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Galway's traffic issues

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  • Posts: 24,714 [Deleted User]


    xckjoo wrote: »
    But there's only a small percentage of cars make the journey that the bypass covers. Something like 3%. There's also no major population areas west of the river so it's not like (for example) the Athlone bypass that people use going to/from Dublin.

    The lines of traffic morning and evening are not going into the city Centre so that stat is flawed by considering areas outside the city as being in the city city Centre if it is even true to begin with. I would guess that it is also playing with the numbers and only considering people who make the entire journey and ignores the people who would make partial journeys which is really where the road will be of massive benefit, but the anti-car brigade will do what ever they can to hold back the city it appears from this vital piece of infrastructure.

    Traffic crossing from west to east and east to west of the city in the mornings would massively benefit from the bypass, everyone working in parkmore etc would benefit, people coming in from the Headford and Tuam directions would benefit as they could join the road to get to destinations on the west or east of the city and subarbs without going near the city and getting caught up in traffic that does want to be in the city Centre. Same for cars wanting to get down the Dublin motorway or Oranmore etc wanting to get to the west of the city.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,301 ✭✭✭gordongekko


    McGiver wrote: »
    No offence intended but by wasteland I meant very low population density, which is a fact however you want to spin it....

    There are in the region of 50000 people living and working in a 5square mile radius of the planned bridge. This is not a low population density area


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 308 ✭✭Johnny_BravoIII


    If you can’t see how vital the bypass is you are either blinded by your anti-car opinions or have a very poor understanding of galways traffic.

    It is one of the single most important and vital things neeeded for the county and city for many many years.

    It should be fast tracked as an emergeeny requirement and exempted from the majority of buracuracry that will hold it up.

    It's like the guy who turns up to the doctor for his 3rd heart bypass.
    At some point he has to look at diet and excercise.

    Since the foundation of the state we have not done "planning".
    This bypass will not only ruin some beautiful countryside close to the city which acts as a great amenity to locals, but it will also serve to blow the population out across a futher area blighting the landscape with more bloody bungalows.

    The M50 did not fix Dublin's traffic issues, it only served to trap people in houses in the midlands getting up at 5.30 am to make the 1.5 to 2 hour journey to the city centre.

    This is not a life we should be selling people into. The purpose of leadership is to lead. There is a better way.

    With good planning and investment in public transport we can solve our traffic issues and increase the quality of the lives of our citizens.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,170 ✭✭✭✭JCX BXC


    Exactly, so let's use your analogy of looking at your diet, and look at our planning. Roads don't dictate the building of houses, planning does.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,965 ✭✭✭what_traffic


    McGiver wrote: »
    No offence intended but by wasteland I meant very low population density, which is a fact however you want to spin it...
    I don't disagree with the access argument of yours but last time I looked I've seen several roads going from the west to the east on the map. Who do you need more roads for? There's no density.

    None taken (was raised in that area) - understood was in relation to density. Vast interior in Connemara; practically nobody lives there. Along the Coast, Moycullen and Oughterard is where people live. Lets sort out public transport from Moycullen and Spiddal.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,446 ✭✭✭McGiver


    There are in the region of 50000 people living and working in a 5square mile radius of the planned bridge. This is not a low population density area

    Are you including Galway City into this? That can't be West Co. Galway.

    If true this would mean density 7812/sq. km which I can tell you is a total nonsense, because Dublin City density is 4800/sq km.

    Galway County as a whole has a density of 42/sq. km.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,931 ✭✭✭✭Mrs OBumble


    McGiver wrote: »
    Are you including Galway City into this? That can't be West Co. Galway.

    If true this would mean density 7812/sq. km which I can tell you is a total nonsense, because Dublin City density is 4800/sq km.

    Galway County as a whole has a density of 42/sq. km.

    I think the trick is in "and working". NUIG and UGH-Newcastle are within that radius, and employ a lot of people who live elsewhere.

    Galway roads daily serve lots of non-Galway people. Also enormous numbers come, go through a small part of the city (Headford or Parkmore roads) and then exit the city again to work in Parkmore. They don't show up in the stats, because they aren't city residents or workers.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,301 ✭✭✭gordongekko


    McGiver wrote: »
    Are you including Galway City into this? That can't be West Co. Galway.

    If true this would mean density 7812/sq. km which I can tell you is a total nonsense, because Dublin City density is 4800/sq km.

    Galway County as a whole has a density of 42/sq. km.

    This is where your argument falls down. The people of Annaghdown or Cleggan wont be the main users of the bridge. The 50000 people who have need to travel the route on a regular basis are the target market. The people who live west of the river don't consider themselves to be part of a wasteland. The main hospital and university arent build on wasteland. The people of newcastle, knocknacrra, Rahoon, Dangan, Salthill Terryland, Wellpark, Ballybane aren't part of a wasteland.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,963 ✭✭✭✭zell12


    This is where your argument falls down. ...
    The people of newcastle, knocknacrra, Rahoon, Dangan, Salthill Terryland, Wellpark, Ballybane aren't part of a wasteland.

