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Internet Addiction?

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Comments

  • #2


    mzungu wrote: »
    That would certainly be a way to be able to reach a large number of respondents.
    Population parameters? Sampling? Random or convenience?
    mzungu wrote: »
    However, I think if this was also backed up with interviews then it would provide the best of both worlds.
    Mixed methods. Triangulation analytics. Creswell?


  • #2


    Fathom wrote: »
    Population parameters? Sampling? Random or convenience?
    Identifying and accessing the population may be a problem as suggested by your comments.


  • #2


    Fathom wrote: »
    Population parameters? Sampling? Random or convenience?
    Random sampling would be my preferred choice here. From there look for commonalities across respondents.
    Fathom wrote: »
    Mixed methods. Triangulation analytics. Creswell?

    Absolutely. You can't go wrong with Creswell IMO.


  • #2


    mzungu wrote: »
    Random sampling would be my preferred choice here.
    As suggested by Fathom above, it might be a problem attempting to identify the population, and if so, then a random sample of an unidentified population would be problematic.
    mzungu wrote: »
    Absolutely. You can't go wrong with Creswell IMO.
    Indeed, Creswell is often used by all of us when conducting multi-methods research, although he is a bit lacking in terms of specific triangulation techniques between qualitative and quantitative, as are other sources.


  • #2


    Black Swan wrote: »
    As suggested by Fathom above, it might be a problem attempting to identify the population, and if so, then a random sample of an unidentified population would be problematic.
    Going on the example from the previous page (people that have dropped out of university) I would divide into age brackets across different places of education search for commonalities. There would be different researchers working for the different education centres analysing the data.
    Black Swan wrote: »
    Indeed, Creswell is often used by all of us when conducting multi-methods research, although he is a bit lacking in terms of specific triangulation techniques between qualitative and quantitative, as are other sources.
    A potential for the area of triangulation to be expanded upon further in social science research method texts?


  • #2


    mzungu wrote: »
    Going on the example from the previous page (people that have dropped out of university) I would divide into age brackets across different places of education search for commonalities. There would be different researchers working for the different education centres analysing the data.
    Population parameters. "People that have dropped out of university." Would university(s) share email addresses of dropouts?


  • #2


    mzungu wrote: »
    A potential for the area of triangulation to be expanded upon further in social science research method texts?
    My experience with past "texts" has been disappointing, to say the least. They cover too much material, and such coverage tends to be too generic and lacking in specifics; i.e., how do you precisely triangulate between quantitative and qualitative methods when analyzing data collected from these two sources, including several specific step-by-step examples from real research projects?
    Fathom wrote: »
    Population parameters. "People that have dropped out of university." Would university(s) share email addresses of dropouts?
    Such "People" may fall into at-risk populations that require regulated protections that make data collections from them challenging (e.g., IRB, etc.).


  • #2


    Research problems noted in Internet addiction thread (above): Abnormal or new normal? Conceptual definition. Measurement. DSM-5 classification. IRB at-risk. Data set ID population parameters. Sampling. Representativeness. Access. Plus add: Will subjects be willing to participate in data collection; if so, to what extent; size; and how will missing data be handled?

    More?


  • #2


    Grand summary.


  • #2


    Black Swan wrote: »
    Grand summary.
    A in methods?


  • #2


    Fathom wrote: »
    A in methods?
    Only bullets discussion.


  • #2


    Black Swan wrote: »
    My experience with past "texts" has been disappointing, to say the least. They cover too much material, and such coverage tends to be too generic and lacking in specifics; i.e., how do you precisely triangulate between quantitative and qualitative methods when analyzing data collected from these two sources, including several specific step-by-step examples from real research projects?
    A business decision perhaps? Larger scope captures everything but may lack in depth detail on research methods such as triangulation due to covering all bases but not quite as well as they should?


  • #2


    mzungu wrote: »
    A business decision perhaps? Larger scope captures everything but may lack in depth detail on research methods such as triangulation due to covering all bases but not quite as well as they should?
    Admittedly, I am more of a numbers cruncher than a mixed-methods triangulator. Then again, some specific research topics may fall short when reviewing their scholarly literature, suggesting that a qualitative or mixed-methods approach may be needed before going to population parameters crunching and estimates.

