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EU Vote down Far Right in Hungary

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  • 12-09-2018 1:05pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 33,856 ✭✭✭✭


    So,

    Can anyone explain the vote that happened in the EU parliament today in Plain. I dont understand it nor its significance. Short that there was alot of celebration amongst the Greens.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,638 ✭✭✭Qrt


    listermint wrote: »
    So,

    Can anyone explain the vote that happened in the EU parliament today in Plain. I dont understand it nor its significance. Short that there was alot of celebration amongst the Greens.

    Hungary seems to have broken many many rules of the EU and thus are probably facing consequences.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,803 ✭✭✭An Ciarraioch


    Among other things, they have closed down various opposition media outlets, and a university funded by George Soros in Budapest.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,086 ✭✭✭Elmer Blooker


    Qrt wrote: »
    Hungary seems to have broken many many rules of the EU and thus are probably facing consequences.
    So has Poland but the EU chooses to ignore this and look the other way.
    Why is this? The explanation is quite simple, Hungary PM Orban is getting a bit too friendly with Putin while Poland on the other hand is pro-US and fanatically anti Russia. No slap on the wrist for poster boys Poland. ;)
    https://www.hrw.org/report/2017/10/24/eroding-checks-and-balances/rule-law-and-human-rights-under-attack-poland


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,856 ✭✭✭✭listermint


    So has Poland but the EU chooses to ignore this and look the other way.
    Why is this? The explanation is quite simple, Hungary PM Orban is getting a bit too friendly with Putin while Poland on the other hand is pro-US and fanatically anti Russia. No slap on the wrist for poster boys Poland. ;)
    https://www.hrw.org/report/2017/10/24/eroding-checks-and-balances/rule-law-and-human-rights-under-attack-poland

    Yes, And the US EU Relationship is tight as ever these days...


    Correct ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,911 ✭✭✭✭VinLieger


    So has Poland but the EU chooses to ignore this and look the other way.
    Why is this? The explanation is quite simple, Hungary PM Orban is getting a bit too friendly with Putin while Poland on the other hand is pro-US and fanatically anti Russia. No slap on the wrist for poster boys Poland. ;)
    https://www.hrw.org/report/2017/10/24/eroding-checks-and-balances/rule-law-and-human-rights-under-attack-poland


    Well that's a lie the Poland issue simply has yet to make it to the parliament for discussion and a vote


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  • Registered Users Posts: 11,300 ✭✭✭✭jm08


    So has Poland but the EU chooses to ignore this and look the other way.
    Why is this? The explanation is quite simple, Hungary PM Orban is getting a bit too friendly with Putin while Poland on the other hand is pro-US and fanatically anti Russia. No slap on the wrist for poster boys Poland. ;)
    https://www.hrw.org/report/2017/10/24/eroding-checks-and-balances/rule-law-and-human-rights-under-attack-poland


    Poland is bound to block the santions against Hungary (a unaminous vote is also required by the European Council).


    What will be interesting to see is what May will do.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,300 ✭✭✭✭jm08


    VinLieger wrote: »
    Well that's a lie the Poland issue simply has yet to make it to the parliament for discussion and a vote


    And the Greens will be gunning for them over the tree felling in world heritage site forests.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 38,158 CMod ✭✭✭✭ancapailldorcha


    Article 7 allows the EU to sanction member states which breach its core principles. Orban has been attacking the media and Universities on his road to build a kleptocracy in Hungary so its good to see the EU actually do something about it. If Hungarians feel that their sovereignty is being abused, they can always vote to leave and the EU will be better off.

    We sat again for an hour and a half discussing maps and figures and always getting back to that most damnable creation of the perverted ingenuity of man - the County of Tyrone.

    H. H. Asquith



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,202 ✭✭✭✭Hurrache


    So has Poland but the EU chooses to ignore this and look the other way.
    VinLieger wrote: »
    Well that's a lie the Poland issue simply has yet to make it to the parliament for discussion and a vote

    The EU is also has initiated steps to start legal proceedings against Poland because of how they're trying to push changes into their court system by pushing judges out.

    Just people people aren't aware of these things, doesn't mean the EU isn't doing anything and there's some conspiracy going on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,086 ✭✭✭Elmer Blooker


    listermint wrote: »
    Yes, And the US EU Relationship is tight as ever these days...


    Correct ?
    Not really. A "relationship" isn't and shouldn't be about making threats.
    French energy giant Total decided it would be wise to put America's interests ahead of their own and pulled out of Iran despite some tough talking from the Finance Minister initially.
    Bruno Le Maire, the French finance minister, said last week: “We have to work among ourselves in Europe to defend our European economic sovereignty.”
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/13/us-sanctions-european-countries-iran-deal-donald-trump


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  • Registered Users Posts: 33,856 ✭✭✭✭listermint


    Not really. A "relationship" isn't and shouldn't be about making threats.
    French energy giant Total decided it would be wise to put America's interests ahead of their own and pulled out of Iran despite some tough talking from the Finance Minister initially.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/may/13/us-sanctions-european-countries-iran-deal-donald-trump

    ???

