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Told off for being on leave

  • 01-07-2021 1:35pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 47 slo007


    Hello,

    I was on approved leave and an activity which was planned for 2 days after I planned to return occurred early, whilst I was away. I answered my phone throughout the activity and it went well without a hitch.

    Nevertheless, instead of getting the expected congratulations, my manager told me off for being on leave, having lack of ownership, being hard to reach, etc. and that I should have cancelled my leave, etc.

    I disagreed with the arguments and he told me I was being defensive.

    I suspect this will come up again at year-end.

    Should I follow up now? How can I do so from a position that makes sense? Should it be in writing or verbal?

    Can the business expect someone to drop everything (holidays) on the spot and without notice?


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,665 ✭✭✭ Fann Linn


    You're on approved leave.
    Clown brings meeting/event forward.
    It's his fault.



    Take screenshot of above and give it to your boss,


  • Registered Users Posts: 102 ✭✭ topdecko


    You mean you were on leave and the company rescheduled a work activity to take place when you were on leave which you took part in (on your leave). You returned to a manager berating you for being on leave.
    Would need to understand context here - how important was this activity? When was it rearranged etc. When did you book the leave and had you organised something for that week or were you sitting in your underpants at home etc


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,961 ✭✭✭ Stovepipe


    Tell him to piss off,politely,of course. You are entitled to leave and entitled to not being disturbed on your days off. You could have been at a sick child's bedside for all he knew. Don't commit anything to paper or email as it will be used as a weapon against you. If they use this against you at a later date, tell them you will go legal if they interfere with your private life again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,298 ✭✭✭✭ HeidiHeidi


    topdecko wrote: »
    You mean you were on leave and the company rescheduled a work activity to take place when you were on leave which you took part in (on your leave). You returned to a manager berating you for being on leave.
    Would need to understand context here - how important was this activity? When was it rearranged etc. When did you book the leave and had you organised something for that week or were you sitting in your underpants at home etc

    If sitting in his underpants at home is what he wants to do with his leave, that's his perogative, surely?

    Who decided to move the event, and when and why?


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,665 ✭✭✭ Fann Linn


    topdecko wrote: »
    You mean you were on leave and the company rescheduled a work activity to take place when you were on leave which you took part in (on your leave). You returned to a manager berating you for being on leave.
    Would need to understand context here - how important was this activity? When was it rearranged etc. When did you book the leave and had you organised something for that week or were you sitting in your underpants at home etc


    In fairness the op doesn't need to answer any of those questions.
    The leave was APPROVED.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 520 ✭✭✭ sbs2010


    Holy sh1t, that boss sounds like a total ass hole.

    And tells you you're defensive when you explain it from your side.

    If you were essential to the piece of work the fault is entirely with whoever decided to reschedule it without knowing all the key people were available.

    Was that the boss? Is he trying to shift blame for his fcuk up?


  • Registered Users, Subscribers Posts: 13,037 ✭✭✭✭ antodeco


    Surely this would fall under the Right to Disconnect and you were under zero obligation on approved leave to even know if the existence of stuff happening!


  • Registered Users Posts: 31,993 ✭✭✭✭ o1s1n


    sbs2010 wrote: »
    Holy sh1t, that boss sounds like a total ass hole.

    And tells you you're defensive when you explain it from your side.

    If you were essential to the piece of work the fault is entirely with whoever decided to reschedule it without knowing all the key people were available.

    Was that the boss? Is he trying to shift blame for his fcuk up?

    Yeah it sounds like the boss has pressure coming down on him from above and he's looking for an easy target to blame.

    I'd be having none of that! In our fast paced modern world, leave is bloody sacred. You should be able to switch off and be left alone for the duration.

    I'd seriously be looking for another place to work if they were unable to do something as simple as respect when I'm on leave.


  • Registered Users Posts: 47 slo007


    topdecko wrote: »
    Would need to understand context here - how important was this activity?

    Expensive, not business critical.
    When was it rearranged etc.

