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Hansons Method

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  • Which version of the book have people bought?




  • digiman wrote: »
    Which version of the book have people bought?

    2nd Edition




  • 2nd Edition

    Thanks, bought it for kindle last night and read the first chapter. I'm coming from a base where the most I've ran this year is 52km in a week and I'm just under 700km for the year so the distance is probably way too much for me.

    I ran a sub21 park run a couple of weeks ago and have done 3 marathons in the past with 2 Dublins. One was 3:59:xx and last one was 3:57:xx but I did minimal training for both.

    I think I've a sub 3:30 in me, 85kg and 5ft 9 which is one problem I need to address but if I was to do the mileage on the plan that would quick fall off I'd say. But concerned that the mileage is such a step up that I'd injure myself. Have a week to decide, any thoughts?




  • digiman wrote: »
    I think I've a sub 3:30 in me, 85kg and 5ft 9 which is one problem I need to address but if I was to do the mileage on the plan that would quick fall off I'd say. But concerned that the mileage is such a step up that I'd injure myself. Have a week to decide, any thoughts?

    More than likely if you are training consistently to the plan then then you will gain strength and become a leaner fitter version of yourself :)


    The mileage on the plan is mostly easy miles. If you treat them as easy miles and run them easy then you are mitigation the risk of injury. The work sessions (SOS - Session of Substance) are progressive and build every 3 weeks along with the general fatigue. I didn't have the base of miles coming into the plan that I wanted. I was around 30m or 50km a week

    The main thing I found with the plan is managing the fatigue. By week 3 or 4 you will get into a good rhythm of consistent training and momentum to get you by day to day. You will have a feel for the format of the plan. I found no problem with motivating myself to get out and do the sessions and I like how each week was similar to the last one. I kept the work sessions more or less to planned paces and address fatigue on the easy runs. What actually happened was I slowed Monday runs to a recovery pace.

    Its not an easy plan but its very doable. You have to sign up to doing 6 runs a week and consistently doing so, brick by brick by brick. If you don't do at least that, you are kidding yourself.




  • digiman wrote: »
    Thanks, bought it for kindle last night and read the first chapter. I'm coming from a base where the most I've ran this year is 52km in a week and I'm just under 700km for the year so the distance is probably way too much for me.

    I ran a sub21 park run a couple of weeks ago and have done 3 marathons in the past with 2 Dublins. One was 3:59:xx and last one was 3:57:xx but I did minimal training for both.

    I think I've a sub 3:30 in me, 85kg and 5ft 9 which is one problem I need to address but if I was to do the mileage on the plan that would quick fall off I'd say. But concerned that the mileage is such a step up that I'd injure myself. Have a week to decide, any thoughts?

    I agree with shotgunmcos, it's tough but doable. Once you keep your easy runs easy and stick to the speed paces you'll gradually build up the milage without injury.
    I'm on week 5 of the half plan and running way more than I usually do. I'm tired but not overly so and I'm still hitting the paces. I though people were joking that it's easier to run 6-7 days a week than 3-4 but I'm starting to think it's true! Because you know you can't swap sessions as easily you know you just have to make time to run each day so there's less procrastination.


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  • digiman wrote: »
    Thanks, bought it for kindle last night and read the first chapter. I'm coming from a base where the most I've ran this year is 52km in a week and I'm just under 700km for the year so the distance is probably way too much for me.

    I ran a sub21 park run a couple of weeks ago and have done 3 marathons in the past with 2 Dublins. One was 3:59:xx and last one was 3:57:xx but I did minimal training for both.

    I think I've a sub 3:30 in me, 85kg and 5ft 9 which is one problem I need to address but if I was to do the mileage on the plan that would quick fall off I'd say. But concerned that the mileage is such a step up that I'd injure myself. Have a week to decide, any thoughts?

    Which version of the plan are you thinking of doing? I think it's important to have the recommended base mileage before tackling any version of the plan, certainly the advanced version.




  • Murph_D wrote: »
    Which version of the plan are you thinking of doing? I think it's important to have the recommended base mileage before tackling any version of the plan, certainly the advanced version.

    Just started reading the book last night but by the end of my commute home this evening I hope to be able to answer that question!




  • digiman wrote: »
    Murph_D wrote: »
    Which version of the plan are you thinking of doing? I think it's important to have the recommended base mileage before tackling any version of the plan, certainly the advanced version.

