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Working from home and future of city centres

  • 17-01-2021 7:55pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,414 ✭✭✭ jkforde


    If a lot of people choose to opt to work from home post-pandemic, what'll that do to the city centre? that's a lot of cash not being spent in the centre not to mention just the presence of people milling around.. what's the centre going to look and feel like in 5 - 10 years? what opportunities could it enable? just curious what's going to transpire


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 791 ✭✭✭ westgolf


    jkforde wrote: »
    If a lot of people choose to opt to work from home post-pandemic, what'll that do to the city centre? that's a lot of cash not being spent in the centre not to mention just the presence of people milling around.. what's the centre going to look and feel like in 5 - 10 years? what opportunities could it enable? just curious what's going to transpire

    Just my 2c worth but I think you have to take a look at what the streets were like before covid-19 came in. 20 or 30 years ago we had streets with distinct business, many family owned and operated. Now, if you take shop street as an example, we have a collection of mobile phone shops and souvenir outlets.
    Definitely will be opportunities going forward but a program of tax breaks and incentives will be needed, primarily to revitalize the streets and then to encourage development.


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators Posts: 81,470 Mod ✭✭✭✭ biko


    It's anybody's guess really.

    Lots of smaller shops will have been killed off by the covid restrictions.
    High street shops will probably be ok, they have larger reserves.

    But, once all this blows over things will be back to normal. Remember that the much much deadlier 1918 pandemic only lasted two years.


  • Registered Users Posts: 56 ✭✭ ThePentagon


    biko wrote: »
    Lots of smaller shops will have been killed off by the covid restrictions.
    High street shops will probably be ok, they have larger reserves.

    Not necessarily, if Edward Sq is anything to go by.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,065 ✭✭✭ Wompa1


    I was already working 100% from home and opted to rent an office in the city. It wouldn't surprise me if co-working spaces become popular.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,501 ✭✭✭ Outkast_IRE


    A Cork man posting here , as I seen the topic on the main page . The revitalisation of village , town and city centres is going to be dependent on turning the central areas back into living cities where people can both live , work and shop . The days of a shopping only district are dead , the best way to encourage it is approving high quality city centre accomodation that is not allowed of be used for air b&b or similar .

    For a lot of people in their 20s and maybe when they get older again they would love to be in the heart of the city.

    Part of this will not just be accomodation but making the central areas , pedestrian friendly , minimise air pollution and improve on street dining etc. Taking back these areas from the cars that are just passing through or only in for a monthly shop .


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  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators Posts: 81,470 Mod ✭✭✭✭ biko


    Scope of thread is bigger than Galway city, moved to Corona forum.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,909 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    The demise of city centres will likely hit pension funds who have invested in office buildings that no staff now occupy.
    Cant see leases on these being a very valuable asset.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,357 ✭✭✭ jacdaniel2014


    Working from home is going to have a lot more detrimental impacts on society than people realise.

    What happens if companies don’t really bother to hire Irish anymore? Surely a person in Poland or India could do the same job from their home?

    There are a million other things that will be impacted. Surrounding businesses such as cafes and pubs, Cleaners, window cleaners, maintenance workers, vending machines, office supplies, just a few off the very top of my head.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,501 ✭✭✭ Outkast_IRE


    To date no company i know of is looking at reducing their city centre office accomodation. What they are actively looking at is changing it over to more of a hot desk type environment where people can come and go alot easier than previous. So they can have more staff than before in a smaller space as they are not all there concurrently.

    For alot of industries we are dealing with people in their 40s,50s and 60s who are at high level in management and they have an expectation of meeting rooms and office space to be available


  • Registered Users Posts: 639 ✭✭✭ Thats me


    What happens if companies don’t really bother to hire Irish anymore? Surely a person in Poland or India could do the same job from their home?

    But they were already doing this way before Covid. And these two locations locations are too expensive comparing to Africa or Indonesia. But if companies by some reason were interested in local hires in areas where job can be done remotely.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 18,290 ✭✭✭✭ El_Duderino 09


    I think city centres will be a lot less busy but I don’t think that’s necessarily a bad thing. There could be much more vibrant suburban and rural towns. The convention of loads fo people having to cram into the city centre and then cram back out every evening, competition for housing and business premises sending rents Sky high, was never done because it was good. It was done because it was necessary.