    French energy maker decided to leave due to financial reasons. Its nothing to do with political affiliations.

    Pure money


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,070 ✭✭✭Franz Von Peppercorn


    Article 7 allows the EU to sanction member states which breach its core principles. Orban has been attacking the media and Universities on his road to build a kleptocracy in Hungary so its good to see the EU actually do something about it. If Hungarians feel that their sovereignty is being abused, they can always vote to leave and the EU will be better off.

    His attack on certain subjects in the universities is no different from the opposite over here - universities burying science papers for instance.

    And the media? A corporate sh1t show. The internet is worth protecting but that’s the very thing the EU isn’t protecting.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 38,158 CMod ✭✭✭✭ancapailldorcha


    His attack on certain subjects in the universities is no different from the opposite over here - universities burying science papers for instance.

    What papers are being buried?
    And the media? A corporate sh1t show. The internet is worth protecting but that’s the very thing the EU isn’t protecting.

    Based on what, exactly? Orban's opinion? One person shouldn't be allowed to define what is acceptable.

    We sat again for an hour and a half discussing maps and figures and always getting back to that most damnable creation of the perverted ingenuity of man - the County of Tyrone.

    H. H. Asquith



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,570 ✭✭✭RandomName2


    Based on what, exactly? Orban's opinion? One person shouldn't be allowed to define what is acceptable.

    One person elected by the people. He is the representative of Hungary, but we know that Hungary doesn't really matter in the EU, and Orban is in a weak position in Brussels, so the disgraced Junker can literally slap him in the face if he likes.
    If Hungarians feel that their sovereignty is being abused, they can always vote to leave and the EU will be better off.

    Like a sinking ship, right? Greece and Italy are two other countries genuinely teetering on potentially leaving, while Poland, Romania, and the Czech Republic are also getting a bit tired of the Merkel-Macron government. There's a point at which the hubris of saying that the smaller countries don't matter might come back to bite the bureaucrats (which includes Ireland if you remember how we were treated in 2008). Italy isn't a smaller country though, and the imminent loss of the UK has been pretty sorely felt..

    While the independence of the media is an important thing, it is true, I can't help but feel that the bureaucrats would have looked the other way if it hadn't been for Hungary observing the Dublin convention.


  • Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 28,795 Mod ✭✭✭✭oscarBravo


    One person elected by the people. He is the representative of Hungary...
    So what? Are you arguing that the leader of an EU country can choose to ignore the EU's rules on the basis of having been elected?

    If that's what you're arguing, are you aware of what a stupid argument it is?
    ...but we know that Hungary doesn't really matter in the EU...
    No, we don't know that. That's the sort of thing that's "known" by people who like to invent their own snide little narratives that have no basis in trivia like "rules".
    ...disgraced Junker...
    It's a pity you didn't randomly capitalise a few words in your post. A career writing for the Express could have beckoned.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 38,158 CMod ✭✭✭✭ancapailldorcha


    One person elected by the people. He is the representative of Hungary, but we know that Hungary doesn't really matter in the EU, and Orban is in a weak position in Brussels, so the disgraced Junker can literally slap him in the face if he likes.

    Couldn't help yourself to an ad hominem, could you. How do you kow Hungary doesn't matter in the EU? Elaborate bplease.
    Like a sinking ship, right? Greece and Italy are two other countries genuinely teetering on potentially leaving, while Poland, Romania, and the Czech Republic are also getting a bit tired of the Merkel-Macron government. There's a point at which the hubris of saying that the smaller countries don't matter might come back to bite the bureaucrats (which includes Ireland if you remember how we were treated in 2008). Italy isn't a smaller country though, and the imminent loss of the UK has been pretty sorely felt..

    There's a mix of nonsense and conjecture here. Brexit is going to prove to be a better piece of propaganda than the EU could ever make themselves. Greece and Italy have been on the brink of leaving for years and yet are still in somehow. Merkel-Macron government? Proof please.

    Where has the loss of the UK "been pretty sorely felt?"
    While the independence of the media is an important thing, it is true, I can't help but feel that the bureaucrats would have looked the other way if it hadn't been for Hungary observing the Dublin convention.

    A deflection. A free media is crucial to a functioning state. If Hungarians wish to live in a kleptocracy with no free speech then that's their call. The EU has rules. Hungary can leave if it doesn't like them.

    We sat again for an hour and a half discussing maps and figures and always getting back to that most damnable creation of the perverted ingenuity of man - the County of Tyrone.

    H. H. Asquith



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,202 ✭✭✭✭Hurrache


    are also getting a bit tired of the Merkel-Macron government.

