kilmaine and R330 Partry to Westport route once but never again, it's just too horrific!
    KevRossi wrote: »
    It's not just the traffic level that counts here. The stretch from Strokestown to Frenchpark is very dangerous, there have been a fair few people killed and seriously injured on it over the years. I think that was one of the reasons it was pushed. I don't have the stats as to deaths or injuries per km compared to other roads, but it's up there.

    I agree some of it is political pushing, I mean it took them years to bypass the lights at Newland's Cross and at Lucan on the N4 and they had a serious amount of traffic.

    Incidentally, I know it's anecdotal, but a fair few Mayo people I know take the M6 to Athlone and then go N61 and N60 via Roscommon to get back to Mayo as it's faster and safer than the N5. And more recently the M6 to Athenry and M17, N17, N60 to Castlebar. Again, they just perceive it to be safer and it's pretty much just as fast.




  • I always take the M17 and N60 to get to Westport. It takes about the same time as the N5 but I find myself far less tired afterwards.

    I tried the R332 to Kilmaine and R330 Partry to Westport route once but never again, it's just too horrific!

    That road Tuam to Kimaine is a death trap when you have done a long day. I tried that like you but never again.
    I tried Claremorris Ballyhappiness a few times into Roscommon but what I found was that if I am leaving at 5.30am I go up the N5 route and down the motorway as the other road is just too busy.




  • lotusm wrote: »
    If this road was ever to upgraded after type 1 single carriageway to say dual carriageway is that a huge modification and does the TII take that into account when doing this which I assume they do

    A lot depends on the amount of land granted to the sheme. The paved (i.e., tarmac) width of a Type 2 DC is 4.2 m wider than a Type 1 SC, but a Type 2 requires an additional pedestrian/cycle way alongside. I imagine enough land has been requested to allow for a 2+2 if it’s ever needed.

    But I don’t see a need for any upgrade in the next 20-30 years here. The traffic volumes on this part of N5 are low: just 5,500 AADT [peaked in 2018]. Even allowing for all the people who take alternative, longer routes to avoid this stretch of N5, the total traffic will not double for a very long time. It would need to more than double to justify a 2+2 road.

    We have so few routes built with consistently good single carriageway in this country that it's often hard to accept that this road type can ever be an adequate solution. Even when we had good single roads, the huge number of entrances allowed on them made driving more difficult than it had to be. But that doesn’t mean that single carriageway roads can’t be good roads.

    As an example, take the N22 from Cork County bounds to Killarney. That road has traffic levels of about 6,000 AADT (more than this bit of N5), but is a properly-built single carriageway with good sightlines and overtaking opportunities. This N5 scheme would be slightly better than that one, in that it’s an entirely offline build, and so would have fewer residential entrances.




  • KrisW1001 wrote: »
    A lot depends on the amount of land granted to the sheme. The paved (i.e., tarmac) width of a Type 2 DC is 4.2 m wider than a Type 1 SC, but a Type 2 requires an additional pedestrian/cycle way alongside. I imagine enough land has been requested to allow for a 2+2 if it’s ever needed.

    But I don’t see a need for any upgrade in the next 20-30 years here. The traffic volumes on this part of N5 are low: just 5,500 AADT [peaked in 2018]. Even allowing for all the people who take alternative, longer routes to avoid this stretch of N5, the total traffic will not double for a very long time. It would need to more than double to justify a 2+2 road.

    We have so few routes built with consistently good single carriageway in this country that it's often hard to accept that this road type can ever be an adequate solution. Even when we had good single roads, the huge number of entrances allowed on them made driving more difficult than it had to be. But that doesn’t mean that single carriageway roads can’t be good roads.

    As an example, take the N22 from Cork County bounds to Killarney. That road has traffic levels of about 6,000 AADT (more than this bit of N5), but is a properly-built single carriageway with good sightlines and overtaking opportunities. This N5 scheme would be slightly better than that one, in that it’s an entirely offline build, and so would have fewer residential entrances.