    Now I think we have the opportunity to rethink how to structure the whole thing. Working from home will mean people can live where they want and only go to the office a few days a week or month. That means they won’t buy as many coffees and some Costas will close. boo-hoo for Costa - but I do care about the employees who will need support to move or train for other jobs.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,501 ✭✭✭ Outkast_IRE


    The trick for villages will be to allow the provision of serviced estates walking distance to the village , where each plot of land in the serviced estate can be built on with individual designs. Very common in other EU countries and a few of these can bring life back into any village.

    I think there was a segment on eco eye or similar a few weeks back and it was very interesting. With the huge boost in working from home, these serviced sites in estates walking distance to village centres are the way forward to arrest population decline in rural ireland.

    This will lend itself to efficent roll out of broadband, elec, gas & wastewater .


  • Registered Users Posts: 588 ✭✭✭ you2008


    Working from home is going to have a lot more detrimental impacts on society than people realise.

    What happens if companies don’t really bother to hire Irish anymore? Surely a person in Poland or India could do the same job from their home?
    Are you saying companies hire Irish because of working from office, what is your logic ……:rolleyes: It is a bit toooo late to worried about hire India for IT back up as most of comanies have done already.


  • Registered Users Posts: 22,334 ✭✭✭✭ Dyr


    jkforde wrote: »
    If a lot of people choose to opt to work from home post-pandemic, what'll that do to the city centre? that's a lot of cash not being spent in the centre not to mention just the presence of people milling around.. what's the centre going to look and feel like in 5 - 10 years? what opportunities could it enable? just curious what's going to transpire

    People may able to afford to live in city centres again, instead of them just being full of coffee shops and office blocks

    Quite possibly the end of civilisation as we know it, Fionnbharr.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,611 ✭✭✭✭ silverharp


    I think office parks will suffer more than city centres, if anyone had the misfortune of commuting from Carlow to City West everyday, the thought of doing it again will cause them PTSD

    A belief in gender identity involves a level of faith as there is nothing tangible to prove its existence which, as something divorced from the physical body, is similar to the idea of a soul. - Colette Colfer



  • Registered Users Posts: 808 ✭✭✭ 2lazytogetup


    City center will have tourism . still have museums, concerts.

    And if there are tourists, concerts and parks you will have restaurants.

    I cant see retailing changing much though. no one in Dublin anyway goes into center Dublin to buy a washing machine or a fridge.

    only small change i see will be offices. People will want to get back to the office for 2 or 3 days a week, so they might get a bit smaller.
    Still have them, just wont be as big. and anyway pre covid, offices were moving out anyway cause of high rents.
    People will want to get back to teh office for 2 or 3 days a week, so they might get a bit smaller.

    Rents will stay high, cause come September 2021, we are going to have a massive economic boom. people are itching to go out, to go spend,

    So OP, i see little change.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,095 ✭✭✭ cgcsb


    City Centres are already more leisure focused than at any stage in the past and there's a proliferation of apartment building in the docks area where the bulk of modern offices are, so these areas will probably become more lively than they are currently. You might see some of the 'offices' in the georgian core of the city revert to other uses, perhaps fancy period style apartments. I'd expect the leisurification of city centres to increase. More pedestrianisation schemes and generally calmer environments. I do think offices will fill back up again, even with people wfh 2 or 3 days a week economic growth will fill the space, nature abhorrs a vacuum.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,531 ✭✭✭✭ average_runner


    Offices will have a younger vibe to it and a better social scene for them.


    Older group will continue to work from home 3 days or more a week.
    Local shops will do well now.


    It could bring house prices down in Dublin City also as more look to move from Dublin, something we are thinking about


  • Registered Users Posts: 639 ✭✭✭ Thats me


    Older group will continue to work from home 3 days or more a week.
    Local shops will do well now.

    Wy the hell we, older group, will be back to office for one or two days a week while logical extension of WFH is WFS (Work From Spain) ? ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,641 ✭✭✭ mohawk


    Thats me wrote: »
    Wy the hell we, older group, will be back to office for one or two days a week while logical extension of WFH is WFS (Work From Spain) ? ;)

    Would there be tax implications there for either the employers or employee if some of the staff decided to work abroad.

    Would transfer of data be an issue and things like software licenses etc.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,357 ✭✭✭ jacdaniel2014


    you2008 wrote: »
    Are you saying companies hire Irish because of working from office, what is your logic ……:rolleyes: It is a bit toooo late to worried about hire India for IT back up as most of comanies have done already.

    Well, a lot of companies hire people from the country they are based in as it’s always been normal to physically go to an office.

    I am aware that lots of work has been outsourced to cheaper locations.

