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Age 50 and want totally change career - ideas

  • 03-12-2020 1:38pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 5,368 ✭✭✭ JimmyVik


    I was having a few pints with my brother last night and we got to talking.
    He is 50 this year and works in IT. He said he is just tired of it and burnt out. I work at the same game and feel the same, so i know how he feels, but i'll stick at it another few years myself.

    But he said he just wants a totally different career. Nothing to do with IT.
    And he was looking for ideas of how to go about this, without going back to uni :). He reminded me he is 50 . Well I had none.

    Well I had one. Apply to the civil service and see if you can get a job there. I think they just place you in random jobs. Roll the dice and see what happens. But I dont even know if you can start in the civil service at 50 years of age tbh or how you would go about it.

    I think it was an interesting topic.

    So throwing it out to the good boardsies. What should he do? What can he do? Has anyone here ever changed career at 50?


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 162 ✭✭ Conqueror


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    Well I had one. Apply to the civil service and see if you can get a job there. I think they just place you in random jobs. Roll the dice and see what happens. But I dont even know if you can start in the civil service at 50 years of age tbh or how you would go about it.

    You can apply to the Civil Service at age 50, or even 55, 60 or 65 years of age, no problem. I know quite a few people who came into the Civil Service in their forties and fifties who loved it, and a couple of regretted it.

    www.publicjobs.ie lists all open competitions, is updated daily and tells you how to apply. You need an account on the site to apply for most competitions. In general competitions, successful applicants are assigned to a Department that needs a person at that grade. Your brother could get something completely new and random, but he could just as easily be assigned to an IT section.

    The Civil Service is wide-ranging and, for most people, a challenging and rewarding career. But it can be a stifling environment for people who don't like or are not used working within political constraints or the slow changes that come with an organisation that has some 40,000 people working across multiple departments and hundreds of locations across the country, some of whom were in the same role or Department in the 1970s. In addition, for anyone joining after 2013, the pay, pension and T&Cs aren't the goldmines "built at the expense the hard working private sector" nonsense peddled by the Irish Independent. Yes, there are annual increments, but the potential for a huge pay cut at the outset needs to be considered.

    If your brother is interested in working in the Civil Service, might I suggest he looks at the competencies for roles he might apply for. These can be found here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,905 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    IBut I dont even know if you can start in the civil service at 50 years of age tbh or how you would go about it.

    You can, and people do. The public service is one of the few options that don't discriminate on age. Others don't admit it, but they do.

    Otherwise homecare: males are scarce in the sector, so valued. But you're got to be a certain type of personality.

    Or self-employment.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,603 ✭✭✭ mr_edge_to_you


    You can, and people do. The public service is one of the few options that don't discriminate on age. Others don't admit it, but they do.

    Otherwise homecare: males are scarce in the sector, so valued. But you're got to be a certain type of personality.

    Or self-employment.

    Was going to suggest homecare too.

    I always think an Accounting Technician qualification is great for people looking to retrain. Part time and evenings spread over 2 years. Its a well recognised and respected qualification. Not overly expensive tp study either.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,204 ✭✭✭ partyguinness


    Teaching.

    Although I am in England I do know a few 50+ who changed career and went into teaching. One lady after a few years packed that in too and now tutors. She is happy out with it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,368 ✭✭✭ JimmyVik


    Conqueror wrote: »
    You can apply to the Civil Service at age 50, or even 55, 60 or 65 years of age, no problem. I know quite a few people who came into the Civil Service in their forties and fifties who loved it, and a couple of regretted it.

    www.publicjobs.ie lists all open competitions, is updated daily and tells you how to apply. You need an account on the site to apply for most competitions. In general competitions, successful applicants are assigned to a Department that needs a person at that grade. Your brother could get something completely new and random, but he could just as easily be assigned to an IT section.

    The Civil Service is wide-ranging and, for most people, a challenging and rewarding career. But it can be a stifling environment for people who don't like or are not used working within political constraints or the slow changes that come with an organisation that has some 40,000 people working across multiple departments and hundreds of locations across the country, some of whom were in the same role or Department in the 1970s. In addition, for anyone joining after 2013, the pay, pension and T&Cs aren't the goldmines "built at the expense the hard working private sector" nonsense peddled by the Irish Independent. Yes, there are annual increments, but the potential for a huge pay cut at the outset needs to be considered.

    If your brother is interested in working in the Civil Service, might I suggest he looks at the competencies for roles he might apply for. These can be found here.

    He wouldnt mind a pay cut. He is comfortable enough and has put money away for his pension already. He just wants a change.

