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Working From Home Megathread

  • #2
    Registered Users Posts: 1,542 ✭✭✭ WhiteMemento9


    I thought this might get some interesting discussion from the Corona thread. Companies are sending out guidance to staff that they will be required to work from home in the coming month, some in companies where this was never an option before.
    faceman wrote: »
    Tangential comment. The push to have companies work from home is going to create a new working landscape when this all blows over as many companies realize it’s perfectly viable to have a remote workforce.

    Or flipping that over, many companies will find it hard to justify not permitting remote working in their organization in the future

    Many people in my company have the option and don't take advantage of it at all. Working from home suits some people but others enjoy the social outlet of work and the structure it brings. Working from home regularly requires a certain type of person along with a large amount of self-discipline.

    I certainly enjoy many aspects of it and I am not someone who needs the social outlet of work but on the flip side, I often find that I let the workday bleed on for too long at home due to some added anxiety that I have wasted time during the day that I need to add back when in reality I waste far more time in the office that never costs me a thought in the same regard.

    I also wonder about the implications for society as a whole if we were to move further in this direction. It is more towards the direction of segregation and isolation of people with little thought towards how that effects us as social creatures.

    What are other people's thoughts or experiences with working from home?

    How has your company helped out? 45 votes

    Nothing
    53% 24 votes
    Computer equipment provided
    22% 10 votes
    Office equipment provided
    15% 7 votes
    Voucher for either of above
    6% 3 votes
    Other
    2% 1 vote


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Comments

  • #2


    I work from home, paid by the hour. The work is mindnumbingy dull and I have zero self discipline, so bad for the pocket. But I really like the freedom to choose my own hours and travel. At it four years now, and in not sure I will be able to give it up.
    Do I miss meeting people in person? Occasionally, a little, until I meet people in person and remember.
    Haven't left my house in over a week. Not bothered by it.


  • #2


    I've never done it before but will inevitably experience it soon. I would love to try it. I think ideally I'd like to have a flexi option. Half the week at home, half in the office.


  • #2


    Ficheall wrote: »
    I work from home, paid by the hour. The work is mindnumbingy dull and I have zero self discipline, so bad for the pocket. But I really like the freedom to choose my own hours and travel. At it four years now, and in not sure I will be able to give it up.
    Do I miss meeting people in person? Occasionally, a little, until I meet people in person and remember.
    Haven't left my house in over a week. Not bothered by it.


    Do you mind me asking what area it’s in or what you do no problem if you would rather not say. I am looking for work from home options with flexibility as I am pregnant so just interested in the field and any info you might have.


  • #2


    rosiem wrote: »
    Do you mind me asking what area it’s in or what you do no problem if you would rather not say. I am looking for work from home options with flexibility as I am pregnant so just interested in the field and any info you might have.

    Same..


  • #2


    What are other people's thoughts or experiences with working from home?
    I'm in the category of not being able to work from home currently, however I have an interview for a job where the time is divided between working in the community and working from home. If I were to get the job, I'm really looking forward to the flexibility of that. It's nice to think that there would be elements of meeting people and working by myself because when there are people around I find myself wanting to engage with them! I'm much more productive from an admin point of view when there isn't any distraction - I'd say most people are like that.

    This is by comparison with my current job; I'm in an educational setting and one to one all day but also do several hours of work to prepare at home each evening. When I try to stay back after students leave and complete my work, there are usually many interjections by colleagues, cleaning staff, maintenance or other people. I find it quite funny that we expect children to learn in this jarring environment (usually many interruptions per lesson) when even as adults, concentration is impeded.

    I find it quite unfortunate that we're not using this opportunity to trial virtual classrooms in this country. The risk of contracting Covid-19 from a child and passing it onto vulnerable people is ever rising with the continuation of this pandemic. I'm thoroughly not content to just wait for it to affect me and those I love, at the mercy of a government who is still sore from an embarrassing election result.

    I understand that there are procedures to be followed but in the best interest of the children, their grandparents and the country, we really need to be exploring ways of enabling education to be done remotely as soon as possible.


  • #2


    As more large companies move here there is specific industry's/type of job can't be done from (ABW) activity based working.

    Small coffee/deli shops, restaurants, anything in manufacturing, bars, hair dressers, working from home can't be done here.

    It doesn't impact me I work in a large global insurance company with 1500+ staff around the world from Asia to the US all offices still open. But employees for the last 15/16 months all have the option to work from whereeve they like.

    This potential outbreak will impact local areas if everybody stopped commuting to the regular office. But large companys with the IT tech in place might see little drop in employee output.


