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Machinery Photo/Discussion Thread II

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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,177 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    I've used the standard one without the wrap retainer. It was used off the 3pt linkage. What I found was that the knife did not retract sufficiently to allow proper stabbing of the bale for transport. Although in hindsight it might have been better to stab into the base of the bale as per the McHale videos/photos - but then we stack bales vertically and flicking them over in the compound etc was a hassle. Also as there were 3 prongs on it, it made it more difficult to stab the bale as it had a tendency to slide.

    I found them to be no more useful than a front end loader. When we split the bales longitudinally we found that they were no easier to graip as they fell cut side up which didn't give anything to get the graip stuck into. So, we then had to raise and lower the split bale to loosen it up. For us it also took up the entire passageway which meant we were having to walk over the cut bale and so we were stinking of silage.
    We gave up using it and went back to using the loader to bring them in and using the graip initially. We then would use the prongs to lift the bale and let it break apart in the air when the bale tightened after the swiss roll effect wore off. This was not much slower than the knife.

    If you don't have a loader, I'd look at one of those first - much more versatile. If you do have a loader I'd question the need for the splitter unless you are in a big way of going feeding multiple bales daily.

    As the RS4 looks to be a loader attachment, it seems you already have a loader so could you not re-lift your bale in the feeding area offset and it would then disintegrate?

    If you are loading a feeder wagon, then it would be a really good job for that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,207 ✭✭✭Dozer1


    thanks for that,
    I'm in an old school yard so its a safety issue for me,
    I'm putting the cows in a shed then lifting bale on front loader, driving into the front of the barrier with the bale lifted over it,
    hopping out then to cut the plastic & net (having to reach under loader) and dropping the bale
    off shaped bales are inclinded to fall before I'm safely in the tractor
    I'd rather not become a statistic..


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,611 ✭✭✭Mooooo


    Dozer1 wrote: »
    thanks for that,
    I'm in an old school yard so its a safety issue for me,
    I'm putting the cows in a shed then lifting bale on front loader, driving into the front of the barrier with the bale lifted over it,
    hopping out then to cut the plastic & net (having to reach under loader) and dropping the bale
    off shaped bales are inclinded to fall before I'm safely in the tractor
    I'd rather not become a statistic..

    With bales here we cut off the end of bale plastic and tip it out on It's end then, and use the prong to pull off the plastic then as you're pulling it out of the bale, works most of the time anyway. Hop down to roll the net off the bale then. Hate bales.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,177 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    Dozer1 wrote: »
    thanks for that,
    I'm in an old school yard so its a safety issue for me,
    I'm putting the cows in a shed then lifting bale on front loader, driving into the front of the barrier with the bale lifted over it,
    hopping out then to cut the plastic & net (having to reach under loader) and dropping the bale
    off shaped bales are inclinded to fall before I'm safely in the tractor
    I'd rather not become a statistic..

    Yes, that's a good reason to look into them. Have you thought about a bale slicer instead like the Tanco or the Keltec?
    I've read that the Tanco allows you to split the bale between two locations.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,177 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    Back to the livestock trailers - are fail safe brakes a requirement now or when is it coming in?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 24,403 ✭✭✭✭Reggie.


    Back to the livestock trailers - are fail safe brakes a requirement now or when is it coming in?

    Better to have it on the trailer if possible. Theres one on my new one anyways


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,177 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    Reggie. wrote: »
    Better to have it on the trailer if possible. Theres one on my new one anyways

    Are they expensive to retrofit?


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,403 ✭✭✭✭Reggie.


    Are they expensive to retrofit?

    Not sure, most are just like a handbrake on a ratchet with a wire rope out of it. If the trailer comes off then the rope is pulled and the handbrake pulled and help on by the ratchet. Suppose it could be added after wards but handier to get it put on when it's new really.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,072 ✭✭✭emaherx


    Back to the livestock trailers - are fail safe brakes a requirement now or when is it coming in?

