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Does Owning A Gun Attract Burglars

  • 14-12-2020 10:42am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 246 ✭✭ paul7g


    Hi,

    I'm relatively new to the sport of shooting and i'm currently going through the process of joining a club and then hopefully owning my first fire arm.

    I've mentioned it to a few friends and family over the last number of weeks, and everyone's first comment back was the above... literally everyone.

    I'm aware that there are a number of gangs that do try obtain fire arms through this means, but on the other side, I think the idea of trying to steal a fire arm from someone who has a fire arm is equally daft.

    Interested to hear people's opinions on this who have much more experience than me. Thanks for your help.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 246 ✭✭ paul7g


    "Thinly veiled "I'm a burglar looking to rob a gun" thread" - You got me :-)

    As much as I want to get into the sport, this is playing on my mind slightly, especially considering it has been everyone's initial comment. I really don't want to find myself in this situation.

    Surely this is something that everyone has had to weigh up?


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,334 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45


    Yeah burglars have this inbuilt natural detector to know which house have guns in them....Of course if you go and blab to your entire friend and relatives circle that you own one expect it to eventually land up being picked up by the wrong people.
    They are opportunists and will take one if it is available and unsecured like anything else of high value.
    However,those who have been interviewed in jail about their criminal life have stated they will avoid a house that they know is occupied by a gunowner in residence.For obvious reasons.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 35 ✭✭✭ kjl412


    I honestly don't get this question, not trying to be rude. The part I don't get is; why or how would any would be burglar knows you own a gun? No one except my family know I own guns and obviously some people in the gun club. I don't go posting all over social media that I own a gun, like I don't see how you think a burglar will just know this guy has a gun lets rob him. I think that these "gangs" you're talking about are A LOT more likely to import illegal guns than to go around houses looking for the odd O/U shotgun, the situation your giving here just seems so unrealistic as long as your not a total idiot.


  • Registered Users Posts: 246 ✭✭ paul7g


    kjl412 wrote: »
    I honestly don't get this question, not trying to be rude. The part I don't get is; why or how would any would be burglar knows you own a gun? No one except my family know I own guns and obviously some people in the gun club. I don't go posting all over social media that I own a gun, like I don't see how you think a burglar will just know this guy has a gun lets rob him. I think that these "gangs" you're talking about are A LOT more likely to import illegal guns than to go around houses looking for the odd O/U shotgun, the situation your giving here just seems so unrealistic as long as your not a total idiot.

    Not rude at all. It's a genuine concern I have, but I have been somewhat relived that it is not a concern of others. Maybe I am being paranoid, but the fact that it was a common comment did worry me.

    Our Financial Controller in work had his jeep broken into, in our company car park. The guy was caught and was well know to the guards, and it transpired he broke into his jeep looking for his hunting riffle.

    I'm sure it doesn't take much to follow someone home from a gun club... however the lack of concern from the people in this thread has put me at ease, thank you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 473 ✭✭ The pigeon man


    Honestly the biggest cause of you getting robbed is a nice car or two in the driveway. You're displaying a high value asset to thieves and they probably think that there's nice stuff to take inside the house.

    But nobody will ever tell you that having a nice car will increase your chances of your house robbed.

    With guns the general population perceives them as high risk due to the media and will automatically say that your house will be robbed.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,184 ✭✭✭✭ BattleCorp


    Tell fcukall people that you have a gun. Then there should be no problem. Most of us hide the gun safe where it won't be easily found. I've a monitored alarm on the house too which helps.

    In reality not many guns are stolen when you consider there is about 200k of them out there.

    If there was a high risk of your firearm being stolen, the Gardai wouldn't let you have it in the first place.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    BattleCorp wrote: »
    Tell fcukall people that you have a gun. Then there should be no problem. Most of us hide the gun safe where it won't be easily found. I've a monitored alarm on the house too which helps.

    In reality not many guns are stolen when you consider there is about 200k of them out there.

    If there was a high risk of your firearm being stolen, the Gardai wouldn't let you have it in the first place.

    I don't agree with that. Its not your fault that you might be a victim of a criminal offence. A garda tryed this guilt-trip horse- sh1t on me when i was got the licence for the glock years ago. My response was why should i be penalised for the crimes of someone else.

