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Collecting blank firing guns?

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  • 10-01-2023 10:30pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3


    Hello everyone,

    I was wondering if anyone here has any experience collecting blank firing replicas/conversions.

    I used to live in the US and had a decent collection of 9mm PAK pistols that I sold off before moving here years ago but I'd like to get back into it now that I've got the funds.

    Is it difficult to start a collection here and is there any specific requirements like security?

    I'm aware you need a "Good reason" for an authorization but I'm not sure collecting would be considered one, then again I could be wrong and someone will tell me otherwise.

    What's the best way of me going about this?

    Thank you for your time.

    Tagged:


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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,976 ✭✭✭✭Grizzly 45


    Is it difficult to start a collection here and is there any specific requirements like security?

    Yup, it is as blank-firing firearms are treated just the same as live guns under the firearms legislation.So you need a license for each one,and probably blank firing handguns above a .22 blank will probably be considered restricted firearms,so unliscenseable under current regimes.

    I'm aware you need a "Good reason" for authorization but I'm not sure collecting would be considered one, then again I could be wrong and someone will tell me otherwise.

    "Collecting" isn't looked at here as a good reason to issue an individual license per gun in Ireland. [We license the gun not the man here in Ireland, unlike 99% of the Union]. So you would need a good reason for each and every individual gun. This is a pity, because even PAK blank-firing guns are an interesting field of firearms in themselves.

    The only way, I could see you having any success with this project would be to become a movie prop armoured. Most of those that do this are registered gun dealers in their own rights, and most are getting out of the game as its easier to use an airsoft prop and some CGI,as it is safer considering enough people have been killed with blank firing guns on movie sets, and you don't get an expensive gun returned to you in sht state and or damaged by mishandling.

    TBH, this is probably THE worst country in the EU,if you are a firearms collector,of any kind,[bar maybe antique muskets] to set up a base.Sucks big time,but it is what it is.

    "If you want to keep someone away from your house, Just fire the shotgun through the door."

    Vice President [and former lawyer] Joe Biden Field& Stream Magazine interview Feb 2013 "



  • Registered Users Posts: 3 User202301


    Thats a real shame, I used to have some really interesting models that I'd love to have over here, maybe in the future it won't be as restrictive.



  • Registered Users Posts: 552 ✭✭✭Munsterlad102


    IIRC, blank firing short firearms are non restricted firearms. So you can get an authorisation from your local superintendent. That being said, it’ll probably vary greatly from district to district so you might be lucky or unlucky.

    According the the Garda website you can license a firearm for the purpose of investing, so maybe collecting could fall under this.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3 User202301


    Interesting, alot of blank firing guns certainly are investments, I used to have some really rare Japanese "model guns" that are worth some serious money nowadays. Sure, I'll give it a shot and send an email to a superintendent, see what they have to say.

    Out of curiosity if your writing to get authorization does it have to be same superintendent as the district you live in?



  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 28,511 Mod ✭✭✭✭Cass


    Iirc that caveat falls under the banner of antique firearms and if it can be still fired then it still requires a license or authorisation in this instance as a blank firer.

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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,976 ✭✭✭✭Grizzly 45


    I'd say,and it's also why I said they will probably be classified as restricted handguns and hence unliscenseable,or at least certain models will be.Is because some of these designs can be, and have been converted to live ammo firing pistols, that have been used both here and in the UK in gang-related shootings.

    Infamously is the Russian Bakial company copy of the Makarov service pistol. It's basically the real Makrov pistol with a blocked barrel that can be bored out.As well as some Pakistani designs sold thru Turkey that are Glock lookalikes and were deliberately designed from the word go to be easily convertible to fire live ammo.

    Think there were a few of the Japanese model guns that had the same problem in Japan, and were used in gang shootings over there, and were pulled too?

    AGS is well aware of these types of conversions,so going by the philosophy in Ireland with anything odd in firearms the rule of Always Cover Ass [ACA ] will apply to this in a Supers thinking on issuing a permit/license for them.

    "If you want to keep someone away from your house, Just fire the shotgun through the door."

    Vice President [and former lawyer] Joe Biden Field& Stream Magazine interview Feb 2013 "



  • Registered Users Posts: 552 ✭✭✭Munsterlad102


    I’m not too familiar with blank firing guns, but be careful about some of the ones that have parts interchangeable with living firing guns as they probably wouldn’t be allowed. I think those Japanese model guns might be a no go, at least the full auto ones, because they might be Cat A firearms under EU law but I’m open to correction.