    Same day it took place, no notice
    When did you book the leave

    2-3 months ago
    had you organised something for that week or were you sitting in your underpants at home etc

    I was away due to personal commitments


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,704 ✭✭✭ superflyninja


    So even though you were on leave you took calls? Id be going to HR. Sounds like the boss is trying to dump this on you.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,334 ✭✭✭ sprucemoose


    topdecko wrote: »
    how important was this activity? When was it rearranged etc. When did you book the leave and had you organised something for that week or were you sitting in your underpants at home etc

    none of those are relevant whatsoever, if it were approved then thats that. The op was being incredibly helpful by dealing with the matter as best they could while on leave and was in no way at fault for any possible problems


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,929 ✭✭✭✭ Calahonda52


    Document your recall of the meeting now on paper for your own use, sign and date it and then request a meeting with HR and your manager to seek clarification of the company policy to such issues so that you can be a team player.
    You can use the notes as an aide memoir during the meeting but don't part with it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,374 ✭✭✭✭ loyatemu


    slo007 wrote: »
    Same day it took place, no notice

    so they rearranged it while you were already on leave?
    probably shouldn't have even answered your phone.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,326 ✭✭✭ Thoie


    I'd also be asking for that day of leave back as well.

    Was it the manager rearranged it, or someone else (like a client, for example)?



    I'd document a mail to the manager saying that you were out of office on annual leave, as agreed on <date in April>. Everyone had notice that you were unavailable during that time, yet after you had already left the office <someone> rearranged important meeting to happen during your absence.

    You facilitated the change to the best of your ability under the circumstances, but would like that day's vacation time back, and would like his suggestions on how to avoid similar issues in future.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,586 ✭✭✭ Hooked


    Just stumbled in from the home page...

    Sorry to sound harsh, but you took a work call while on approved annual leave? I'm more upset with you, than your boss, to be honest.

    While I work VERY hard during my scheduled 9-5.30, Mon to Friday job... I've never entertained a call/email or otherwise, outside of those hours...

    And you'd have a snowballs chance in hell of getting hold of me while on leave!


  • Registered Users Posts: 517 ✭✭✭ Telly


    Why did you answer calls on your day off?


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,544 ✭✭✭✭ Supercell


    Sounds like your manager is being a power mad dick.
    I'd be talking to HR about this as in no way should you be punished for helping when on leave that was requested a few months beforehand.
    Oh in future dont answer work calls when on leave at all, tell them your phone broke, dog ate it or whatever, they have no right to be bothering you when on approved leave.

    Have a weather station?, why not join the Ireland Weather Network - http://irelandweather.eu/



  • Registered Users Posts: 19,078 ✭✭✭✭ Ash.J.Williams


    slo007 wrote: »
    Hello,

    I was on approved leave and an activity which was planned for 2 days after I planned to return occurred early, whilst I was away. I answered my phone throughout the activity and it went well without a hitch.

    Nevertheless, instead of getting the expected congratulations, my manager told me off for being on leave, having lack of ownership, being hard to reach, etc. and that I should have cancelled my leave, etc.

    I disagreed with the arguments and he told me I was being defensive.

    I suspect this will come up again at year-end.

    Should I follow up now? How can I do so from a position that makes sense? Should it be in writing or verbal?

    Can the business expect someone to drop everything (holidays) on the spot and without notice?

    getting all to normal now


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,586 ✭✭✭ Hooked


      Supercell wrote: »
      Sounds like your manager is being a power mad dick.
      I'd be talking to HR about this as in no way should you be pushished for helping when on leave that was requested a few months beforehand.
      Oh in future dont answer work calls when on leave at all, tell them your phone broke, dog ate it or whatever, they have no right to be bothering you when on approved leave.

      Better still - tell them that you saw the call... but you were on féckin' leave!


    • Registered Users Posts: 19,078 ✭✭✭✭ Ash.J.Williams


      Telly wrote: »
      Why did you answer calls on your day off?

      in 2021 things need sorting asap and can't wait for key people to return

      sad but true


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    • Registered Users Posts: 3,475 ✭✭✭ Potatoeman


      Depends on your job, how many projects you have and how high profile they are. You’re entitled to leave but they can get you to move it. You can negotiate losses on deposits and flights if it was already approved.

      I worked with someone that arranged something then went on leave with no handover. Their manager had to agree a project handover to me which meant I got a portion of their annual bonus. They didn’t contact him at all but was told the situation would be reflected in his review when he returned. So it depends how things happen.


    • Registered Users Posts: 11,716 ✭✭✭✭ Interested Observer


      in 2021 things need sorting asap and can't wait for key people to return

      sad but true

      In 2021 if you go on leave and stay out of contact, the company will still be there when you get back. The reality is most people are not really that "key" at all. People shouldn't be working while on PTO and a manager who punishes employees for not working hard enough while on PTO is garbage. I would not work for someone like that under any circumstances.


    • Registered Users Posts: 23,902 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


      slo007 wrote: »
      Hello,

      I was on approved leave and an activity which was planned for 2 days after I planned to return occurred early, whilst I was away. I answered my phone throughout the activity and it went well without a hitch.

      What level are you at?