  • #2


    rosiem wrote: »
    Do you mind me asking what area it’s in or what you do no problem if you would rather not say. I am looking for work from home options with flexibility as I am pregnant so just interested in the field and any info you might have.
    zweton wrote: »
    Same..
    You'd need a phd in maths, and we have no vacancies at present. No more PMs, please.


    But congrats on your respective pregnancies..


    Edit: The multiple thanks on rosiem's post would suggest I'm being perceived as a bit of a d*ck here, which is absolutely fair from context, but I'd like to add that I'd also already received a couple of PMs asking about jobs, so this post was also partially in reaction to those. Apologies to rosiem though for quoting her but then not giving her post a deserved response.


  • #2


    I find it quite unfortunate that we're not using this opportunity to trial virtual classrooms in this country. The risk of contracting Covid-19 from a child and passing it onto vulnerable people is ever rising with the continuation of this pandemic. I'm thoroughly not content to just wait for it to affect me and those I love, at the mercy of a government who is still sore from an embarrassing election result.

    I understand that there are procedures to be followed but in the best interest of the children, their grandparents and the country, we really need to be exploring ways of enabling education to be done remotely as soon as possible.

    I can understand the benefits in this particular situation but my initial gut reaction to reading the idea of virtual classrooms for kids is that it wouldn't be the greatest idea. Those formative years for children in schools are where kids learn so much about how to develop themselves as young adults, social interactions with adults and peers, introductions to people from diverse backgrounds and cultures, structure and a whole host of other things beyond the direct educational itself. Now I can see plenty of benefits towards the direct education itself but I think those would come at too high a cost.


  • #2


    Ficheall wrote: »
    You'd need a phd in maths, and we have no vacancies at present. No more PMs, please.


    But congrats on your respective pregnancies..

    Sorry was just interested in what the job area was my background is science and data analysis. I wasn’t looking for a job either so no need to reply like I asked you for one a polite question was all I asked.


  • #2


    rosiem wrote: »
    Sorry was just interested in what the job area was my background is science and data analysis. I wasn’t looking for a job either so no need to reply like I asked you for one a polite question was all I asked.

    There are surely plenty of options in the market for this type of field in a work from home capacity. The issue I see mostly is that companies like to check someone out a little before extending them this kind of trust. So it is often the situation that you need to be working in a company for a period of time before they offer the option or you get to float the idea unless of course, you can demonstrate a past track record in a similar capacity at previous roles.


  • #2


    Whatever about working from home, this could also further the cause of the 4 day work week. That coupled with a day a week working from home would reduce commuting times significantly for many people and reduce congestion.


  • #2


    I really think it depends on the person and what stage of life you are in.

    When I started working way back when :D there was Thursday /Friday night drinks, a great social scene and great to mix with colleagues outside of the office (I know some people hate this)

    There's also the risk that you maybe overlooked for promotion out of sight out of mind etc. It's very hard to network from your home office :)

    When I was living at home in my parents house there's absolutely no way I'd be able to work from home, my mother would have me plagued.

    I'm currently on maternity leave and working from home has been rolled out in my office. No one has a desk anymore. Reports are there's pros and cons. Great from an early start no commute, don't have to get showered/dressed etc, fly through work with little disturbance. Can get a couple of chores done too.

    The downsides are more on the social aspects, the team is broken up, no one really knows what anyone else is doing so a support network has been removed. Most of my team are there 15+ years so we know what we're up to, I'm not sure if I'd like to be a newbie.

    Some log back on after dinner/kids gone to bed and do more work which I think can lead to a dangerous cycle if not kept in check.

    I think if you worked full-time from home you would definitely need a social outlet somewhere and be mindful that you're not isolating yourself.


  • #2


    There are surely plenty of options in the market for this type of field in a work from home capacity. The issue I see mostly is that companies like to check someone out a little before extending them this kind of trust. So it is often the situation that you need to be working in a company for a period of time before they offer the option or you get to float the idea unless of course, you can demonstrate a past track record in a similar capacity at previous roles.


    Yea you are correct plenty of of work from home options it was more the aspect of choosing your own hours I am interested in to be honest. I currently WFH 2 days a week but I must work core hours of 10 to 4 I would love the flexibility to do some of my hours in evening. In saying that I do love going into the office as well as working from home it’s a nice balance just being greedy I suppose looking for extra time flexibility as well 😀


  • #2


    rosiem wrote: »
    Sorry was just interested in what the job area was my background is science and data analysis. I wasn’t looking for a job either so no need to reply like I asked you for one a polite question was all I asked.
    Apologies, my response was intended in a light-hearted fashion, but I can see how it could easily be misconstrued. I proofread maths papers. I'm trying to get into data analysis - the money is way better, and there are far more opportunities for remote working - try weworkremotely.com for various remote working jobs.


