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Storage of ammunition / explosives

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 548 ✭✭✭ slipperyox


    1.2 million .22LR cartridges is cool then?
    :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,223 ✭✭✭ Chiparus


    Firearms dealers ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304


    slipperyox wrote: »
    1.2 million .22LR cartridges is cool then?
    :D

    If you have a strong room built to dealer specifications then yes. At home no.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    juice1304 wrote: »
    If you have a strong room built to dealer specifications then yes. At home no.

    "Mode B: A substantial receptacle or safe inside a dwelling house or public room. The general limit is 50 lbs of mixed explosives or double this if kept in a fireproof safe, and in addition, 500 lbs of small arms ammunition (or 550 lbs if small arms ammunition only)".


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Is there a move on to allow blackpowder to be used by shooters interested in muzzleloading ? Its something i always fancied getting involved in. A nice cap and ball revolver would be nice.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 481 ✭✭ Munsterlad102


    tudderone wrote: »
    Is there a move on to allow blackpowder to be used by shooters interested in muzzleloading ? Its something i always fancied getting involved in. A nice cap and ball revolver would be nice.

    Would a cap and ball revolver not be a restricted short firearm and hence unlicensable?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304


    tudderone wrote: »
    Is there a move on to allow blackpowder to be used by shooters interested in muzzleloading ? Its something i always fancied getting involved in. A nice cap and ball revolver would be nice.

    No, You have to have a magazine built and certified by the local authority. It cant be in or near a dwelling. And everything has to be fireproof.
    Nitrocellulose powder is much more stable and safe and they wont allow people have it. So not a hope in hell them allowing people own black powder.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,601 ✭✭✭✭ Witcher


    Would a cap and ball revolver not be a restricted short firearm and hence unlicensable?

    Yes


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    juice1304 wrote: »
    No, You have to have a magazine built and certified by the local authority. It cant be in or near a dwelling. And everything has to be fireproof.
    Nitrocellulose powder is much more stable and safe and they wont allow people have it. So not a hope in hell them allowing people own black powder.

    Petrol is extremely dangerous, it doesn't stop people having it or have to have any special storage conditions. I know lads in the UK into blackpowder shooting, they only need a lockable wooden box to store black powder, we need a replica of a ww2 German flaktower :rolleyes:. Blackpowder shooting must be the most inoffensive of all the shooting sports, it appeals mainly to superannuated old farts...............like me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304


    tudderone wrote: »
    Petrol is extremely dangerous, it doesn't stop people having it or have to have any special storage conditions. I know lads in the UK into blackpowder shooting, they only need a lockable wooden box to store black powder, we need a replica of a ww2 German flaktower :rolleyes:. Blackpowder shooting must be the most inoffensive of all the shooting sports, it appeals mainly to superannuated old farts...............like me.

    Yes everywhere else in the world they want it in a locked wooden box because of static electricity. Here they want it locked in a pressure vessel capable of igniting it with a static charge. Ping pong balls are also made of nitrocellulose. They are just very ignorant and listen to people in the gardai who have gotten their firearms education from watching john wick.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    They are a restricted short firearm, and yet they are perfectly legal to own and possess without a licence, so long as they are originals and not repro's. More Irish logic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    juice1304 wrote: »
    Yes everywhere else in the world they want it in a locked wooden box because of static electricity. Here they want it locked in a pressure vessel capable of igniting it with a static charge. Ping pong balls are also made of nitrocellulose. They are just very ignorant and listen to people in the gardai who have gotten their firearms education from watching john wick.

    Or as admitted by a garda expert in open court, "Youtube" !


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304


    Was that their expert who did an online ballistics course? :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 481 ✭✭ Munsterlad102


    tudderone wrote: »
    They are a restricted short firearm, and yet they are perfectly legal to own and possess without a licence, so long as they are originals and not repro's. More Irish logic.