    I’d imagine so. I applied for a license not too long ago and they were asking me whether I lived in the district, so I assume that they wouldn’t have processed my application. I’d recommend to just get a good few convincing arguments together, get storage and do a firearms safety course to increase your chances.



  • Registered Users Posts: 40,372 ✭✭✭✭ohnonotgmail


    are there similar restrictions with deactivated firearms?



  • Registered Users Posts: 552 ✭✭✭Munsterlad102




  • Registered Users Posts: 40,372 ✭✭✭✭ohnonotgmail


    I was afraid of that. Always wanted a nice Lee Enfield hanging on the wall.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 40,291 ✭✭✭✭Gatling


    You can get an airsoft version or one that's been converted to airsoft,



  • Registered Users Posts: 552 ✭✭✭Munsterlad102


    It’s certainly doable, probably easier to justify to a superintendent than a blank pistol. I’ve seen quite a few deactivated firearms sold at auction so you get them, but it’ll depend on your local super.



  • Registered Users Posts: 773 ✭✭✭tonysopprano


    Generally, at auction, deactivated firearms sell for way more than an actual working firearm. Join a range and get involved/compete giving you good reason, and you have more of a legal standing than having to try to justify (un-specified in law and therefore rocky ground for appeal) on some arbitrary grounds to a Super. A Firearms Certificate is valid for 3 years, whereas an authorisation from a Super lasts as long as he stipulates, with no recourse to appeal. The above ONLY relates to NON-RESTRICTED firearms.

    If you can do the job, do it. If you can't do the job, just teach it. If you really suck at it, just become a union executive or politician.



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,976 ✭✭✭✭Grizzly 45


    I think those Japanese model guns might be a no go, at least the full auto ones, because they might be Cat A firearms under EU law but I’m open to correction.

    Good question,as the directive applies to original full auto weapons converted to blank firing, as what happened in the Paris shootings and started this whole sorry mess off. It never mentioned blank-firing guns in full auto built from the ground up as models. Probably because they are so rare in the EU or were banned in different countries beforehand.But worth keeping in mind .

    This brings us to...

    Are there similar restrictions with deactivated firearms?

    Yes and no. In theory,it should be easier to get the Supers to permit to keep a deact.HOWEVER with the new EU directive on deactivation. If you purchase a deact now, it cant dry fire, has a detachable magazine, have more holes in the barrel than a slice of Swiss cheese, and be welded up so much that under the new directive, it is no more than a high-tech and awkward club! AND you must have an EU-approved cert of deactivation carried out by a recognised proof house.

    The trouble is; We DO NOT have a recognised proof house in Ireland, so you would have to export this to the UK[Good luck with that mess of paperwork and costs!] or the EU mainland, and wait about a year plus before they can get around to doing this work. So add about 400 euros to transport your deact both ways at 200 euros a trip, and you start to get the picture of why it is a rather expensive option.

    So all your Super has to ask for is that you have EU proof of deactivation,and say you bought an old WW1 keepsake off someone's family that was legitimately deactivated to the perfectly acceptable "old spec "deactivation, where the gun could still cycle its action, etc. Both you and they can be charged with possession of a firearm!!!.

    As you must have the old spec deact deactivated further to the new spec,if you want to buy,sell,trade,inherit,swop etc the ownership. IOW you can keep an old spec deact so long as you live, but once you want to do anything with it, legally,it has to be" RE deactivated"to make it safer according to our Lords and Masters in Brussels.

    "If you want to keep someone away from your house, Just fire the shotgun through the door."

    Vice President [and former lawyer] Joe Biden Field& Stream Magazine interview Feb 2013 "



  • Registered Users Posts: 264 ✭✭judestynes


    Is there a particular type or era or even make of blank firer you want to collect? Simply apply to your local district office for an authorization, they will want to know the make and serial number so the RFD who is importing them for you will have to put a number on them as the Italian blank firers Bruni and Kimar come without numbers (why would they number them as you can just walk in and buy them over the counter) but the German ( Umarex and ME sportwaffen) and Turkish ( Zoraki and Ekol) manufacturer's do put serial numbers on. You'll have to include the caliber and how many round on the application letter too. The authorization will need to be renewed every year or as often as the superintendent see appropriate. Security wise, no special security arrangements, I've had a visit from the crime prevention officer because how many I have but most guys who are into reenacting and have blank firers haven't had to be inspected.

    Hope that helps.



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