    It would be hilarious if he ended up back in IT :)

    I just had a browse of that website and the jobs all seem kind of specific on it. I think his problem is he wants out of IT but he doesnt know anything else at this stage.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,506 ✭✭✭ Claw Hammer


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    He wouldnt mind a pay cut. He is comfortable enough and has put money away for his pension already. He just wants a change.

    It would be hilarious if he ended up back in IT :)

    I just had a browse of that website and the jobs all seem kind of specific on it. I think his problem is he wants out of IT but he doesnt know anything else at this stage.

    I know a guy who has a diploma in computer programming and a degree in information systems as well as years of experience of computer operations and systems analysis. He went into the civil service and was put taking dole claims.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,368 ✭✭✭ JimmyVik


    I know a guy who has a diploma in computer programming and a degree in information systems as well as years of experience of computer operations and systems analysis. He went into the civil service and was put taking dole claims.


    He probably wouldnt mind that at all. I think he just wants a change now.
    Im in IT myself and its definitely not like it used to be.
    And his job is even more stressful than mine. He has been contracting for a while and has put away plenty of money. He just wants to work in something that is not as high stress now. I think its a mid life crisis :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,506 ✭✭✭ Claw Hammer


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    He probably wouldnt mind that at all. I think he just wants a change now.
    Im in IT myself and its definitely not like it used to be.
    And his job is even more stressful than mine. He has been contracting for a while and has put away plenty of money. He just wants to work in something that is not as high stress now. I think its a mid life crisis :)

    The civil service can be very stressful for someone with initiative.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,804 ✭✭✭ Tombo2001


    The civil service can be very stressful for someone with initiative.

    I've worked 15 years in private sector and 10 years in civil service and would say you are way out in that remark.

    There is a key difference between the two- which is that if you want major financial reward, then civil service is not the place for you.

    But it can be rewarding in lots of other ways; whereas private sector is obviously much more bottom line focussed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,804 ✭✭✭ Tombo2001


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    He probably wouldnt mind that at all. I think he just wants a change now.
    Im in IT myself and its definitely not like it used to be.
    And his job is even more stressful than mine. He has been contracting for a while and has put away plenty of money. He just wants to work in something that is not as high stress now. I think its a mid life crisis :)

    He wants a less stressful job. Its not a mid life crisis. Its not something you or he should be apologising for


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,804 ✭✭✭ Tombo2001


    What do you mean 'Its definitely not like it used to be'


    (and.....has IT changed or have you changed).


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 172 ✭✭ Case Massive Duckling


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    I was having a few pints with my brother last night and we got to talking.
    He is 50 this year and works in IT. He said he is just tired of it and burnt out. I work at the same game and feel the same, so i know how he feels, but i'll stick at it another few years myself.

    But he said he just wants a totally different career. Nothing to do with IT.
    And he was looking for ideas of how to go about this, without going back to uni :). He reminded me he is 50 . Well I had none.

    Well I had one. Apply to the civil service and see if you can get a job there. I think they just place you in random jobs. Roll the dice and see what happens. But I dont even know if you can start in the civil service at 50 years of age tbh or how you would go about it.

    I think it was an interesting topic.

    So throwing it out to the good boardsies. What should he do? What can he do? Has anyone here ever changed career at 50?

    I have met some fascinating taxi-drivers over the years, who came late into the game. You’re self-employed (though there are obviously huge disadvantages) and meet people every day.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,804 ✭✭✭ Tombo2001


    The other issue here - IT is an incredibly broad field, and Civil Service can mean about 5000 different types of job. The ambassador to China is a civil servant. The guy in the dole office is a civil servant.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,804 ✭✭✭ Tombo2001


    What is rewarding about listening to drivel?

    Why did you change the word 'idiots' to 'drivel'.......? Does it change things somehow?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,204 ✭✭✭ partyguinness


    A buddy of mine studied accountancy at university, qualified as an accountant and fell into a mundane financial role with a large supermarket chain. Mid 30s said "Eff this"- became a tiler and is as happy as the proverbial pig.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,204 ✭✭✭ partyguinness


    I have met some fascinating taxi-drivers over the years, who came late into the game. You’re self-employed (though there are obviously huge disadvantages) and meet people every day.

    That's the mistake taxi drivers right there...thinking that everyone who sits into their car wants to listien to their ****e.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,368 ✭✭✭ JimmyVik


    Tombo2001 wrote: »
    What do you mean 'Its definitely not like it used to be'

    (and.....has IT changed or have you changed).


    Bit of both actually. Im doing it a few years less than my brother, but its gone from cutting edge creative stuff to a grind.