    Oh yes but they have to be pre 1850 or something similar and must be preunitary cartridge too. But then shooting one would be impossible, with the black powder predicament and the handgun ban.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,330 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45


    juice1304 wrote: »
    Was that their expert who did an online ballistics course? :D

    Ah !Come on!! Give him SOME credit!! He went away and did a long WEEKEND course ....Or two...At a university in Scotland!:D:D:D

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,330 ✭✭✭✭ Grizzly 45


    tudderone wrote: »
    Or as admitted by a garda expert in open court, "Youtube" !

    Known even to his own dept in the Park as "inspector Google":cool:
    In fairness to the guy, if it was crime scenes, and blood patterns,and all that good " CSI Dublin" stuff. He was top of his game, as is the dept.So they deserve a lot of kudos there. Firearms and types , he was totally , excuse the pun, outgunned.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,005 ✭✭✭ Zxthinger


    I'm still at a loss to see why mode b (a wooden lock box) is not accepted. There is a unfair onus being place one any private individuals who wish to examine the possibility of reloading and that is a system that places industrial metrics on a private citizen..
    I have personally given up on the idea that reloading will even be considered for hunters..


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304


    Zxthinger wrote: »
    I'm still at a loss to see why mode b (a wooden lock box) is not accepted. There is a unfair onus being place one any private individuals who wish to examine the possibility of reloading and that is a system that places industrial metrics on a private citizen..
    I have personally given up on the idea that reloading will even be considered for hunters..

    It wont, The wonderful shooting overlords who speak for us all said no hunters etc need or want it. And they are never going to change the legislation its a mess


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Zxthinger wrote: »
    I'm still at a loss to see why mode b (a wooden lock box) is not accepted. There is a unfair onus being place one any private individuals who wish to examine the possibility of reloading and that is a system that places industrial metrics on a private citizen..
    I have personally given up on the idea that reloading will even be considered for hunters..

    What annoys me is things that are commonplace in the shooting sports worldwide are a major no-no's here. Reloading for hunters, pistols for humane dispatch (which are even allowed in the uk), Muzzleloading/blackpowder shooting. "Shure jaysis no, you couldn't have tings like dat here, the sky would fall on us".


  • Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators Posts: 23,482 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Clareman


    I get the impression that here in Ireland we see anything to do with firearms as being capable of being used as terrorist weapons so they will go to the furthest realms of common sense and making their ruling on that, for example, black powder is banned cause it could be used to blow something up, yes that is right and that's what it's designed to do but there are far more suitable alternatives more readily available so the chances of a modernday Guy Fawkes coming in is slim but because it is impossible to apply common sense they just ban it.

    This isn't just in firearms, look at what happened when a discussion on drink driving started to happen, everyone was going to be drinking driving and killing everyone, no that's not what the discussion was but because that's the extreme that's what people jump on so nothing changes.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Clareman wrote: »
    I get the impression that here in Ireland we see anything to do with firearms as being capable of being used as terrorist weapons so they will go to the furthest realms of common sense and making their ruling on that, for example, black powder is banned cause it could be used to blow something up, yes that is right and that's what it's designed to do but there are far more suitable alternatives more readily available so the chances of a modernday Guy Fawkes coming in is slim but because it is impossible to apply common sense they just ban it.

    This isn't just in firearms, look at what happened when a discussion on drink driving started to happen, everyone was going to be drinking driving and killing everyone, no that's not what the discussion was but because that's the extreme that's what people jump on so nothing changes.



    I often had 8 slabs (2,000) or more of shotgun cartridges here when i was shooting a lot of clays. Nothing to stop me sitting down with a stanley knife and cutting every cartridge in half to get the powder out if i was looking to commit an atrocity.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,177 ✭✭✭✭ BattleCorp


    tudderone wrote: »
    I often had 8 slabs (2,000) or more of shotgun cartridges here when i was shooting a lot of clays. Nothing to stop me sitting down with a stanley knife and cutting every cartridge in half to get the powder out if i was looking to commit an atrocity.

    Easier than that. Rent a truck and go for a drive some year that there's a St. Patrick's Day parade. You might have to wait a few years for that though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 49 ESetter


    tudderone wrote: »
    What annoys me is things that are commonplace in the shooting sports worldwide are a major no-no's here. Reloading for hunters, pistols for humane dispatch (which are even allowed in the uk), Muzzleloading/blackpowder shooting. "Shure jaysis no, you couldn't have tings like dat here, the sky would fall on us".