    Just started reading the book last night but by the end of my commute home this evening I hope to be able to answer that question!

    Go for it. Even if you don’t nail every session the fact you are running 6 days you will come on and pb




  • ToriV wrote: »
    Great thread! Very interesting approach and I'm also going to use it for a half marathon attempt. I have the 18 week plan but id love to see the 12 week one that was mentioned above if you get a chance.

    What is the main difference between them - less base building weeks?? Thanks!

    I wasn’t able to find it, sorry. Plenty of alternative options here: https://lukehumphreyrunning.com/training-programs/

    Luke Humphrey used to work for the Hanson brothers and wrote the books.




  • About 40% of the way through the book and going to follow the advanced plan for the first 5 weeks and will move to the beginner plan at that stage if I can't keep up with the advanced one as that's when things really step up. I'm already doing a speed session and a tempo run every week so it shouldn't be too hard to keep up until week 5.


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  • digiman wrote: »
    About 40% of the way through the book and going to follow the advanced plan for the first 5 weeks and will move to the beginner plan at that stage if I can't keep up with the advanced one as that's when things really step up. I'm already doing a speed session and a tempo run every week so it shouldn't be too hard to keep up until week 5.

    Why just week 5? The plan progresses each week for the speed but only every 3 weeks for the tempo. Week 6 steps up a gear on both but there is no LR. Its a 2x SOS week so after the Tempo 7m you have 4 easy days before the next session :)

    Week 7 is actually a noticeable step as the pyramid is tough and its the first week you cross 50m for the week. The fatigue really starts to build from week 7. However if you are making sure your easy runs are really easy you will stay on the right side of fatigue vs overreaching and you might be surprised how you legs bounce back ready for more each day.




  • 18 Weeks to DCM!

    If using the Hansons Plan most of you will start today with a rest day :D. Good Luck!




  • 18 Weeks to DCM!

    If using the Hansons Plan most of you will start today with a rest day :D. Good Luck!


    Yeah 3 rest days in a row for a start of plan seems, i don't know, weird....think i am going to have to get out and do some easy miles.




  • Yeah 3 rest days in a row for a start of plan seems, i don't know, weird....think i am going to have to get out and do some easy miles.

    Might be a needed break after a few consistent weeks of dedicated easy base miles... ahem ;)




  • Might be a needed break after a few consistent weeks of dedicated easy base miles... ahem ;)


    True Enough - maybe I should take heed!




  • What is the difference between Easy and Long Runs on this plan?
    Long Run = MP + 30s
    Is Easy just "slower" than that?




  • mathie wrote: »
    What is the difference between Easy and Long Runs on this plan?
    Long Run = MP + 30s
    Is Easy just "slower" than that?

    Yes, a minute to a minute and half slower I think.




  • Here we go. I compiled a list of excuses into an excel sheet. I'm ready to blame everything and anything for not sticking to the plan.




  • Kissy Lips wrote: »
    Here we go. I compiled a list of excuses into an excel sheet. I'm ready to blame everything and anything for not sticking to the plan.

    Just 6 easy miles to get started today.. YOU.CAN.DO.IT!




  • Felt very sluggish after 3 days off !! Maybe it was the heat....


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  • So said I'd give this plan a try, starting tonight with the easy 6 miler, I normally train 4 days a week so I'm hesitant about 6 days but I'll give it a go. I haven't finished the book yet but I was just wondering does the long run also have a 1 mile warmup and cool down




  • fennor72 wrote: »
    So said I'd give this plan a try, starting tonight with the easy 6 miler, I normally train 4 days a week so I'm hesitant about 6 days but I'll give it a go. I haven't finished the book yet but I was just wondering does the long run also have a 1 mile warmup and cool down

    No it doesn't. No harm in doing a very easy hour to warm up I suppose but that technically makes your LR longer. Plus the LR is firstly about time on your feet. I generally struggle to hit the prescribed pace straight away but warm up over the first mile of the LR.