    Fairly sure they are required on all new trailers since 2016. Chains sufficient on older trailers, but like Reggie said if you can fit them all the better.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,114 ✭✭✭✭wrangler


    Reggie. wrote: »
    Not sure, most are just like a handbrake on a ratchet with a wire rope out of it. If the trailer comes off then the rope is pulled and the handbrake pulled and help on by the ratchet. Suppose it could be added after wards but handier to get it put on when it's new really.

    Hubs would have to have brakes in them too


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  • Registered Users Posts: 24,403 ✭✭✭✭Reggie.


    wrangler wrote: »
    Hubs would have to have brakes in them too

    That was a given really


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,177 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    Reggie. wrote: »
    Not sure, most are just like a handbrake on a ratchet with a wire rope out of it. If the trailer comes off then the rope is pulled and the handbrake pulled and help on by the ratchet. Suppose it could be added after wards but handier to get it put on when it's new really.

    Ahh - thats just a breakaway cable then. i can sort that out easily enough.

    The ones I were looking at seemed to work off a drop in hydraulic pressure when the hose uncoupled. But it seemed to require electronics.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,072 ✭✭✭emaherx


    Ahh - thats just a breakaway cable then. i can sort that out easily enough.

    The ones I were looking at seemed to work off a drop in hydraulic pressure when the hose uncoupled. But it seemed to require electronics.

    I've seen those too, I think it uses accumulator to apply breaks when 12v supply is cut. But if trailer already has cable operated handbrake the breakaway cable is the obvious choice. Might need to modify lever so cable pulls in right direction.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,177 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    £400 for the electric one: https://www.fwi.co.uk/news/fail-safe-trailer-braking-system-beats-legislation

    This one seems to not require electronics, but I can't view the diagrams in detail to see what is going on:
    http://www.erentek.co.uk/agric.htm (search for '534')

    Breakaway cable certainly more simple and less expensive.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,177 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    Just realised we've got a new Abbey tanker within the last 12 months with cable handbrake and there is no breakaway cable with it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,403 ✭✭✭✭Reggie.


    Just realised we've got a new Abbey tanker within the last 12 months with cable handbrake and there is no breakaway cable with it.

    Not sure but think tankers are different. In fairness if you lock up the brakes on a tanker suddenly shes going for a tumble


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,072 ✭✭✭emaherx



    This one seems to not require electronics, but I can't view the diagrams in detail to see what is going on:
    http://www.erentek.co.uk/agric.htm (search for '534')

    Breakaway cable certainly more simple and less expensive.

    That link seems to be for air brake systems, don't air brakes automatically apply on air pressure failure?

    Second, system down is for retrofitting air brakes to a tractor with only hydraulic trailer brakes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,072 ✭✭✭emaherx


    Reggie. wrote: »
    Not sure but think tankers are different. In fairness if you lock up the brakes on a tanker suddenly shes going for a tumble

    Hard to see a good outcome for a tanker coming off with chain, breakaway braking or just left to find it's own resting place.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,177 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    emaherx wrote: »
    That link seems to be for air brake systems, don't air brakes automatically apply on air pressure failure?

    Second, system down is for retrofitting air brakes to a tractor with only hydraulic trailer brakes.
    To insure against this possibility, we can supply a device which will fit any trailer with hydraulic brakes and which will apply those brakes instantly in the event of an unscheduled disconnection.

    Did you do the search for 534?

    It seems to be some type of accumulator setup similar to the fail-safe, but I don't think it has the electrics.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,177 ✭✭✭funkey_monkey


    Reggie. wrote: »
    Not sure but think tankers are different. In fairness if you lock up the brakes on a tanker suddenly shes going for a tumble

    Major supply them on their tankers.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,072 ✭✭✭emaherx


    Did you do the search for 534?

    It seems to be some type of accumulator setup similar to the fail-safe, but I don't think it has the electrics.

    Ah missed that, can't seem to read the info from my phone.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,424 ✭✭✭Waffletraktor


    emaherx wrote: »
    Ah missed that, can't seem to read the info from my phone.