    Is there any moves at all to get reloading here for "joe soap" or is it dead in the water? Its something i would love to get into.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    ESetter wrote: »
    Is there any moves at all to get reloading here for "joe soap" or is it dead in the water? Its something i would love to get into.

    A "Pilot" programme is allowed at the midlands rifle range. I believe it was set up to see how things went, so after that it was kicked down the road in typical irish style.


  • Registered Users Posts: 49 ESetter


    tudderone wrote: »
    A "Pilot" programme is allowed at the midlands rifle range. I believe it was set up to see how things went, so after that it was kicked down the road in typical irish style.

    its a pity that the gardai cannot see that its allowed in most civilised countries and there are no difficulties. I wonder if the deer stalking groups have ever put their case across? ..by the way i have no agenda..just thinking out loud!


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,177 ✭✭✭✭ BattleCorp


    ESetter wrote: »
    its a pity that the gardai cannot see that its allowed in most civilised countries and there are no difficulties. I wonder if the deer stalking groups have ever put their case across? ..by the way i have no agenda..just thinking out loud!

    Hand loaded ammo is even more important when it comes to target shooting as it's much more consistent than factory ammo and can actually be tuned (if that's the correct word) to suit a particular gun making it far more accurate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 49 ESetter


    you would think if you are "suitable" to hold a firearm cert, then you would surely be "suitable" to load ammo for your own needs. it probably would not be a cost saving exercise but would be great for building a load for your own rifle. I would love to be able to load 243 85 grain sierra bthp because they cannot be got in any factory load.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 27,534 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Cass


    tudderone wrote: »
    A "Pilot" programme is allowed at the midlands rifle range. I believe it was set up to see how things went, so after that it was kicked down the road in typical irish style.
    I think, after 11 years, we can safely stop calling it a pilot scheme. ;) However it was kicked the road, again, and again, and again ..........................
    BattleCorp wrote: »
    Hand loaded ammo is even more important when it comes to target shooting as it's much more consistent than factory ammo and can actually be tuned (if that's the correct word) to suit a particular gun making it far more accurate.
    True, but it has its drawbacks too.
    ESetter wrote: »
    I wonder if the deer stalking groups have ever put their case across?
    On that note, how many groups, associations or even individuals, i wonder, have applied for a reloading "license" since the pilot scheme was introduced 11 years ago? When was the last application submitted? In other words has anyone else made inroads, on a group/organizational level, to try and show there is an interest enough to warrant this subject being seriously considered?

    I don't want to come off as a dick, possibly too late, but if everyone is sitting back and simply waiting for the DoJ to ring them and ask if they want it or for the success of the MNSCI program to filter through to other groups naturally, they'll may be waiting a while unless they put their case forward for needing it.

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    If you see a problem post use the report post function, "FLAG" & let a Moderator deal with it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 180 ✭✭ GolfVI


    Cass wrote: »

    On that note, how many groups, associations or even individuals, i wonder, have applied for a reloading "license" since the pilot scheme was introduced 11 years ago? When was the last application submitted? In other words has anyone else made inroads, on a group/organizational level, to try and show there is an interest enough to warrant this subject being seriously considered?

    I don't want to come off as a dick, possibly too late, but if everyone is sitting back and simply waiting for the DoJ to ring them and ask if they want it or for the success of the MNSCI program to filter through to other groups naturally, they'll may be waiting a while unless they put their case forward for needing it.

    To be fair, I've been a member of the midlands for 3-4 years now and attended nearly every weekend when it was open and not a single time has anyone or any staff mentioned or talked about the ability to reload there.

    Is it still possible? How does it work ? Who do I ask?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,177 ✭✭✭✭ BattleCorp


    Cass wrote: »
    True, but it has its drawbacks too.

    What drawbacks would there be? The initial cost of the equipment needed to reload? Or do you mean if someone makes a balls of the reloading process and actually destroys their gun/themselves?


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