    Its not the garda's fault either really, its the revolving door - slap on the wrist - property is theft - looney leftie justice system we have here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 457 ✭✭ Asus1


    paul7g wrote: »
    Hi,

    I'm relatively new to the sport of shooting and i'm currently going through the process of joining a club and then hopefully owning my first fire arm.

    I've mentioned it to a few friends and family over the last number of weeks, and everyone's first comment back was the above... literally everyone.

    I'm aware that there are a number of gangs that do try obtain fire arms through this means, but on the other side, I think the idea of trying to steal a fire arm from someone who has a fire arm is equally daft.

    Interested to hear people's opinions on this who have much more experience than me. Thanks for your help.

    I would say most of the yokes that break into your home are not interested or would know if you had firearms.If one was stuck under the bed and they seen it they would probably take it,but thats just because they are there to nick stuff and the firearm is added to the tv,jewellery etc.
    If your average scrote wants a gun to rob a petrol station or local shop they will more than likely have bought a replica airsoft handgun for €100 which are impossible to make out that they are not real in a robbery situation when its being pointed at you.I held a glock replica a good while back,it was made of metal with a blowback action it looked and felt 100% like a proper pistol.


  • Registered Users Posts: 246 ✭✭ paul7g


    Thanks for all of the help. I'm much more at ease, thank you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 759 ✭✭✭ freddieot


    I've had guns for 20 years and never had an issue. I do keep it quiet though. Normally only tell a few colleagues at work, family and friends. No stickers on car, no on line posting pictures of me with my toys etc.

    I now a couple of firearms dealers that were burgled over the years but I can't really understand why anyone would go breaking into a house looking for one rifle or a shotgun. It's not worth the risk.

    I think this robbery thing is just one of those reactions that people make out of lack of knowledge.

    I remember one time I brought a young guy shooting with us and his Mother was worried he might get shot by accident on the range. The drive down in his car was the only things that could have killed any of us :D


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,293 ✭✭✭ TheBoyConor


    tudderone wrote: »
    I don't agree with that. Its not your fault that you might be a victim of a criminal offence. A garda tryed this guilt-trip horse- sh1t on me when i was got the licence for the glock years ago. My response was why should i be penalised for the crimes of someone else.

    Its not the garda's fault either really, its the revolving door - slap on the wrist - property is theft - looney leftie justice system we have here.

    At least it is more of a reason behind a Guard saying that than what a lot of Supers say when they see something that isn't a side by side or a 202 - "I don't like the look of it" "sure why would you need that?"


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    freddieot wrote: »
    I've had guns for 20 years and never had an issue. I do keep it quiet though. Normally only tell a few colleagues at work, family and friends. No stickers on car, no on line posting pictures of me with my toys etc.

    I now a couple of firearms dealers that were burgled over the years but I can't really understand why anyone would go breaking into a house looking for one rifle or a shotgun. It's not worth the risk.

    I think this robbery thing is just one of those reactions that people make out of lack of knowledge.

    I remember one time I brought a young guy shooting with us and his Mother was worried he might get shot by accident on the range. The drive down in his car was the only things that could have killed any of us :D


    Your average citizen knows as much about firearms as a three year old knows about nuclear fusion. Absolutely nothing. A few times i have had the gun out with people who may never have seen a firearm in the flesh before and the silly buzzwords flow "Assault weapon" "Hair trigger" "High powered".


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 134 ✭✭ Henryq.


    Information about who owns a gun can easily spread to a burglar gang

    The information is passed on by a local person


  • Registered Users Posts: 254 ✭✭ supersaint3


    MOD SNIP

    Just all kinds of NO.

    What absolute and total scutter


  • Registered Users Posts: 159 ✭✭ GooseB


    paul7g - In my opinion I really don't think you need worry. Less than 2 years ago I was like yourself, wanting to join a club and take up shooting. Now that I have I can honestly say that I don't have any excessive fears of burglary specifically because of the firearm. I'm just as likely to get burgled as the neighbours are, but not more so. The firearm is locked away and hidden, parts needed to operate it are kept separately again. I don't talk about it to the neighbours so none of them know there's a firearm in the house. Like a lot of things, common sense goes a long way. Take precautions, get a cabinet or safe and don't broadcast to the world you have a gun. I was talking a while ago to someone that currently holds or has in the past held national titles or records in certain disciplines and they told me that neighbours of 30 years don't even know he's into shooting.


