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Tubeless road - it actually works

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8,188 ✭✭✭07Lapierre


    See that's my point.. i communte all year round. i just dont like the thought of getting a puncture (that does not seal) on a cold, wet, dark night on my way home and having to either A: try and fix a a tubeless tyre, B: fit a tube into a tyre covered in sealant (and maybe have difficulty removing a tubeless valve thats siezed onto the rim) or C: call my wife to collect me! Even if it only happened once every few years i think its too much of a pain. I find that i don't really get that many punctures anyway (maybe one per year) so for me, the convenience of tubes trumps the comfort of tubeless.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,271 ✭✭✭Paddigol


    I run tubeless for CX. I can't begin to imagine the hassle of cycling in those conditions with tubes. Presumably back in the day punctures were part of the race day experience and pit crews a necessity. Maybe tubeless is part of the reason for its growth in popularity in recent years?

    Which brings me to the question I still can't seem to get a definitive answer to from the tubeless converts - I'm presuming that you essentially never get punctures? I mean, I run tubes on my road bike and almost never get punctures - maybe one a year. On club spins over the past 4/5 years I've had one. And commuting I had one last year (an industrial staple), one a good few years ago (pinch flat - my fault). The only thing that would convert me to tubeless is the idea that I could run more comfortable/ sexy/ racy tyres, maybe run a lower pressure, and still have NO punctures.

    The only reason I can think that you'd flat on a tubeless set up is if you didn't top up with sealant (a little bit of monitoring required, no big deal) or you got a massive hole in the tyre - which in roads, I just can't imagine how you could do that?

    I'm yet to be convinced to make the switch.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,809 ✭✭✭Roberto_gas


    its alright just keep few tissues and a tube..i sorted myself in 10 mins…same process with a tube just the sealant bit is diff



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭JMcL


    The comfort comes from being able to run them at a lower pressure, The backroads around my neck of the woods are like washboards and 28mm tubeless @ about 70psi feels a lot comfier than tubed (albeit they were 25mm) @ 95psi



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,188 ✭✭✭07Lapierre


    Yeah that's what i meant, its the tyres/tyre pressures that make a bike comfortable, not the lack of a inner tube. I have 32mm tyres inflated to 60psi, while my road bike tyres (25mm) are at 100psi. Both have inner tubes.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,188 ✭✭✭07Lapierre


    No i'm not in a hurry to change over either. I would consider tubeless for racing wheels but not for commuting/club spins etc. I think a lot of people will end up getting punctures in their tubeless tyres because they will try and get more life out of their tyres and they probably won't replace the sealant when required.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,066 ✭✭✭Bambaata


    Im new to the club having just bought a new Giant, whats the best race tubeless tyre and sealant about? Silca sealant and replenisher rated? Im also on hookless rims so thatll be a factor!



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,087 ✭✭✭nilhg


    I'm running Gp5000 32mm at between 45 and 50psi, down to 40 at times I reckon (I'm 88kg for reference) with no problems since early spring with plenty of really rough backroads in the mix. With 40mm terraspeed gravel tires I'll run at between 35 and 40psi, that's where you'll really see a difference in comfort on rough gravel surfaces, better grip running softer too.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,406 ✭✭✭Gerry


    further update, the front panaracer tlc slick despite not being worn out, got a very small cut on the commute along grand canal greenway. Will not fully seal despite topping up with copious sealant. so thats lasted 10 months.

    Went for panaracer semi slick replacement. a fair bit thicker. not fitted yet, will report back. will swap it onto the back.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,087 ✭✭✭nilhg


    Were those slicks the standard ones or the plus version? Plus does seem to be quite a bit better for puncture resistance and longevity, I've had a couple of sets of slicks and a pair of SKs and had none of the troubles I see reported often.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,406 ✭✭✭Gerry


    the slicks were not plus. I got one plus to try it. And one semi slick which it turns out is not plus, but is thicker than the plus slick. Lets see how these go.

    Good to hear you got on well with the plus.



  • Registered Users Posts: 236 ✭✭Birka


    Would you consider using a plug to give the sealant a hand? I got a biggish cut on one tyre which sealed fine with a plug + sealant. It's no harm to carry a plug or two on, just in case, as sealant on its own has limitations

    e.g.

    https://ride.lezyne.com/products/tubeless-kit



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,406 ✭✭✭Gerry


    have plugs and used them on mtb tyres in past. but these cuts have all been smaller than the thinnest plug or the tool for pushing them in. like, tiny.. 1-2mm



  • Registered Users Posts: 236 ✭✭Birka


    I started off using Effetto Mariposa sealant but moved to Muc-Off No Puncture Hassle sealant as it can plug bigger holes (up to 6mm). It might be worth considering if you have problems with smaller cuts on the new tyre. The only other thing that is worth doing is to keep the pressure quite low in the immediate aftermath of a puncture and to park the bike overnight with the cut at the lowest part of the wheel to allow the sealant to pool there for a while.



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,195 ✭✭✭Macy0161




  • Registered Users Posts: 4,406 ✭✭✭Gerry


    I tried muc off also. I do think this was a tyre specific issue. what tyres do you run yourself?



  • Registered Users Posts: 236 ✭✭Birka


    It does sound like it was a tyre issue.

    I'm currently using Hutchinson Fusion 5 All Season 11 Storm (to give them their full title...) on my commuter and am very happy with them. Mostly used around Dublin where there's plenty of glass on my route. I pick out any little bits of glass from my tyres every few days and generally don't get many punctures.

    I have GP 5000S tubeless on my 'good' bike and am very disappointed in their quality. No puncture issues as they're used on rural roads but they are falling apart.



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