    Apart from everything else wrong with your post, Macron has only been French president since last year. As good as he may or may not be, I don't think he's that effective in changing the EU from within to suit his own agenda in such a short period of time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,570 ✭✭✭RandomName2


    oscarBravo wrote: »
    So what? Are you arguing that the leader of an EU country can choose to ignore the EU's rules on the basis of having been elected?

    I'm saying that you can't separate the people from the person if an absolute majority support that person.
    oscarBravo wrote: »
    INo, we don't know that. That's the sort of thing that's "known" by people who like to invent their own snide little narratives that have no basis in trivia like "rules".

    And here was I thinking that politics was a numbers game except where unanimity is demanded. Oh, thread title.
    oscarBravo wrote: »
    It's a pity you didn't randomly capitalise a few words in your post. A career writing for the Express could have beckoned.

    The fact that it's true sticks in the craw a bit, does it?
    Hurrache wrote: »
    Macron has only been French president since last year. As good as he may or may not be, I don't think he's that effective in changing the EU from within to suit his own agenda in such a short period of time.

    My point was more that the power within the organisation of the EU lies with a relatively few individuals. Of particular importance is the French-German dynamic, less-so who is actually president or chancellor.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,202 ✭✭✭✭Hurrache


    The fact that it's true sticks in the craw a bit, does it?

    So tell us, why is he disgraced?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,570 ✭✭✭RandomName2


    Hurrache wrote: »
    So tell us, why is he disgraced?

    Something about spying and dirty tricks, and stepping down as leader in order not to damage his party in the next election despite not taking responsibility - but I mean it worked out in the end for him as he's got friends in high places, and being elected president of the EU commission is not a process open to a public vote. The pro-EU people on the thread will be apologists, I'm sure, as they would feel that having him in his current position is getting them what they want. They'd also probably say that my bringing it up is mostly because I disagree with what he brings to the EU table rather than my having a particular interest in anything to do with internal Luxembourgian politics; but that would be a little bit hypocritical on their part, I think, as I believe the exact same thing is true of them in relation to Orban.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,803 ✭✭✭An Ciarraioch


    oscarBravo wrote: »
    So what? Are you arguing that the leader of an EU country can choose to ignore the EU's rules on the basis of having been elected?

    I'm saying that you can't separate the people from the person if an absolute majority support that person.
    oscarBravo wrote: »
    INo, we don't know that. That's the sort of thing that's "known" by people who like to invent their own snide little narratives that have no basis in trivia like "rules".

    And here was I thinking that politics was a numbers game except where unanimity is demanded. Oh, thread title.
    oscarBravo wrote: »
    It's a pity you didn't randomly capitalise a few words in your post. A career writing for the Express could have beckoned.

    The fact that it's true sticks in the craw a bit, does it?
    Hurrache wrote: »
    Macron has only been French president since last year. As good as he may or may not be, I don't think he's that effective in changing the EU from within to suit his own agenda in such a short period of time.

    My point was more that the power within the organisation of the EU lies with a relatively few individuals. Of particular importance is the French-German dynamic, less-so who is actually president or chancellor.

    By that reckoning, the people of Russia and Turkey are inseparable from the actions of Putin and Erdogan, which would hardly reflect well on either nationality. It is entirely reasonable to suggest that the Hungarian government closed media outlets before joining the EU, then accession talks would never have been completed, so what would have been unacceptable then, remains so now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,202 ✭✭✭✭Hurrache


    "Something about.." What exactly?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,570 ✭✭✭RandomName2


    By that reckoning, the people of Russia are inseparable from the actions of Putin

    Yeah because the man on the street in Russia was totally unaffected by the sanctions 'on Putin'. :rolleyes: Besides which, ancapailldorcha actually spelled it out in black and white, basically that Hungary can gtfo and we'd be better for it.
    Hurrache wrote: »
    "Something about.." What exactly?

    Let yourself google that for you. I'm guessing you're not going to care, either way.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,202 ✭✭✭✭Hurrache


    Let yourself google that for you. I'm guessing you're not going to care, either way.

    That's not how it works. You made the claims, you were asked what claims, and you're runinng away from those claims now so all I can assume is it's hearsay or agenda driven.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,570 ✭✭✭RandomName2


    Hurrache wrote: »
    That's not how it works. You made the claims, you were asked what claims, and you're runinng away from those claims now so all I can assume is it's hearsay or agenda driven.

