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red clover

  • 13-06-2021 2:52pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 789 ✭✭✭ weatherbyfoxer


    anyone have much experience of red clover?.the silage ground here hasn't been reseeded since 2005 and the more traditional lower feed value grasses have now taken over, have been thinking about getting red clover stitched into next spring..im wondering could this be done with spraying off old grass or whats the best way of doing it do people find?


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Comments

  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,027 Mod ✭✭✭✭ blue5000


    Can you plough it?

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



  • Registered Users Posts: 789 ✭✭✭ weatherbyfoxer


    blue5000 wrote: »
    Can you plough it?

    i can plough it but im looking into other options that could be more cost effective


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,014 ✭✭✭✭ mahoney_j


    anyone have much experience of red clover?.the silage ground here hasn't been reseeded since 2005 and the more traditional lower feed value grasses have now taken over, have been thinking about getting red clover stitched into next spring..im wondering could this be done with spraying off old grass or whats the best way of doing it do people find?

    Full reseed better job ,red clover makes great silage and saves on n but if your planning on grazing this ground don’t bother with it as it dosnt stand up to any sort of grazing damage ,it’ll thrive in fertile ground where 3 cuts silage taken and maby a z graze in spring /autumn


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,158 ✭✭✭ Cavanjack


    Would you try Disc, Harrow and sow it. Much easier than the plough in storey ground anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 789 ✭✭✭ weatherbyfoxer


    ground here takes drought most summers,so from the but from the bit of research im doing clover seem to do well in those conditions


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  • Registered Users Posts: 23,802 ✭✭✭✭ Reggie.


    Cavanjack wrote: »
    Would you try Disc, Harrow and sow it. Much easier than the plough in storey ground anyway.

    If going that route and if its silage ground then make sure its disced half to death. If not the crows will pull up the scraws and it will come in on the silage


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,802 ✭✭✭✭ Reggie.


    555810.jpg
    This is a high clover mix that I sowed about a month ago for the BIL


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,158 ✭✭✭ Cavanjack


    Reggie. wrote: »
    This is a high clover mix that I sowed about a month ago for the BIL

    Great looking job. Very clean looking, doesn’t seem to be a weed in it. Is it for grazing?


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,802 ✭✭✭✭ Reggie.


    Cavanjack wrote: »
    Great looking job. Very clean looking, doesn’t seem to be a weed in it. Is it for grazing?

    It's a silage mix


  • Registered Users Posts: 789 ✭✭✭ weatherbyfoxer


    Reggie. wrote: »
    This is a high clover mix that I sowed about a month ago for the BIL

    have you much experience of stiching in clover with your machine reggie?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 23,802 ✭✭✭✭ Reggie.


    have you much experience of stiching in clover with your machine reggie?

    White over is OK as its capulised but red clover can be hard to get to establish as it is a naked seed


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,096 ✭✭✭ GrasstoMilk


    Reggie. wrote: »
    White over is OK as its capulised but red clover can be hard to get to establish as it is a naked seed

    Is the agritech one not coated?
    We stiched red clover into silage ground a month ago
    The red clover was up in 5 days


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,802 ✭✭✭✭ Reggie.


    Is the agritech one not coated?
    We stiched red clover into silage ground a month ago
    The red clover was up in 5 days

    Yeah but it's not got a capsule around it like the white clover. It's very open to environmental conditions. Great growth the last while hence you got the good strike.


  • Registered Users Posts: 789 ✭✭✭ weatherbyfoxer


    Is the agritech one not coated?
    We stiched red clover into silage ground a month ago
    The red clover was up in 5 days

    did you spray off the grass first?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,096 ✭✭✭ GrasstoMilk


    did you spray off the grass first?

    No left the existing sward in it
    It it to thr clay though to give new grass and clover a chance

    That was it at 3.5 weeks sown


  • Registered Users Posts: 789 ✭✭✭ weatherbyfoxer


    No left the existing sward in it
    It it to thr clay though to give new grass and clover a chance

    That was it at 3.5 weeks sown

    looks great,what sort of clover/grass seed mix did you put in?


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,802 ✭✭✭✭ Reggie.


    No left the existing sward in it
    It it to thr clay though to give new grass and clover a chance

    That was it at 3.5 weeks sown

    Look at the cut of them hands


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,096 ✭✭✭ GrasstoMilk


    Reggie. wrote: »
    Look at the cut of them hands

    Thats what working hands look like ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,096 ✭✭✭ GrasstoMilk


    looks great,what sort of clover/grass seed mix did you put in?