    New equipment running hydraulic brakes now need to be twin line like air with a suplly and signal line.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,611 ✭✭✭Mooooo


    MfMan wrote: »
    It's the Weidemann T4512. The price I mentioned earlier would be as per ploughing match last year, bound to have risen a bit since again. The Wacker Neuson TH412 is the exact same machine, but maybe slightly cheaper.

    Still a fair chunk of change. Have an 86 jcb 412 here not far off the end of her days , 20k hours on her. See in the journal a lad bought a job 413, the list price they had down was 115k + vat. Replacing with a 15 to 20 year old machine would still be near on 30k and perhaps as likely to have as much or more maintenance costs than my own with it, but when new is that price it's hard to know as new would put a lot of pressure on with repayments esp when money could be needed elsewhere


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,072 ✭✭✭emaherx


    New equipment running hydraulic brakes now need to be twin line like air with a suplly and signal line.

    Any links to that?

    I've heard similar but as far as I'm aware (and open to correction) new tractors will have this requirement from 2020 but no requirement on new trailers as of yet (and I presume only trailers over a certain weight/speed would need such a breaking system)


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,072 ✭✭✭emaherx


    emaherx wrote: »
    Any links to that?

    I've heard similar but as far as I'm aware (and open to correction) new tractors will have this requirement from 2020 but no requirement on new trailers as of yet (and I presume only trailers over a certain weight/speed would need such a breaking system)

    Edit: nevermind found it.
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.tuev-nord.de/fileadmin/Content/TUEV_NORD_DE/verkehr/fachtagung_vortrag7_wabco.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjpg4vD_rflAhUDWhUIHaWCBokQFjANegQIBRAB&usg=AOvVaw1L_jC9c4YWotelvJBsDQ20

    Will eventually be all trailers with a 10 year transitional period. So 2025 since it was written in 2015 or 2029 10 years after tractors?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,753 ✭✭✭9935452


    Reggie. wrote: »
    Not sure but think tankers are different. In fairness if you lock up the brakes on a tanker suddenly shes going for a tumble

    Not sure of braking regulations for tanks but I do remember reading that they aren't treated or classed as trailers for weight purposes.
    If they were single axel 2300 gallon tanks and bigger would be overweight


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,424 ✭✭✭Waffletraktor


    emaherx wrote: »
    Edit: nevermind found it.
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.tuev-nord.de/fileadmin/Content/TUEV_NORD_DE/verkehr/fachtagung_vortrag7_wabco.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjpg4vD_rflAhUDWhUIHaWCBokQFjANegQIBRAB&usg=AOvVaw1L_jC9c4YWotelvJBsDQ20

    Will eventually be all trailers with a 10 year transitional period. So 2025 since it was written in 2015 or 2029 10 years after tractors?

    Couldnt tell you the details, hired a loader in summer with a yellow and red line. Asked dealer about it when picking it up.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,746 ✭✭✭✭patsy_mccabe


    If it ain't red.......

    'When I was a boy we were serfs, slave minded. Anyone who came along and lifted us out of that belittling, I looked on them as Gods.' - Dan Breen



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,414 ✭✭✭hopeso


    emaherx wrote: »
    Not yet, busy trying to get FYM out between showers + had to move cattle between out farms and a few into shed for winter (ironically new trailer would have made that easier).

    Should be quite after Halloween, will have time then to go and look properly.

    I'm leaning towards the Bridgeway possibly the 18x7. I wouldn't mind spending the bit extra if I see a similar trailer sheeted in Aluminum but I think the 16x8 Tuffmac is just that bit too wide for my tractor.

    Just spotted this one.... I don't know if you've tried them already, but it looks sound enough. The one in the link is 20', but I'd assume they make smaller too...

    https://www.donedeal.ie/silagetrailers-for-sale/20ft-cronin-cattle-trailer/22834518


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,072 ✭✭✭emaherx


    hopeso wrote: »
    Just spotted this one.... I don't know if you've tried them already, but it looks sound enough. The one in the link is 20', but I'd assume they make smaller too...

    https://www.donedeal.ie/silagetrailers-for-sale/20ft-cronin-cattle-trailer/22834518

    Paying deposit on Tuffmac on Tuesday. They are going to build an 18x7 for me :D


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