    It seems that posts that include lmgtfy links are automatically deleted. :D

    In all seriousness, google 'jean claude juncker spying' and pick anything on the first page of results if you want to, but I'm telling you now that you're probably not going to care if you already feel that he's batting for you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,375 ✭✭✭✭prawnsambo


    Something about spying and dirty tricks, and stepping down as leader in order not to damage his party in the next election despite not taking responsibility - but I mean it worked out in the end for him as he's got friends in high places, and being elected president of the EU commission is not a process open to a public vote. The pro-EU people on the thread will be apologists, I'm sure, as they would feel that having him in his current position is getting them what they want. They'd also probably say that my bringing it up is mostly because I disagree with what he brings to the EU table rather than my having a particular interest in anything to do with internal Luxembourgian politics; but that would be a little bit hypocritical on their part, I think, as I believe the exact same thing is true of them in relation to Orban.
    Or you could be talking rubbish. Juncker's only implication in the spying scandal was that he was bugged himself. He resigned because he didn't know it was going on. And had been assured as such at the time he was being bugged.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,934 ✭✭✭Renegade Mechanic


    So has Poland but the EU chooses to ignore this and look the other way.
    Why is this? The explanation is quite simple, Hungary PM Orban is getting a bit too friendly with Putin while Poland on the other hand is pro-US and fanatically anti Russia. No slap on the wrist for poster boys Poland. ;)
    https://www.hrw.org/report/2017/10/24/eroding-checks-and-balances/rule-law-and-human-rights-under-attack-poland

    Poland will be getting a "boot on the neck" at some stage. Their relationship with the U.S is taking a beating too, because their judiciary crisis affects the U.S.

    To understand this, look back a bit.
    [URL="https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/447]https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/447[/URL].

    "This bill directs the Department of State, with respect to covered countries, to annually include within either the relevant Annual Country Report on Human Rights, the International Religious Freedom Report, or other appropriate report an assessment of the nature and extent of national laws or enforceable policies regarding the identification, return, or restitution of wrongfully seized or transferred Holocaust era assets and compliance with the goals of the Terezin Declaration on Holocaust Era Assets and Related Issues".

    The covered countries of course including Poland.
    With U.S backing the groups efforts would have sailed through the Polish courts, being as rightfully stated U.S friendly as they were, and billions upon billions in money and assets would be seized.
    The judiciary crisis that followed has put the brakes on that train for now but it flies in the face of U.S wishes. Personally, I find it difficult to disagree with the Polish on this one.

    It must be one hell of a slap in the face to see people referring to "Polish" death camps lately, like the Polish had a choice in the matter. Like Poland is even in the position to afford it. Like millions of Polnische Untermenschen, weren't also killed following Himmler's decree that "All Poles will disappear from the world…. It is essential that the great German people should consider it as its major task to destroy all Poles”, in their quest for "lebensraum".
    So fear not. They'll be reigned in, too.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 38,158 CMod ✭✭✭✭ancapailldorcha


    Ditch the petty name calling and link dumping please. Post deleted.

    We sat again for an hour and a half discussing maps and figures and always getting back to that most damnable creation of the perverted ingenuity of man - the County of Tyrone.

    H. H. Asquith



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,993 ✭✭✭✭recedite


    Every country has its "red line" issues. Hungarians refused to become a migrant transit camp for Merkels migrants. Now they are being punished.
    Juncker said they are obliged to accept a majority EU vote which forces them to accept mandatory migrant quotas. Technically. The EU rule book says he is right. But in realpolitik, he is wrong. Hungary refused.


    Recently, Juncker had some more wine and decided to have a go at Ireland.
    European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker launched another assault on Irish powers to veto tax matters at European level.
    The European Union should scrap some national vetos on tax, he said at his annual State of the Union address to the European Parliament in Strasbourg.
    Yes, he will be coming for us next.


    People on this thread who think Hungary is "an outlier" and "we're better off without them" are sadly misguided. They support Junckers authoritarian stance, while asserting that they are against "the rise of authoritarianism".
    They decry "populism" when it is in fact democracy in action.
    they are the stay-at-home equivalent of antifa militants who dress in black balaclavas and go out looking for "fascists" to beat over the head with clubs.
    Austria and Hungary were always at the geographical and cultural heart of Europe. Vienna had concerts with Beethoven, and Budapest had heated swimming pools and saunas centuries ago, when most Irish people still lived in mud cabins.


    The future of Europe will see two competing spheres of influence. In the west France Belgium and Spain. In the east;Poland, Lithuania, Estonia, Slovenia, Czech Republic, Austria, Hungary, Italy.


    In the middle, an increasing fractious and divided Germany. Fondly remembering those heady days before 2015 when Germany reached its post-war zenith - a strong, united and confident country leading a confident EU. But that was before Merkels EU open borders policy led to hostility with eastern countries and encouraged the Brexiteers to leave.



    And way out in the Atlantic, beyond non-EU European countries like Norway and UK, lies Ireland. Bravely following Juncker down the coalmine, even as more and more canaries fall off their perch.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,993 ✭✭✭✭recedite


    As my links to "drunk juncker" youtube videos have been deleted by the mod, people should google it themselves.


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