    Also when I was a young man I found it exciting and fun with lots to do and clearly defined jobs to do. No I feel it just grinds on and on. Creativity etc sucked out of it and replaced by red tape and KPIs which just stifle anything creative. Ive worked in a good few different companies now and even the ones that used to be good have gone the same way according to old colleagues still in those companies.


    I went into management for a while and I couldnt hack the bullsh1t and ass covering. Then i went back contracting. The company im in now is not bad tbf, but there can be long and unsociable hours that gets you down.


    IT is a young mans games unless you go into management, and thats just a horrible false environment to be in.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 172 ✭✭ Case Massive Duckling


    That's the mistake taxi drivers right there...thinking that everyone who sits into their car wants to listien to their ****e.

    I have had some really fascinating discussions with taxi-drivers over the years.

    It is great getting the low-down on the well-known individuals that they have driven!


  • Registered Users Posts: 292 ✭✭ Bicyclette


    I joined the Civil Service in my mid-50s. I needed somewhere that was family friendly so I had time and was less stressed to deal with my adult autistic son.

    There is a huge range of work in the Civil Service and lots of opportunities. And once you pass your probation and behave yourself, you are pretty much guaranteed your increment each year. Yes, the pay is poor compared to private industry and the surroundings can be dated but you will encounter some incredibly interesting people. And yes, it can be stressful at times. But all labour laws are adhered to. No demanding people work crazy hours but only put 40 on the clock. People are treated fairly. And there are assistance programmes too to help people who may be struggling with mental health issues or other things.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,804 ✭✭✭ Tombo2001


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    Bit of both actually. Im doing it a few years less than my brother, but its gone from cutting edge creative stuff to a grind.


    Also when I was a young man I found it exciting and fun with lots to do and clearly defined jobs to do. No I feel it just grinds on and on. Creativity etc sucked out of it and replaced by red tape and KPIs which just stifle anything creative. Ive worked in a good few different companies now and even the ones that used to be good have gone the same way according to old colleagues still in those companies.


    I went into management for a while and I couldnt hack the bullsh1t and ass covering. Then i went back contracting. The company im in now is not bad tbf, but there can be long and unsociable hours that gets you down.


    IT is a young mans games unless you go into management, and thats just a horrible false environment to be in.

    A lot of jobs fit this description in my view - they suck the life out of people in their 20s and 30s, those who have an appetite and ambition for management can progress, the rest hit a wall when the long hours and stress dont suit them any more.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,113 ✭✭✭ weisses


    Go nursing


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,368 ✭✭✭ JimmyVik


    weisses wrote: »
    Go nursing


    I couldnt think of anything more stressful :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 172 ✭✭ Case Massive Duckling


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    I couldnt think of anything more stressful :)

    Nurses should be lauded for the work they do! It is not a job to enter without a vocation!


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,059 ✭✭✭ Mooooo


    What are his other interests? If he's willing/ able to take a big cut in pay retraining or moving into an area he has an interest in may help.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,495 ✭✭✭ DublinWriter


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    Also when I was a young man I found it exciting and fun with lots to do and clearly defined jobs to do. No I feel it just grinds on and on. Creativity etc sucked out of it and replaced by red tape and KPIs which just stifle anything creative.

    Completely agree. In IT 30 years myself. It's nothing like is was in terms of being a challenging and interesting career. Technical careers are very siloed and specialised now. I certainly wouldn't have gone into IT if I was starting again today.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,698 ✭✭✭ enricoh


    Where did you get the pints- thats what I wanna know!
    I know a lad who packed in with a multinational and is now a tree surgeon.
    Hard to do with mortgage, kids heading to college etc etc though


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,113 ✭✭✭ weisses


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    I couldnt think of anything more stressful :)

    It can be... It's also very rewarding on many different levels.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,368 ✭✭✭ JimmyVik


    enricoh wrote: »
    Where did you get the pints- thats what I wanna know!
    I know a lad who packed in with a multinational and is now a tree surgeon.
    Hard to do with mortgage, kids heading to college etc etc though


    Out of our Dads bar in his man cave (Yes he built a bar in it). He doesnt know :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,204 ✭✭✭ partyguinness


    In my legal profession role I couldnt give a ****e about it. I would gladly drop it and take up a trade where I have none of the regulatory BS and constant pressures.

    But I can't walk away from the six figure salary...


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,987 ✭✭✭ haphaphap


    speaking as someone who is nearly at the same point in my career I'm getting very tired of the Grand Ol' Duke of York marching me up to the top of the hill and marching me down again with ever increasing frequency as there is no constancy in IT with regard to processes/platforms or technology.
    Some of this is due to Managers adopting a scorched earth policy where they can't take credit for building upon the work of those who went before.


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