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Schools and Covid 19 (part 5) **Mod warnings in OP**

  • #2
    Administrators, Social & Fun Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 54,915 admin Beasty


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    Mod Warnings

    1. Shouldn't need to say this, but unfortunately too many of you seem to ignore a very basic principle when posting - remain civil to each other, otherwise you will have posting privileges removed

    2. Can we not have the roundabout question of putting teachers on PUP every 10 pages or so please. You know the answer to the question so why bother asking it

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Comments

  • #2


    As a parent am all for those in essential work (like schools) & who cant SD getting the vaccine before me who WFM. No issue & yes would be mad if by September we told schools cant open because young teachers not done. But I obviously have a bit more faith in the vaccine roll out though & do feel that anyone who wants it will have it before September.
    I think promising teachers they would be ahead of Joe Public to get them back to school & rolling back on it is a bit **** though I didn't realise this. I do hope they'll say teachers can be in group 9 - or the crowded settings group whatever you call it.


  • #2


    It's the manner in which all was changed with a pen stroke is the shameful bit. Dreadful stuff.
    January proved you don't just make landmark decisions without consulting and explaining the reasons first.


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    As an SNA we where promised priority as part of our returning to work agreement. Not one bit surprised that's gone out the window again, ****ing joke. Have they removed the stipulation of keeping pregnant teachers/staff out of school yet? Because that's certainly coming as well.


  • #2


    TheDriver wrote: »
    It's the manner in which all was changed with a pen stroke is the shameful bit. Dreadful stuff.
    January proved you don't just make landmark decisions without consulting and explaining the reasons first.
    They have explained it and it's really not sudden, it will be May/June before we get all the at risks groups done anyway.

    https://www.thejournal.ie/niac-vaccine-recommendations-5397171-Mar2021/


  • #2


    The special schools opened first (admittedly very shortly before midterm) and units in mainstream schools shortly after. This was because it was recognised the valuable part they play in the lives of those children and their families. Many of those students cannot social distance and the staff are required to be in close proximity and some even provide intimate care.

    If the service they provide is that invaluable that they are back first (weeks before some students and months before others) then all staff working in special schools and units should be vaccinated as a priority group.


  • #2


    I'd actually be fine with that. I'm not concerned about myself but I think teachers in special schools and SNAs are not only at risk themselves but cana pass it to vunerabke children. Anything we can do to stop that. It's galling. I've several friends vaccinated and none would be around even a fraction of the number of people most teachers are around.


  • #2






    Oh yeah forgot the virus doesn't hit the older parents at home more exposed to covid than 30 year old.


  • #2


    Look at that. Last week, from 6,538 tests after close contact testing undertaken in educational facilities following notification to Departments of Public Health of a confirmed case of Covid-19 who had attended a facility during the infectious time period, less than 2% tested positive. That's less than 1 in 50 of those exposed to an infectious student or teacher.
    It truly is starting to look like the safe school mantra is actually true

    548768.JPG


    Also in the 2 weeks to the 30th of MArch, Karen Central Alerting parents of outbreaks in Schools reported cases in 270 schools, in the week from the 19th to the 26th there was contact tracing testing in 257 schools.


  • #2


    raind wrote: »
    Look at that. Last week, from 6,538 tests after close contact testing undertaken in educational facilities following notification to Departments of Public Health of a confirmed case of Covid-19 who had attended a facility during the infectious time period, less than 2% tested positive. That's less than 1 in 50 of those exposed to an infectious student or teacher.
    It truly is starting to look like the safe school mantra is actually true

    548768.JPG


    Also in the 2 weeks to the 30th of MArch, Karen Central Alerting parents of outbreaks in Schools reported cases in 270 schools, in the week from the 19th to the 26th there was contact tracing testing in 257 schools.

    2nd level missing 1st-4th years, they'd want to be safe. An argument for alternate weeks as many proposed on here.


  • #2


    TheDriver wrote: »
    It's the manner in which all was changed with a pen stroke is the shameful bit. Dreadful stuff.
    January proved you don't just make landmark decisions without consulting and explaining the reasons first.
    It really is the only way to manage a pandemic like this. Leave it open to consultation and nothing gets done, with everyone making themselves out to be special cases

    It's proven most effective elsewhere. I would imagine one of the major benefits when they talk about "efficiency" is it takes a lot of pressure off the health service in terms of patient care. But not only that, it avoids debate/argument over who fits in which consort and who's turn is it next and indeed arguments like the one surrounding the Beacon fiasco

    And I will freely acknowledge this pushes me massively up the list, but that is not the issue for me. I suspect I'm amongst the fittest for my age group (although equally my health has suffered through accident and injury, with me due back in the Sports Surgery Clinic tomorrow for what will be my 5th procedure in just over 6 months). A lot of other people my age will be at much higher risk than those in their 20s or 30s in the teaching profession. Of course those in their 50s and 60s will probably move up the list


  • #2


    raind wrote: »
    It truly is starting to look like the safe schools mantra is actually true

    Sure they are safe. Wanna buy a bridge?


  • #2


    Sure they are safe. Wanna buy a bridge?

    So they are hiding the positive tests from an average of 24 tests per school outbreak?


  • #2


    I'm not so pushed about being moved down the list, personally I feel it's the right choice, I'm not likely to even be I'll, nevermind very ill. The only issue I see is keeping schools open. Like the ICU beds the chronic underfunding of education and the lack of substitutes will lead to closures. My argument for possible vaccination in urban areas would be purely logistical and to avoid closures. Should be ok at secondary but primary might end up with rolling class closures.