    If you are going from 4 days a week to 6, thats already a challenge. No real need to add more miles :)

    The SOS (sessions of substance) on Tuesdays and Thursdays have 2m warm up and cool down




  • If you are going from 4 days a week to 6, thats already a challenge. No real need to add more miles


    Yes that's the one thing about the plan that I'd be worried about, but the book does say that if the easy day's are designed and paced properly the extra strain on the body will hopefully be minimal. That they are placed before and after SOS days to aid recovery




  • fennor72 wrote: »
    Yes that's the one thing about the plan that I'd be worried about, but the book does say that if the easy day's are designed and paced properly the extra strain on the body will hopefully be minimal. That they are placed before and after SOS days to aid recovery

    How much mileage were you putting in over the four days? I think that's a more important number than the frequency. And which version of Hanson are you considering?




  • No it doesn't. No harm in doing a very easy hour to warm up I suppose but that technically makes your LR longer. Plus the LR is firstly about time on your feet. I generally struggle to hit the prescribed pace straight away but warm up over the first mile of the LR.

    If you are going from 4 days a week to 6, thats already a challenge. No real need to add more miles :)

    The SOS (sessions of substance) on Tuesdays and Thursdays have 2m warm up and cool down

    Isn't the LR also considered an SOS? I tried to run that as a quality session, building up to moderate pace, when I did the plan. I do remember reading that LR definition multiple times though as I felt the book didn't really make the required pace clear (between easy aerobic A, B and moderate aerobic).

    Edit: I didn't run every LR at moderate pace.




  • Isn't the LR also considered an SOS? I tried to run that as a quality session, building up to moderate pace, when I did the plan. I do remember reading that LR definition multiple times though as I felt the book didn't really make the required pace clear (between easy aerobic A, B and moderate aerobic).

    Edit: I didn't run every LR at moderate pace.

    Yes it is. But only every 2nd week starting from week 3. There is a pace calculator for training paces further back on this thread but in general its about target MP+40secs.

    So treat the LR as an SOS but I never did a warm up, just used the first mile to get up to pace. By the time you get to the 16m the cumulative fatigue is significant. I usually felt wrecked but that I could do more if I had to, and that was enough confidence. Adding warm up and cool down miles could have you out for 18-20m and not what the plan advocates.




  • Yes it is. But only every 2nd week starting from week 3. There is a pace calculator for training paces further back on this thread but in general its about target MP+40secs.

    So treat the LR as an SOS but I never did a warm up, just used the first mile to get up to pace. By the time you get to the 16m the cumulative fatigue is significant. I usually felt wrecked but that I could do more if I had to, and that was enough confidence. Adding warm up and cool down miles could have you out for 18-20m and not what the plan advocates.


    Good to know. I would have been adding in a warm up and warm down mile on the Long run. Cheers.




  • Murph_D wrote:
    How much mileage were you putting in over the four days? I think that's a more important number than the frequency. And which version of Hanson are you considering?

    Murph_D wrote:
    How much mileage were you putting in over the four days? I think that's a more important number than the frequency. And which version of Hanson are you considering?


    When training for DCM between 35 - 45, peaking at 45, I was torn between beginner and advanced but with the beginner program the first 5 weeks have low mileage so I don't know what to do, my current base is around 30 miles a week




  • As mentioned in op I've used Hanson with success in London 2017 where I managed 3:01:18 which was a 14 min pb.

    It looks like I'll be having a go at DCM this year and I'm going to go with the Hanson Advanced plan again as I trust it.

    I'm conscious that my running base is lacking ( not much mileage over the last year) so just have to be wary of that and not get carried away with lofty ambitions. I ran Dunshaughlin 10k last weekend as a rough guide to what I might achieve and will base training paces off that result and also just keep an eye on the HR that I'm not blowing a gasket.

    I personally like the plan because I found in previous marathon programs that the 20m+ runs appear to generate injuries so this seemed a good solution. It is a draining, relentless program that will test your resolve ...but it works. It'll be interesting to see how I get on though with less base mileage behind me.

    Anyway ...once more unto the breach


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  • Ferris B wrote:
    I'm conscious that my running base is lacking ( not much mileage over the last year) so just have to be wary of that and not get carried away with lofty ambitions. I ran Dunshaughlin 10k last weekend as a rough guide to what I might achieve and will base training paces off that result and also just keep an eye on the HR that I'm not blowing a gasket.

    Im just curious what kind of a base have you got, and if you don't mind me asking how you got on in dunshaughlin and what time are you now hoping for in Dublin. Sorry for the questions, but I've started the advanced plan, and have, also ran the dunshaughlin finishing in around 42mins, but would you always base your DCM time on 1 race, when you are definitely going to get faster and stronger throughout the year


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