      If you're a VP or MD or a C-level exec, then your manager is right. And yes, they do own your soul.

      If you're middle management, you need to learn to delegate so you don't get caught owning stuff. And you need to manage relationships better so that stuff isn't changed at the last minute on you.

      If you're a project manager, then suck it up: owning stuff is what you do.

      If you're a clerical officer, PA, admin assistant, General operative etc, then the other posters here are right.


    • Registered Users Posts: 214 ✭✭ LapsypaCork


      Document your recall of the meeting now on paper for your own use, sign and date it and then request a meeting with HR and your manager to seek clarification of the company policy to such issues so that you can be a team player.
      You can use the notes as an aide memoir during the meeting but don't part with it.

      I agree that the above would the best route, also outline the pointers you made earlier such as, how long ago the leave was arranged but your under absolutely no obligation to state why you needed the leave.
      Maybe wait a day or 2, no longer, definitely request a sit down meeting and include a 3rd person, such as HR, under no circumstances have a one to one with your boss, he may twist the story. Indeed, it could come up in your annual review so best sort it out now. Also, if you let this incident go, your creating a precedent…


    • Registered Users Posts: 203 ✭✭ SunnySundays


      Dear Manager,

      Further to our conversation last week where you expressed disappointment with me, raised concerns I wasn't a team player etc. (list all of the complaints), I am seeking to understand the situation better so I can take the learnings from it.

      As you know I booked my annual leave in April for a specific reason/requirement I had on Xth of June.

      Despite the fact I was on annual leave, I'm sure you will agree that I facilitated several calls (document them all - time & duration) during the day to provide you with as much support as possible even though I was supposed to be on a day off. I also understand from other colleagues that the event was a resounding success and in no way negatively impacted by my leave.

      Can you please advise as to what you think I should do differently going forward as I am extremely disappointed to receive negative feedback, especially considering I made myself available by phone on the day to support you in every possible way. I am keen to avoid similar situations in future.

      Kind Regards,
      X


    • Registered Users Posts: 349 ✭✭ Elwood_Blues


      Dear Manager,

      Further to our conversation last week where you expressed disappointment with me, raised concerns I wasn't a team player etc. (list all of the complaints), I am seeking to understand the situation better so I can take the learnings from it.

      As you know I booked my annual leave in April for a specific reason/requirement I had on Xth of June.

      Despite the fact I was on annual leave, I'm sure you will agree that I facilitated several calls (document them all - time & duration) during the day to provide you with as much support as possible even though I was supposed to be on a day off. I also understand from other colleagues that the event was a resounding success and in no way negatively impacted by my leave.

      Can you please advise as to what you think I should do differently going forward as I am extremely disappointed to receive negative feedback, especially considering I made myself available by phone on the day to support you in every possible way. I am keen to avoid similar situations in future.

      Kind Regards,
      X

      You forgot, P.S. Kindly go Fu(k yourself


    • Registered Users Posts: 3,843 ✭✭✭ fvp4


      Potatoeman wrote: »
      Depends on your job, how many projects you have and how high profile they are. You’re entitled to leave but they can get you to move it. You can negotiate losses on deposits and flights if it was already approved.

      I worked with someone that arranged something then went on leave with no handover. Their manager had to agree a project handover to me which meant I got a portion of their annual bonus. They didn’t contact him at all but was told the situation would be reflected in his review when he returned. So it depends how things happen.

      That's also ludicrous.


    • Registered Users Posts: 1,448 ✭✭✭ Mimon


      I'd be asking for a full days pay and and the day's holiday back for being disturbed and having to take calls on one of the days my leave.

      Manager is living in lala land if he thinks you have done anything wrong and needs to be taken down a peg.


    • Registered Users Posts: 203 ✭✭ SunnySundays


      You forgot, P.S. Kindly go Fu(k yourself

      That's in white font underneath!!!


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    • Registered Users Posts: 3,843 ✭✭✭ fvp4


      What level are you at?

      If you're a VP or MD or a C-level exec, then your manager is right. And yes, they do own your soul.

      If you're middle management, you need to learn to delegate so you don't get caught owning stuff. And you need to manage relationships better so that stuff isn't changed at the last minute on you.

      If you're a project manager, then suck it up: owning stuff is what you do.

      If you're a clerical officer, PA, admin assistant, General operative etc, then the other posters here are right.

      Ignore all this ( as usual). Booked leave is booked leave "C-Level" or not. Project manager or not.

      These people just need to have a replacement set up.

      In this case its all moot anyway as the event was re-arranged in one day and the OP was actually on the call. Complaining in that situation is insane..


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