  • #2


    The special schools opened first (admittedly very shortly before midterm) and units in mainstream schools shortly after. This was because it was recognised the valuable part they play in the lives of those children and their families. Many of those students cannot social distance and the staff are required to be in close proximity and some even provide intimate care.

    If the service they provide is that invaluable that they are back first (weeks before some students and months before others) then all staff working in special schools and units should be vaccinated as a priority group.

    I agree 100% A bit too late for us though as my daughter brought it home from her special school. Now we are all positive.


  • #2


    Knine wrote: »
    I agree 100% A bit too late for us though as my daughter brought it home from her special school. Now we are all positive.

    That's tough. Hope you are all ok.


  • #2


    TheTorment wrote: »

    Macron had taken a very firm stance on keeping schools open but at the end of day its all about the numbers. Case numbers, hospital numbers and ICU capacity decide not political will. I really hope we do not experience this again.


  • #2


    Interesting development. Though I assume they know the Department of Education are unfamiliar with the term "immediately"

    https://twitter.com/FergalBowers/status/1377632676832800768?s=19


  • #2


    Interesting development. Though I assume they know the Department of Education are unfamiliar with the term "immediately"

    https://twitter.com/FergalBowers/status/1377632676832800768?s=19

    Who will administer them ?


  • #2


    People reporting on Twitter that 16 members of staff in a special needs school in Ireland have tested positive this week.


  • #2


    Tiredteach wrote: »
    People reporting on Twitter that 16 members of staff in a special needs school in Ireland have tested positive this week.

    Likely the same special needs school my daughter goes to. I actually got a call from a HSE Public Health Doctor about the situation!


  • #2


    Sorry to read your post Knine, I hope you and family are not too sick/feeling ok.

    Not saying it's ok to get/have it but I think were it here I'd be happier for us all to be in the same boat, at the same time, as trying to isolate from each other would be difficult.


  • #2


    Sorry to read your post Knine, I hope you and family are not too sick/feeling ok.

    Not saying it's ok to get/have it but I think were it here I'd be happier for us all to be in the same boat, at the same time, as trying to isolate from each other would be difficult.

    No isolating from a child with a lot of care needs! We are starting to hopefully come out the other side of it


  • #2


    Sorry to here that Knine, I'm sure you have enough on your plate. Hopefully you all feel better soon.

    In the current climate I actually don't know how you and other parents have coped, it's a real stricking juxtaposition between parents doing everything with so few supports and consultants putting vaccines in their pockets. Ye are phenomenal


  • #2


    So sorry to hear that Knine hope your all doing ok.

    Irish Times reporting that CRC in Clontarf a special schools has 15 positive cases.

    Not asking you to identify if this is your daughters school but worrying if it's not and it's another outbreak!

    Disgraceful that staff in special schools are not receiving priority for vaccines.

    They are always going to be at higher risk of catching it, your can't social distance in a special school.


  • #2


    Knine wrote: »
    I agree 100% A bit too late for us though as my daughter brought it home from her special school. Now we are all positive.

    SET here, I'm so sorry to read that this has been visited on your family and wish you all the best outcome possible.


  • #2


    raind wrote: »
    Look at that. Last week, from 6,538 tests after close contact testing undertaken in educational facilities following notification to Departments of Public Health of a confirmed case of Covid-19 who had attended a facility during the infectious time period, less than 2% tested positive. That's less than 1 in 50 of those exposed to an infectious student or teacher.
    It truly is starting to look like the safe school mantra is actually true

    548768.JPG


    Also in the 2 weeks to the 30th of MArch, Karen Central Alerting parents of outbreaks in Schools reported cases in 270 schools, in the week from the 19th to the 26th there was contact tracing testing in 257 schools.

    Contact tracing is exceptionally hit and miss, in many cases those who would be designated as close contacts anywhere else are not deemed to be so in schools. Like "mass testing" "pods" and "bubbles" it sounds so very reassuring whilst being completely without meaning in schools.

    As to "schools are safe" there is quite a lot of anecdotal reporting of HSE officials trying to tie people in knots so that an outbreak/ cases will not be deemed as school linked.


  • #2


    Contact tracing is exceptionally hit and miss, in many cases those who would be designated as close contacts anywhere else are not deemed to be so in schools. Like "mass testing" "pods" and "bubbles" it sounds so very reassuring whilst being completely without meaning in schools.

    As to "schools are safe" there is quite a lot of anecdotal reporting of HSE officials trying to tie people in knots so that an outbreak/ cases will not be deemed as school linked.

    And yet we have data here showing 25 test per school where contact tracing was carried out


  • #2


    Beasty wrote: »
    It really is the only way to manage a pandemic like this. Leave it open to consultation and nothing gets done, with everyone making themselves out to be special cases

    It's proven most effective elsewhere. I would imagine one of the major benefits when they talk about "efficiency" is it takes a lot of pressure off the health service in terms of patient care. But not only that, it avoids debate/argument over who fits in which consort and who's turn is it next and indeed arguments like the one surrounding the Beacon fiasco
    The best way of doing it, and the way nobody in this entire country even mentions, is to do entire regions at a go as a lottery. That way, whole areas could go back to normal at the same time and relative economic normality could resume. Also it would make it less likely that virus would mutate in the portion of the population who aren't vaccinated as they mingle with those who are.

    But that just makes way too much sense, and it would get rid of the fighting and bickering which is making us too busy to direct our energy at the tyrannical and sick ruling regime we're currently oppressed by.


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