  • Registered Users Posts: 546 ✭✭✭ crusier


    The are generally taken in burglaries when they are randomly discovered by burglers. Alot of criminals like to boast of having access to a firearm and hense they take them, they also have value as we know. Shotguns are normally sawn off and hidden / buried for access at a later stage, they are often swapped between criminals.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,184 ✭✭✭✭ BattleCorp


    paul7g wrote: »
    Interested to hear people's opinions on this who have much more experience than me. Thanks for your help.

    Lesson number one. As well as a lot of good information being posted here, a lot of sh1te is also talked on Boards.ie. This thread is an example of where there is good info and sh1te info.

    Good info = keep your mouth shut and don't advertise that you have guns.

    Bad info = the Provos are coming for your guns so that they can rob petrol stations and post offices or the Gardai will also steal your gun.


  • Registered Users Posts: 601 ✭✭✭ RandRuns


    This attitude comes from years ago, when provos used to hit houses that had guns in them. Nowadays, any scumbag that wants a gun can buy one in the same place he gets his drugs at practically zero risk. Most lads going at armed robbery or whatever wants a large-calibre pistol, or a semi-auto "assault rifle" like his heros on the TV have, not a bolt-action 22 or a double barrell shotgun.
    I haven't heard of a house being robbed for guns in years and years, since back in the 80's I'd say, before the drug dealers began importing them with their merchandise.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,573 ✭✭✭✭ mrcheez


    kjl412 wrote: »
    I honestly don't get this question, not trying to be rude. The part I don't get is; why or how would any would be burglar knows you own a gun? No one except my family know I own guns and obviously some people in the gun club. I don't go posting all over social media that I own a gun, like I don't see how you think a burglar will just know this guy has a gun lets rob him. I think that these "gangs" you're talking about are A LOT more likely to import illegal guns than to go around houses looking for the odd O/U shotgun, the situation your giving here just seems so unrealistic as long as your not a total idiot.

    Anyone could easily let slip that they have a gun through casual conversation, or maybe someone overhears you at a pub where you are with a group of fellow shooters?!?

    Pretty easy to see how a gun owner could be "outed".. genuinely misunderstanding how the OP's question isn't a valid concern :confused:


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 27,540 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Cass


    Jesus. H. Christ.

    Threads often go off topic, but this has to be a new record.

    It went from asking a seemingly genuine question about security to accusations of An Gardaí apparently being responsible for some sort of gun theft/smuggling ring.

    ENOUGH.

    I rarely do this, but when the thread is re-opened any post not related DIRECTLY TO THE TOPIC will be deleted and continued ignoring of this warning will lead to infraction(s) and/or bans if necessary.

    No more warnings.

    Forum Charter - Useful Information - RFDs - Ranges by County - Hunting Laws/Important threads


    If you see a problem post use the report post function, "FLAG" & let a Moderator deal with it.


    Your Shooting Forum Moderators - Cass, Cookimonster, Vegeta, Sparks, It wasn't me!



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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,174 ✭✭✭ J.R.


    BattleCorp wrote: »
    Tell fcukall people that you have a gun. Then there should be no problem. Most of us hide the gun safe where it won't be easily found. I've a monitored alarm on the house too which helps.

    Exactly - I also tell as few people as possible that I have firearms.
    I'd don't leave home in full camo - I carry the firearm in a case and discreetly bring the gear out to my car.

    Draw as little attention as possible to the fact that you do own a firearm.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,047 ✭✭✭ civdef


    I've heard of cases where burglars saw shotguns and left them where they were - too much hassle and way higher chance of jail if caught.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 27,540 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Cass


    The lads have given some really good advice and i strongly suggest you follow their direction regarding outward displays of gun ownership. We don't have to hide our sport from regular people, but you must protect your property and that means being discreet.

    On a separate but related point. There are laws in place that require minimum security criteria be in place before you can become a gun owner. Its all covered under SI 307/2009. This means you must meet whatever criteria the law sets out at a minimum, and this may be increased at the Super's discretion. Forgot for one minute the legal requirements its just good practice to make sure your firearms are securely stored when not in use. This means trigger locks, safes, and if necessary vital components placed in a separate storage area away from the firearm.