    I hope the land take around the roundabouts is enough to upgrade them to offline junctions/overpasses in the future, if traffic levels increase. Looking at the maps it does not appear to be the case.




  • M20 for a start, as mentioned.
    N22 Ballyvourney - Macroom should have been done years ago, higher traffic levels than most of the N5. Getting done now though.
    N25 Midleton - Youghal. Terribly overcapacity. Should be done before this really, but not on the agenda even.
    N2 Slane - I appreciate there has been controversy here, but it should have been pushed much, much harder by politics.



    Enda Kenny pushed the Ballaghdereen Bypass higher up the pile than it really needed to be.
    The Castleisland and Tralee bypasses were done waaaay out of order to satisfy the Healy-Raes and get their votes on board.
    As mentioned on this thread, Michael Ring has been pushing for this scheme for ages and it's happened. But its hard, in a way, that two N5 schemes are getting done at the same time when there are, lets face it, more deserving schemes out there at the moment. Why did this one get through the statutory processes so quickly when other schemes (M28) get so badly bogged down? The M28 should have been pushed much harder by politics from the very start.



    I'm not begrudging the N5 this upgrade, its badly needed. But I've been following road developments in Ireland for about 15 years now and politics absolutely does come into it.


    You know why the M28 was so bogged down: NIMBYism. That's not the fault of government, Mayo, Roscommon or anyone else. It's the fault of some dim-witted dúmáns of locals who chose to delay and deny it for as long as possible. Should local politicians have advocated more strongly in favour? Yes. It's not like there's a shortage of TDs and senators for Co. Cork, let alone that specific constituency. There are 18 TDs representing Co. Cork. Obviously politicians will play local politics when it strategically suits them. Perhaps Cork people should be more strategic in who they vote for. I was staying in Mid Cork last summer. Several locals astounded me by saying there would be no need for a bypass of Macroom ''if the Kerrys weren't over here working in Cork City''.

    We see the same nonsense in Dublin, where people are supposedly above and beyond parochialism:

    BusConnects: delayed because of loss of parking spaces, delayed because of trees, trees being bandaged with yellow ribbons like as if they're being expelled as refugees, objections because of new bus routes, complaints because of fewer bus stops, objections/'representations' about a perceived loss of service.

    Metrolink: Delays and faux outrage sprayed all over the media because a GAA Club would lose pitches. A leading government minister and then sitting Taoiseach got involved. Bear in mind this is in one of the wealthiest and most influential areas in the country.

    Complaints about underground shafts. Objections, leading to delays, about the route. Complaints about where it should start. Complaints about where it should end. The cancellation of a section of the route due to innumerable objections that were aired as nauseam on national media. Complaints about lane closures. Objections about *too many trains* potentially coming to a certain area, leading to less opportunity to drive...

    You mentioned the Slane bypass. More whataboutery, objections and needless pissing about wasting time are the reasons why it hasn't been developed. Asides from this, the M1 runs parallel only a few miles east so there is an alternative route.

    N25 Midleton - Youghal is over capacity but it's still safe. Locals need to make it a political issue if they want to see progress. That's how these things work, but in the order of priority, safety has dominated major road schemes recently and that's a good thing.

    This needless begrudergy when areas get infrastructure is tiring. Do I begrudge Wexford for having a motorway and full bypasses of all their major towns? No, I don't because they were needed and Rosslare to Dublin benefits us all. Nor do I begrudge any area getting modern, safe infrastructure because it saves lives, creates jobs and makes this country a better place to live in.

    Those people who actively decide to deny themselves and their communities such infrastructure need to be countered by those who do, both socially and politically. In the case of the M28 and those examples I listed above, that unfortunately didn't/isn't happening.