    I thought it was a bypass :confused:
    but it is clearly a fourth bridge for Galway to open up land for development


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,301 ✭✭✭gordongekko


    zell12 wrote: »
    I thought it was a bypass :confused:
    but it is clearly a fourth bridge for Galway to open up land for development

    That's also not in the planning documents. So you are also trying to create a reason for not building the road based on a reason that's not being made to build the road


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,965 ✭✭✭what_traffic


    This is where your argument falls down. The people of Annaghdown or Cleggan wont be the main users of the bridge. The 50000 people who have need to travel the route on a regular basis are the target market. The people who live west of the river don't consider themselves to be part of a wasteland. The main hospital and university arent build on wasteland. The people of newcastle, knocknacrra, Rahoon, Dangan, Salthill Terryland, Wellpark, Ballybane aren't part of a wasteland.

    This is where your argument died.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,446 ✭✭✭McGiver


    This is where your argument falls down. The people of Annaghdown or Cleggan wont be the main users of the bridge. The 50000 people who have need to travel the route on a regular basis are the target market. The people who live west of the river don't consider themselves to be part of a wasteland. The main hospital and university arent build on wasteland. The people of newcastle, knocknacrra, Rahoon, Dangan, Salthill Terryland, Wellpark, Ballybane aren't part of a wasteland.


    I.e. Intra City traffic. A bit expensive for that purpose. And Galway City doesn't have the density you suggested, it's several times lower.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Some data to digest

    Some caveats

    1. It's Vodafone users only
    2. It's 4g users only
    3. It doesn't factor in mode of transport

    The pdf file linked below gives the network figures for 2016 (newest I could find) so from those it's possible to extrapolate a more realistic figure. I just don't have time to try calculate it so someone else might have a go

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.comreg.ie/media/dlm_uploads/2017/03/ComReg-1715r.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwj7rPGt-Z3iAhV7VBUIHajWCFEQFjALegQIARAB&usg=AOvVaw1E72tqOhJ0gSBaz83qKllP


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,931 ✭✭✭✭Mrs OBumble


    Some data to digest



    Some caveats

    1. It's Vodafone users only
    2. It's 4g users only
    3. It doesn't factor in mode of transport

    The pdf file linked below gives the network figures for 2016 (newest I could find) so from those it's possible to extrapolate a more realistic figure. I just don't have time to try calculate it so someone else might have a go

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.comreg.ie/media/dlm_uploads/2017/03/ComReg-1715r.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwj7rPGt-Z3iAhV7VBUIHajWCFEQFjALegQIARAB&usg=AOvVaw1E72tqOhJ0gSBaz83qKllP

    Presumably it counts Parkmore as the city. Making it more useful than many other datasets.

    Anyone know what Vodafone's market share is?


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Presumably it counts Parkmore as the city. Making it more useful than many other datasets.

    Anyone know what Vodafone's market share is?

    37%


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,965 ✭✭✭what_traffic


    37%

    24,000 has to be the overall figure.
    Its up 4,000 since 2015/16 - when 20,000 was the figure given in the GCRR stats of Inbound Commuters into Galway City from the County(and neighboring County's)

    Luckily we have P&R on each approach road into Galway City to handle this volume of Commuters :rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,931 ✭✭✭✭Mrs OBumble


    24,000 has to be the overall figure.
    Its up 4,000 since 2015/16 - when 20,000 was the figure given in the GCRR stats of Inbound Commuters into Galway City from the County(and neighboring County's)

    I'd expect it to be a lot higher than that especially once you realise students are included.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,965 ✭✭✭what_traffic


    I'd expect it to be a lot higher than that especially once you realise students are included.
    24,000 has to be the overall figure.
    I meant Overall in the context of the "Out of City" Commuters.
    Will have roughly the same figure if not slightly more commuting to work and education within the City giving in about 50,0000 figure in total


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,301 ✭✭✭gordongekko


    This is where your argument died.

    :rolleyes:
    McGiver wrote: »
    I.e. Intra City traffic. A bit expensive for that purpose. And Galway City doesn't have the density you suggested, it's several times lower.

    Still not getting the point that this will have a huge positive impact on the daily lives of everyone in the area of the city. You mention wasteland and ignore actual usage.

    The bridge was designed for 20000 daily trips and currently has 37000 daily trips it's way over capacity.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,387 ✭✭✭xckjoo


    :rolleyes:



    Still not getting the point that this will have a huge positive impact on the daily lives of everyone in the area of the city. You mention wasteland and ignore actual usage.

    The bridge was designed for 20000 daily trips and currently has 37000 daily trips it's way over capacity.