    Same when traveling. A locked gun case and ammunition storage container are now a legal requirement. Its also excellent practice to do so and you'll find most lads didn't have a big problem with this new law as most were already doing it before it was introduced.

    I won't bother repeating all the good advice above by the other lads but simple things can prevent prying eyes.

    Forum Charter - Useful Information - RFDs - Ranges by County - Hunting Laws/Important threads


    If you see a problem post use the report post function, "FLAG" & let a Moderator deal with it.


    Your Shooting Forum Moderators - Cass, Cookimonster, Vegeta, Sparks, It wasn't me!



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Cass wrote: »
    The lads have given some really good advice and i strongly suggest you follow their direction regarding outward displays of gun ownership. We don't have to hide our sport from regular people, but you must protect your property and that means being discreet.

    On a separate but related point. There are laws in place that require minimum security criteria be in place before you can become a gun owner. Its all covered under SI 307/2009. This means you must meet whatever criteria the law sets out at a minimum, and this may be increased at the Super's discretion. Forgot for one minute the legal requirements its just good practice to make sure your firearms are securely stored when not in use. This means trigger locks, safes, and if necessary vital components placed in a separate storage area away from the firearm.

    Same when traveling. A locked gun case and ammunition storage container are now a legal requirement. Its also excellent practice to do so and you'll find most lads didn't have a big problem with this new law as most were already doing it before it was introduced.

    I won't bother repeating all the good advice above by the other lads but simple things can prevent prying eyes.

    Aren't farmers exempt from locking up their shotguns though ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 437 ✭✭ JP22


    Keep your mouth shut, Its your business if you hold legally licensed firearms, no one else should know except a few trusted club members.

    Mouthing off and talking in the pub or elsewhere is asking for trouble.

    Know of a girl who posted on social media for a few weeks solid about going on holidays, sure enough, her house was done.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 27,540 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Cass


    tudderone wrote: »
    Aren't farmers exempt from locking up their shotguns though ?

    What?

    No.

    Where did you hear that?

    What made you think that?

    Nothing in any SI or Act specifically names ANYONE as being exempt from storage conditions. The Super may allow a simple trigger lock for a shotgun instead of a safe, but that is the minimum.

    BTW not trying to be a dick. If there is something i'm overlooking by all means share. I'm always open to correction and education.

    Forum Charter - Useful Information - RFDs - Ranges by County - Hunting Laws/Important threads


    If you see a problem post use the report post function, "FLAG" & let a Moderator deal with it.


    Your Shooting Forum Moderators - Cass, Cookimonster, Vegeta, Sparks, It wasn't me!



  • Registered Users Posts: 82 ✭✭ N1one


    paul7g wrote: »

    I think the idea of trying to steal a fire arm from someone who has a fire arm is equally daft.

    Sound to me like the only people to steal a fire arm from 🀣!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Cass wrote: »
    What?

    No.

    Where did you hear that?

    What made you think that?

    Nothing in any SI or Act specifically names ANYONE as being exempt from storage conditions. The Super may allow a simple trigger lock for a shotgun instead of a safe, but that is the minimum.

    BTW not trying to be a dick. If there is something i'm overlooking by all means share. I'm always open to correction and education.

    Wasn't that left in for farmers with a single shotgun ? Didn't the IFA look for a clause like that ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 35 ✭✭✭ kjl412


    tudderone wrote: »
    Wasn't that left in for farmers with a single shotgun ? Didn't the IFA look for a clause like that ?

    Yes not just farmers though anyone can have a single shotgun and only need a trigger lock and for it to be broken down and stored in separate places.


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  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 27,540 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Cass


    tudderone wrote: »
    Wasn't that left in for farmers with a single shotgun ? Didn't the IFA look for a clause like that ?

    Just so we're on the same page. When you say locking up do you mean left, in-functional-tact, ready to use in the hotpress or as i said earlier with a trigger lock, disassembled, and stored separately but not in a safe?

    If its the first then no. If its the second, yes, but its still part of SI308/2009 and the minimum requirement which is applicable to everyone, not just farmers.

    Forum Charter - Useful Information - RFDs - Ranges by County - Hunting Laws/Important threads


    If you see a problem post use the report post function, "FLAG" & let a Moderator deal with it.


    Your Shooting Forum Moderators - Cass, Cookimonster, Vegeta, Sparks, It wasn't me!



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