  • #2


    Ficheall wrote: »
    Apologies, my response was intended in a light-hearted fashion, but I can see how it could easily be misconstrued. I proofread maths papers. I'm trying to get into data analysis - the money is way better, and there are far more opportunities for remote working - try weworkremotely.com for various remote working jobs.


    Thanks Ficheall appreciate the reply and I am prob a little extra sensitive at the moment and suffering insomnia but I do agree it is a great field with lots of opportunities thanks for link will take a look.


  • #2


    I thought this might get some interesting discussion from the Corona thread. Companies are sending out guidance to staff that they will be required to work from home in the coming months, some in companies where this was never an option before.

    The underlined bits are quite interesting, and contradictory.
    I know in my job we have people who will refuse to work from home because this was not something that was ever a requirement of their job/contract. And in many cases wfh-ing was refused or at best a struggle.
    Unapologetically, I'm on the side of those who have been called 'the trouble-makers' - but I don't think any company big or small can go from 'tell us 2 weeks in advance why you need to work from home' to 'you must work from home next week'.


  • #2


    I wfh maybe a day every other week, and planning to get to a more permanent agreement about it: think my productivity is increased when wfh in general, and I would want to use one day a week wfh to focus on research/analysis - stay away from some noise.

    but do wonder if boundaries would be crossed more - currently, when I do my overtime from home, I am conscious that I should rather do home stuff instead - if home is to become formally my office, will I totally forget about that ...


  • #2


    I WFH 2 days a week and it's become a prerequisite for any job offer I might consider now.

    Commuting is time consuming and expensive (especially when you're living an hour away from the office) and the flexibility is invaluable.

    It very much depends on the role as most may not be suitable. Mine involves primarily conference calls and emails with people in the UK or locally (but not many face to face meetings), so I don't really need to be in the office anyway. If I was still managing a team it would be different, or if it was a front line customer facing role.

    Also requires discipline. When I'm WFH I'm working from home - not lazing on the couch watching TV with the laptop open. I setup the spare bedroom as a home office with big desk, dual screen monitors, speakerphone etc. It means you're actually in an environment where distractions and temptations are minimal when you need to get stuff done. In fact, I'd say that I get more done most of the time and work longer hours (as I log on at the same time that I'd otherwise still be in the car).

    It's not for everyone as not everyone is comfortable with the isolation either, but I've never minded my own company. Could never go back to a full week in an office to be honest. I used to really enjoy the social aspects in previous jobs but that changes when you're older, more senior roles, and have other priorities and responsibilities outside of work.


  • #2


    My husband works from home full time and it’s been brilliant for our family once early teething issues were removed. His commute meant he was up at 5, leaving at 615. Finishing work at 5 and traffic meant he was getting in anywhere between 615 and after 7 on a bad day. Now he gets up with us, has breakfast with us and starts work at 745 in the office we now have in the garden. Finishes work at 6 and now rarely needs to work too much outside hours as so much less time is wasted on the commute.

    It did take discipline initially to agree on work/home boundaries and times etc. He also would say that the worst scenario is partially working from home because it disrupts the flow of the week. Full time at home there’s no chopping and changing routine. He works with an international company so the morning is coding and when America wakes up it’s mostly meetings. He’s constantly talking to one person or another and they still seem to have all the usual office politics and craic with each other tbh


  • #2


    working hard or hardly working, AMIRITE?


  • #2


    My wife has been working from home for over a decade (multinational - managing a global team so no Irish colleagues) .. and my company have introduced a smart working policy for the last two years - there is an office there but only if you want to come in or have to come in.

    We live somewhat rural and this work enviorment allows us to live where we want and not be crippled by a commute.

    Apart from all the obvious benefits - saving on fuel, commute time etc we get to have a proper family life .. drop the kids to school, pick them up, have homework done early and loads of time to do any extra curricular activities.

    It also mean that we spend more of our money locally .. lunch out once or twice a week, all out shopping is done locally and a coffee every day.

    Personally I believe that companies should get some form of tax break / incentive for facilitating smart working .. the tech is out there and it’s relatively cheap and secure.

    Self discipline is another story .. however people adapt and find their level


  • #2


    No commute, and can free up valuable sq footage for employers.

    I wouldn't like to do it fulltime though. The social aspect of work is important. Two/three days a week would be ideal.

    Can see it been adopted in a lot more companies post coronavirus. A lot are being semi forced into it now, and using it as a live test.


  • #2


    whippet wrote: »
    My wife has been working from home for over a decade (multinational - managing a global team so no Irish colleagues) .. and my company have introduced a smart working policy for the last two years - there is an office there but only if you want to come in or have to come in.

    We live somewhat rural and this work enviorment allows us to live where we want and not be crippled by a commute.