    I wonder what percentage of those are single occupancy trips going to and from work in high density population areas to high density workplace areas. If we could get the majority of them on public transport it would bring that number down quickly


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  • Posts: 24,714 [Deleted User]


    xckjoo wrote: »
    I wonder what percentage of those are single occupancy trips going to and from work in high density population areas to high density workplace areas. If we could get the majority of them on public transport it would bring that number down quickly

    But many people don’t want to use public transport or it’s not suitable for their needs. Modern roads networks and infrastructure are needed in the city to accommodate those who want or need to drive.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,446 ✭✭✭McGiver


    Still not getting the point that this will have a huge positive impact on the daily lives of everyone in the area of the city. You mention wasteland and ignore actual usage.
    You had mentioned several times higher population density than reality. Probably pulled it out of a hat. So what's the point of talking about any numbers if they are not correct?

    Please explain what kind of positive impact it will have exactly and specifically.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,931 ✭✭✭✭Mrs OBumble


    But many people don’t want to use public transport or it’s not suitable for their needs. Modern roads networks and infrastructure are needed in the city to accommodate those who want or need to drive.

    I have no problem accommodating those who NEED to drive. Eg farmers attending a hospital appointment.

    But the too-posh-to-share and I-wanna-live-on-farm-but-not-farm- it brigades can feck right off. The planet cannot afford to accommodate them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,064 ✭✭✭Guffy


    Anyone who believes that Galway does not need a byepass is either deluded or doesn't drive. The traffic around the bridge is nuts at the best of times. If there is a crash or a light malfunctio, it can take 3 hours to get from parkmore to the Newcastle road.


    The likes of Mike Geraghty are living on cloud coo coo if he thinks 'T3' or "bendy buses" are going to solve the problem for us.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,367 ✭✭✭fergiesfolly


    I have no problem accommodating those who NEED to drive. Eg farmers attending a hospital appointment.

    But the too-posh-to-share and I-wanna-live-on-farm-but-not-farm- it brigades can feck right off. The planet cannot afford to accommodate them.

    But it can afford to accommodate you, who travelled half way round the planet to set up home here and then spend every waking moment pissing and moaning about the place.

    I hope to set up home outside the city one day, but my place of work and hours I work, mean that public transport will not be an option that I can take, so I will drive into the city everyday. As will thousands of others in exactly the same situation.
    Or are we all supposed to cram into the city so we can counteract the enormous carbon footprint you created, just by getting here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,446 ✭✭✭McGiver


    Guffy wrote:
    The likes of Mike Geraghty are living on cloud coo coo if he thinks 'T3' or "bendy buses" are going to solve the problem for us.

    What's wrong about bendy buses? That they are bendy and hence you've never seen them in action? Or that you believe that they can't work because they are...well...bendy :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,446 ✭✭✭McGiver


    But many people don’t want to use public transport or it’s not suitable for their needs. Modern roads networks and infrastructure are needed in the city to accommodate those who want or need to drive.
    People are free to do whatever they wish if it is legal. But those people who voluntarily chose using car will need to pay more - in monetary terms and temporal terms etc. They will need to pay for a luxury that is a using personal vehicle causing congestion, pollution, lower quality of life and inconvenience to the city's residents. Using car in a large city is a luxury and should be perceived and regulated as such by the City Council.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,367 ✭✭✭fergiesfolly


    McGiver wrote: »
    People are free to do whatever they wish if it is legal. But those people who voluntarily chose using car will need to pay more - in monetary terms and temporal terms etc. They will need to pay for a luxury that is a using personal vehicle causing congestion, pollution, lower quality of life and inconvenience to the city's residents. Using car in a large city is a luxury and should be perceived and regulated as such by the City Council.

    But they do pay for it.
    In taxation. VRT, tax on fuel, road tolls etc.
    Cars are not a luxury for the people who have no other mode of transport.
    Let government build the infrastructure, so people can ditch their cars. And then increase taxation if they don't.
    Do people on these threads realise how many people travel into this city at 6am in the morning. Or at 11pm at night. Where are the public transport links for these thousands of people?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,301 ✭✭✭gordongekko


    McGiver wrote: »
    People are free to do whatever they wish if it is legal. But those people who voluntarily chose using car will need to pay more - in monetary terms and temporal terms etc. They will need to pay for a luxury that is a using personal vehicle causing congestion, pollution, lower quality of life and inconvenience to the city's residents. Using car in a large city is a luxury and should be perceived and regulated as such by the City Council.

    WOuld you please decide what your argument actually is? First it was don't build it because its just connecting a wasteland, now its some waffle about it being a luxury. A road is not a luxury.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 693 ✭✭✭grbear


    If the next government was truly serious about getting people on to public transport then they'd announce a five year plan to increase funding for Bus Éireann, Iaranroid Éireann and Dublin Bus by 20% each year while reducing ticket prices by 10% each year.


    A bypass is only going to solve Galways traffic issues if it's accompanied by a change in how the City is run. If we keep doing things the same way then it'll only offer a short term relief before going back to the way it is now.


This discussion has been closed.
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