    In Mayo and Roscommon, people voted strategically for these issues via lobbying and canvassing their elected representatives. That's called being smart and using your vote wisely. More importantly, they allowed the N5 projects to be processed through the planning system unhindered by not needlessly objecting to something that would benefit them, despite the failed attempts by An Taisce and others to do so.

    We need to stop being petty about these things. It's childish, regionalist, parochial and tribalist. All of the projects currently going through planning that I'm aware of, bar maybe a stretch of the N2 currently being designed which seems a bit needless, are warranted. End of.




  • KrisW1001 wrote: »
    Type 1 Single carriageway is still a pretty high quality road. 3.65 m lanes with 2.5 m shoulders, combined with the longer view of the road ahead you’ll get from the new alignment would make it fairly easy to pass trucks and such, even if they don't pull in for you.

    555884.png

    Hopefully the alignment is decent. The new Ballaghaderreen bypass is awful for overtaking compared to the older Charlestown & Swinford section.


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  • You know why the M28 was so bogged down: NIMBYism. That's not the fault of government, Mayo, Roscommon or anyone else. It's the fault of some dim-witted dúmáns of locals who chose to delay and deny it for as long as possible. Should local politicians have advocated more strongly in favour? Yes. It's not like there's a shortage of TDs and senators for Co. Cork, let alone that specific constituency. There are 18 TDs representing Co. Cork. Obviously politicians will play local politics when it strategically suits them. Perhaps Cork people should be more strategic in who they vote for. I was staying in Mid Cork last summer. Several locals astounded me by saying there would be no need for a bypass of Macroom ''if the Kerrys weren't over here working in Cork City''.

    We see the same nonsense in Dublin, where people are supposedly above and beyond parochialism:

    BusConnects: delayed because of loss of parking spaces, delayed because of trees, trees being bandaged with yellow ribbons like as if they're being expelled as refugees, objections because of new bus routes, complaints because of fewer bus stops, objections/'representations' about a perceived loss of service.

    Metrolink: Delays and faux outrage sprayed all over the media because a GAA Club would lose pitches. A leading government minister and then sitting Taoiseach got involved. Bear in mind this is in one of the wealthiest and most influential areas in the country.

    Complaints about underground shafts. Objections, leading to delays, about the route. Complaints about where it should start. Complaints about where it should end. The cancellation of a section of the route due to innumerable objections that were aired as nauseam on national media. Complaints about lane closures. Objections about *too many trains* potentially coming to a certain area, leading to less opportunity to drive...

    You mentioned the Slane bypass. More whataboutery, objections and needless pissing about wasting time are the reasons why it hasn't been developed. Asides from this, the M1 runs parallel only a few miles east so there is an alternative route.

    N25 Midleton - Youghal is over capacity but it's still safe. Locals need to make it a political issue if they want to see progress. That's how these things work, but in the order of priority, safety has dominated major road schemes recently and that's a good thing.

    This needless begrudergy when areas get infrastructure is tiring. Do I begrudge Wexford for having a motorway and full bypasses of all their major towns? No, I don't because they were needed and Rosslare to Dublin benefits us all. Nor do I begrudge any area getting modern, safe infrastructure because it saves lives, creates jobs and makes this country a better place to live in.

    Those people who actively decide to deny themselves and their communities such infrastructure need to be countered by those who do, both socially and politically. In the case of the M28 and those examples I listed above, that unfortunately didn't/isn't happening.

    In Mayo and Roscommon, people voted strategically for these issues via lobbying and canvassing their elected representatives. That's called being smart and using your vote wisely. More importantly, they allowed the N5 projects to be processed through the planning system unhindered by not needlessly objecting to something that would benefit them, despite the failed attempts by An Taisce and others to do so.

    We need to stop being petty about these things. It's childish, regionalist, parochial and tribalist. All of the projects currently going through planning that I'm aware of, bar maybe a stretch of the N2 currently being designed which seems a bit needless, are warranted. End of.