    Apart from all the obvious benefits - saving on fuel, commute time etc we get to have a proper family life .. drop the kids to school, pick them up, have homework done early and loads of time to do any extra curricular activities.

    It also mean that we spend more of our money locally .. lunch out once or twice a week, all out shopping is done locally and a coffee every day.

    Personally I believe that companies should get some form of tax break / incentive for facilitating smart working .. the tech is out there and it’s relatively cheap and secure.

    Self discipline is another story .. however people adapt and find their level
    sounds brilliant, wish i could do it but i manage a large number of people in an operations setting so not possible for me unfortunately.


  • #2


    I work from home too. I wouldn't recommend it early in a career but it's brilliant when you are settled. I work in the office in a hot desk scenario once per week. That keeps the contact going with others.

    Instant messaging is your friend when working at home and you need to initiate calls sometimes as people have a tendency to keep questions "until you are in" but I prefer to get things sorted over the phone rather than keeping them.

    I find the no commute fantastic and it's handy to be here when kids get in from school, take in the washing of it rains etc.

    I use a dedicated workspace, I have a desk and proper office chair. Of course this doubles up as a study desk in the evening for one of my kids but that's ok.

    I work in accounts btw and am in my current work at home job for over 10 years


  • #2


    I would love to do a 4 day week with 2 days WFH, best balance between work-life/autonomy for WFH and maintaining contact with colleagues for developmental, engagement, social reasons

    However my job requires too many high security systems so no option to WFH on a laptop, it can be done but costs too much apparently, and of course all the departments with less complex/risky IT have the ability to work remotely on laptops, so my department's continuity plan is to locate some staff in different buildings, however when the virus spreads everywhere and likely building shut downs are implemented then they are completely screwed


  • #2


    rosiem wrote: »
    Sorry was just interested in what the job area was my background is science and data analysis. I wasn’t looking for a job either so no need to reply like I asked you for one a polite question was all I asked.

    Hi Rosie

    I work in Project Management and have the option to work from home. I never studied it coming from a financial background and kind of fell into it and more opportunities came up which I grasped. Now I am starting to do some professional certificates to compliment my experience.

    I'd imagine someone with a background like yourself has good critical thinking and organisational skills so perhaps it could be something for you to look at. There are even data migration projects out there as companies move to cloud based applications.

    What I love about Project Management is the variation of projects. So far I have worked on Software systems, IT architecture, Office Moves, Data Migration and Governance projects. Thrown into the deepend of each but PM skills are transferable across all.

    A lot of this work can be managed remotely with the right equipment. Also lots of flexibility in hours comes with it once organised.

    Best of luck!


  • #2


    I can understand the benefits in this particular situation but my initial gut reaction to reading the idea of virtual classrooms for kids is that it wouldn't be the greatest idea. Those formative years for children in schools are where kids learn so much about how to develop themselves as young adults, social interactions with adults and peers, introductions to people from diverse backgrounds and cultures, structure and a whole host of other things beyond the direct educational itself. Now I can see plenty of benefits towards the direct education itself but I think those would come at too high a cost.
    I don't mean in general. Just because of the pandemic going on. Several schools have had to close.


  • #2


    My company (a large multi-national with offices around the world) fully embraces working from home and we can do it whenever we want. Most people WFH about 1-2 days a week, but lately most people are working from home 5 days a week and only coming into the office for very urgent things. Every couple of months the company will have everyone work from home to test the network, VPN etc.

    Meetings in the office are 99% of the time Skype enabled as people dial in from home or another office, so there's little change to our work-flows now that most people are working from home, and we already use Teams.

    Seems to suit most people, I've noticed that the younger people hate it - mostly because they either live with other people, or they don't have a decent space at home to setup as an "office".

    Personally - I like working from home 2-3 days a week but every day is a little OTT. For certain meetings, I much prefer doing them in person vs over conference call, and I miss the social side. (plus, paying for coffee and meals is costly :D)

    In 2020, role dependent, I can't see why employers don't have a decent work from home policy. There is no need for general office staff to come into office 5 days a week.


  • #2


    Find it very hard to WFH, to many distractions. No actual fixed office in country, as involved in National sales, but find get more done in the various service stations / fast food outlets.

    Would love if there was a cheap network of pop in office spaces around the country. Good B/B, coffee machine, communal area, sealed office cubicles for quiet work, phone calls etc. Would benefit communities, as would allow people the office environment, but not the commute.


  • #2


    I worked from home a couple of years ago and after a few months I ended up with cabin fever. Totally lost my mind and was miserable.

    I'm not exactly a social person but with no real interaction with others it was just incredibly draining.

    Working from home once or twice a week is grand, but permanently it's just an awful time.


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