    This from agritech


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,155 ✭✭✭ Castlekeeper


    The thing with red clover is that it is expected to do a lot when people go there, and it needs particular agronomy in order for it to be successful. Coupled with this, persistence is an issue as it doesn't tiller, so good establishment and development of a high % of red clover is paramount to its success as a crop for the next 3-5 years.
    The best way to ensure this is a full reseed, taking the existing sward out of the equation.
    When established, less than 50% red clover in summer carries a risk of being a waste of time and money being neither here nor there.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 19,015 ✭✭✭✭ Water John


    This would be a great time to reseed with clover, temp low in the spring. Be sure to mow the red clover crop high and as little disturbance as possible, no conditioner on the mower, super silage feed.
    As a bonus for sheep farmers it's supposed to significantly increase lambing rate. Reality is it will last about 4 years and need to be sown again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,096 ✭✭✭ GrasstoMilk


    4.5 weeks sown
    Delighted with how it's took


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,990 ✭✭✭ Mooooo


    A trip to solohead may be worth it for those interested in clover


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,027 Mod ✭✭✭✭ blue5000


    Mooooo wrote: »
    A trip to solohead may be worth it for those interested in clover

    It is, until you find out that Solohead farm was originally a sludge dump for Tipp co-op cheese plant. Let's just say the P&K levels are very good. Having said that they have done a fantastic job draining the land as well.

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 2,273 Mod ✭✭✭✭ K.G.


    Doing a little research on red clover/italian with a view to putting one particular silage block under it and cutting it 3 to 4 times a year.the idea is that the nitrogen saved could be used on home block and maybe get a higher protein feed in later cuts.looking back here some lads tried it back through the year and wondering how yye got on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,990 ✭✭✭ Mooooo


    Some say putting in prg instead of Italian is better as more persistent. I'll see if I can find a mix one crowd were putting in, red and white clover along with prg. No experience myself now


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,027 Mod ✭✭✭✭ blue5000


    Mooooo wrote: »
    Some say putting in prg instead of Italian is better as more persistent. I'll see if I can find a mix one crowd were putting in, red and white clover along with prg. No experience myself now

    Did half rate irg/red clover + half rate prg and white clover in half a field with just red clover and irg in the other half last year. Docks are terrible in the half and half but cows much prefer grazing it. I think it's very hard to graze red clover, it just won't last. It's bare at the moment, but will try get pics up later on.

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



  • Registered Users Posts: 19,015 ✭✭✭✭ Water John


    Red clover isn't going to last in grazing. Once it's severed below the first node by the animal it will die. Mainly for use in 3/4 cut silage with a light grazing in the spring and autumn.
    Main problem with Italian is that with out weather you can get caught with a cutting date quite easily and it will go to seed, rapidly.

    If the red clover is gone, you could try giving it a scratch with a harrow and scattering some red clover and rolling it in.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,934 ✭✭✭ Gawddawggonnit


    K.G. wrote: »
    Doing a little research on red clover/italian with a view to putting one particular silage block under it and cutting it 3 to 4 times a year.the idea is that the nitrogen saved could be used on home block and maybe get a higher protein feed in later cuts.looking back here some lads tried it back through the year and wondering how yye got on.

    Hmmm.
    I’d a good chat with a relative yesterday evening. He’s tillage and dairy. He updated me on farming news...
    He made a very valid point about nitrates. The dogs on the street know that the majority of nitrate leaching comes from the ‘milking platform’, however dairy farmers/Teagasc/Dept are well aware of this and are quite willing to throw all farmers under the nitrates bus. That’s wrong in so many ways.
    It’s obvious from your post that you’re going to use the old ‘rob Peter to pay Paul’ craic, to hold onto the N for the MP. That’s irresponsible of you in fairness. Remember everyone suffers because of the few...


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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 2,273 Mod ✭✭✭✭ K.G.


    Hmmm.
    I’d a good chat with a relative yesterday evening. He’s tillage and dairy. He updated me on farming news...
    He made a very valid point about nitrates. The dogs on the street know that the majority of nitrate leaching comes from the ‘milking platform’, however dairy farmers/Teagasc/Dept are well aware of this and are quite willing to throw all farmers under the nitrates bus. That’s wrong in so many ways.
    It’s obvious from your post that you’re going to use the old ‘rob Peter to pay Paul’ craic, to hold onto the N for the MP. That’s irresponsible of you in fairness. Remember everyone suffers because of the few...
    What you seem to have missed is that i realise we have to change.i m just looking for ways to adapt gradually and the red clover strikes me as a potential option on that road.clover on the grazing ground presents alot of challenges and is very long term thing.the red clover for silage option seems to me to be more straight foward and 2nd and subsequent cuts could potentially have a higher protein feed and make us less reliant on imported gm soya.just trying to go in the right direction but it seems it does not pass the test.btw tillage days of feeding animal's could be numbered


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