    Well said HabibiLibneni. I totally agree. The snails pace at which some of those projects are progressing (or not) is depressing. In the case of the Dublin public transport projects it's inexcusable. I left Ireland over 30 years ago, but I've heard the same projects being re-packaged and re-announced countless times since I was a teenager.



    Mind you, Ireland is not alone in this regard. Democracy is the best system we have, but it should serve the greater good, not the selfish desires of small minorities.




  • There is always begrudgingly bullsh1t from the rest of the country when anything is built west of the Shannon.

    Fact is the west has to fight tooth and nail for everything it gets.




  • yew_tree wrote: »
    There is always begrudgingly bullsh1t from the rest of the country when anything is built west of the Shannon.

    Fact is the west has to fight tooth and nail for everything it gets.
    Let's be honest. The West is very sparsely populated compared to the rest of the country and has actually done very well (especially on the N5 thanks mainly to Enda being Taoiseach) compared to areas with higher population densities with similar needs.




  • More factually inaccurate and nauseatingly stereotypical whataboutery.

    If you're going to compare to Leinster, that's a non-runner where counties like Laois, Louth, Kildare, Kilkenny and Wexford have effectively bid goodbye to their historic bottlenecks, single carriageway roads and deathtraps, with only a few minor exceptions, Slane being a notable one, Celbridge with its single bridge is another, but it's still bypassed completely. The one road that stands out is the N4 Mullingar to Longford - the road to Sligo, Leitrim, Mayo and North Roscommon.

    If you're comparing to Munster, it's already been explained and debated via multiple fora on this site why Munster is so behind on notable road projects: planning permission lapsed during the recession for the likes of the M20, and NIMBYism, which seems acutely strong in this region, held up/is holding up the likes of the M28. Even within Munster, counties Clare and Waterford have generally very good or excellent primary/secondary roads and/or motorways. Kerry County Council has proven itself to be very proactive in addressing accident blackspots, dangerous bends and poor alignments of national secondary roads. Other councils should take note of this.

    Cork, Kerry and Limerick stand out for some major bottlenecks and inadequate roads, but equally these 3 counties benefitted hugely during the boom, with motorways to Limerick and Cork, bypasses of Tralee, Castleisland, Patrickswell etc, plus all the towns bypassed by said motorways such as Fermoy, Nenagh, Cashel.

    The West didn't receive anything like this during the boom. Bar the M6, N4 Rooskey to Carrick, the N17 Knock to Claremorris and N4 Collooney to Sligo, there were no major road projects for some years until the M17/18, which arguably benefits Limerick and Clare more than Galway, certainly more than Galway City.

    The West, which would include Donegal too, is getting infrastructure it needs and is entitled to. All projects meet TII guidelines, including project cost benefit analysis, population density, urban connectivity and future growth projections as per demographics and Project Ireland 2040. The idea that Sligo Town, Castlebar or Ballina are sparse backwaters vis-à-vis Tralee, Adare or Charleville is laughable nonsense and only proves you have some sort of grudge against the region based on false, stereotypical, classist and ahistorical biases and prejudices.




  • I was chatting to someone working on the new Sligo rd and what he has heard is that once that is completed, Road Bridge will be moving plant south to setup compounds any haul road, and start on the couple of structures to be built.
    Sligo rd due to be finished for August bank holiday but they are unlikely to make that date due to a delay in stuff like signage and crash barriers arriving.
    Start of September a more likely date.

    There is a bridge needed to cross a small river a couple of hundred metres from the Scramogue tie in but will require a lot of ground make up to it, so can see that getting under way before the winter kicks in.




  • Any official confirmation on when this is starting?





  • Aug 12th is the target date now for the Sligo rd. A lot of workers working through the builders holidays to meet that target, so will be taking leave afterwards. Unlikely much will happen before the beginning of September.





  • Contract award still not announced, but good to see jobs on this project being advertised already.





  • its taking a long time to get this road going

    is the contract for construction signed yet



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  • its taking a long time to get this road going

    is the contract for construction signed yet



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