    Imagine if all jobs could be given to people in cheaper locations.

    IMO, that wouldn’t be good for us.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,124 ✭✭✭ tobefrank321


    City centres are over rated.

    Dublin city becomes a ghost town once rush hour is over, and all you have/had is tourists in the main in the evening. It similar in other cities too.

    City centres should be more than about jobs and the rat race they've become.


  • Registered Users Posts: 639 ✭✭✭ Thats me


    mohawk wrote: »
    Would there be tax implications there for either the employers or employee if some of the staff decided to work abroad.

    Would transfer of data be an issue and things like software licenses etc.

    There should be no big issue with it within EU. Taxes are paid in the country where person was working most of the time during a year. May be can create additional complexity for the company's own reporting.

    Data transfer may be an issue in some cases, but there should not be a problem with commercial data within Union since all countries have same GDPR legislation. Never saw software licence linked to particular country, if this the case then this may be a reason to consider using software with less restrictive licensing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,006 ✭✭✭ eviltimeban


    I have a feeling that it won't be long before things are the way they were. In other words, people back in offices.

    For the first while, sure, there'll be the option to "work from home", but (and especially) with younger / lower ranking office staff, they'll soon be "encouraged" to be in the office more / all the time, so they can be kept an eye on number one, but also because companies have all this space and they won't want it to be not used.

    Plus, younger workers will miss out on the after-work social life, so they'll want to get back to having that. And many large multi-nationals give them free food, all day long. They'll want that back too.

    I'd say it'll be the older workers / those with kids / management generation who'll take the opportunity to WFH and will be allowed to more.

    Personally I can see myself going into the office maybe 2 / 5 days of the week. My role is client facing so it's likely I'll be out and about anyway. I still like the city centre (Dublin), am fed up making my own lunch everyday, and I miss being able to pop uptown to the shops at lunchtime.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 40,086 ✭✭✭✭ Harry Palmr


    "Living over the shop" concept has been revived thanks to the Living City initiative.

    Here in Waterford the Michael Street part of the North Quays Development has been refocused from shopping to living & leisure/tourism.

    Centres have been in declining for years in piecemeal fashion and we all knew it but it's taken Covid to focus proper attention on what a city centre is for.

    It's for people not chain shops and the cars they usually attract.

    People will be working in the centre but it'll be a different profile over time, the proverbial "shoeshine boys" will have different customers.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 81 ✭✭✭ emmalynn19


    City centres are over rated.

    Dublin city becomes a ghost town once rush hour is over, and all you have/had is tourists in the main in the evening.


    Uh, what? Pre-covid Dublin was buzzing every night of the week.


    We need to re-focus cities to cater for the people who live in them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 22,334 ✭✭✭✭ Dyr


    City centres are over rated.

    Dublin city becomes a ghost town once rush hour is over, and all you have/had is tourists in the main in the evening. It similar in other cities too.

    City centres should be more than about jobs and the rat race they've become.

    Dublin, Texas? Dublin was jammed regardless of the time prior to Covid, it was fkin awful


  • Registered Users Posts: 712 ✭✭✭ FrStone


    "Living over the shop" concept has been revived thanks to the Living City initiative.

    Here in Waterford the Michael Street part of the North Quays Development has been refocused from shopping to living & leisure/tourism.

    Centres have been in declining for years in piecemeal fashion and we all knew it but it's taken Covid to focus proper attention on what a city centre is for.

    It's for people not chain shops and the cars they usually attract.

    People will be working in the centre but it'll be a different profile over time, the proverbial "shoeshine boys" will have different customers.


    I was under the impression that the living city imitative was a bit of a failure due to there being such a low up take.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,522 ✭✭✭ copeyhagen


    turn the office blocks into apartments and sell them off.


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  • Moderators, Music Moderators Posts: 19,529 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Mr.S


    jkforde wrote: »
    If a lot of people choose to opt to work from home post-pandemic, what'll that do to the city centre? that's a lot of cash not being spent in the centre not to mention just the presence of people milling around.. what's the centre going to look and feel like in 5 - 10 years? what opportunities could it enable? just curious what's going to transpire

    Offices are going no where, very very very few employers are going to go remote only due to COVID. Most will either offer a more flexible hybrid policy, or just go back to everyone on-site again. At this rate, it's likely 2021 will still be a year of restrictions, but I can see things going back to normal by 2022.

    If anything the likes of WeWork and other co-working office spaces will rise in demand as smaller employers don't need or want everyone on-site at the same time.


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