    My read on the generalized and generic content of texts is that it is attributed to an historically accepted template for such works that goes back decades; i.e. historic traditional standards have been substituted for quality content, context, and timeliness. Anecdotally speaking, I have been accosted by a couple older colleagues that question why I do not use a standardized text in the data analysis class I have taught. Further, I do not teach to text, rather, teach to highly specific research problem(s), often including the review of a peer-reviewed article to evaluate their specific methods and analysis.

    Students can decontextualize from one specific problem domain to another specific problem domain if you motivate and expect them to do so. In our specific case of Internet addiction, we can draw from other specific researches in the biology of behaviour, for example, to see if something can be learned towards the design and conduct of specific research in the very different domain of CBT theory and approaches to examine Internet addiction.

    Yes, in lecture I will refer to the (sadly) general mixed method and triangulation analysis approaches found in John Creswell (Research Design: Qualitative & Quantitative Approaches), George Taylor (Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Methods in Research), and John Brewer and Albert Hunter (Multimethod Research: A Synthesis of Styles), but I will not ask my students to buy such books (at grossly inflated publisher prices).

    The downside for some students is that they cannot survive my classes by merely mastering a text. I've been jokingly told by students that if you miss my lectures, you're dead! I do have my lectures recorded for those that may be sick, sports team travel, competing work demands, etc., which are freely available through our university media resources and online. And everyone knows that I only take attendance on the first day of the academic quarter for class registration purposes, but I do not grade attendance. For whatever reasons, most everyone attends my classes when they can. I generally get good student reviews, so I am not about to change, even if a colleague or two may question my lack of a standardized text.

    **See what you get when I have spent Saturday morning drinking too much coffee at my locale javahouse. Ramble... ramble... ramble... sorry!**


  • #2


    Extraordinary.


  • #2


    Fathom wrote: »
    Extraordinary.
    Naaaaaaaaa... just java addicted, and spouting on this Internet addiction thread.


  • #2


    Black Swan wrote: »
    Admittedly, I am more of a numbers cruncher than a mixed-methods triangulator. Then again, some specific research topics may fall short when reviewing their scholarly literature, suggesting that a qualitative or mixed-methods approach may be needed before going to population parameters crunching and estimates.

    My read on the generalized and generic content of texts is that it is attributed to an historically accepted template for such works that goes back decades; i.e. historic traditional standards have been substituted for quality content, context, and timeliness. Anecdotally speaking, I have been accosted by a couple older colleagues that question why I do not use a standardized text in the data analysis class I have taught. Further, I do not teach to text, rather, teach to highly specific research problem(s), often including the review of a peer-reviewed article to evaluate their specific methods and analysis.

    Students can decontextualize from one specific problem domain to another specific problem domain if you motivate and expect them to do so. In our specific case of Internet addiction, we can draw from other specific researches in the biology of behaviour, for example, to see if something can be learned towards the design and conduct of specific research in the very different domain of CBT theory and approaches to examine Internet addiction.

    Yes, in lecture I will refer to the (sadly) general mixed method and triangulation analysis approaches found in John Creswell (Research Design: Qualitative & Quantitative Approaches), George Taylor (Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Methods in Research), and John Brewer and Albert Hunter (Multimethod Research: A Synthesis of Styles), but I will not ask my students to buy such books (at grossly inflated publisher prices).

    The downside for some students is that they cannot survive my classes by merely mastering a text. I've been jokingly told by students that if you miss my lectures, you're dead! I do have my lectures recorded for those that may be sick, sports team travel, competing work demands, etc., which are freely available through our university media resources and online. And everyone knows that I only take attendance on the first day of the academic quarter for class registration purposes, but I do not grade attendance. For whatever reasons, most everyone attends my classes when they can. I generally get good student reviews, so I am not about to change, even if a colleague or two may question my lack of a standardized text.

    **See what you get when I have spent Saturday morning drinking too much coffee at my locale javahouse. Ramble... ramble... ramble... sorry!**

    Great post. 10/10.

    I am going back a few years here, but when I was in college there was mixed methods research, which differs somewhat (or a lot :D) from triangulation, but I guess mixing quantitative and qualitative is a part of it. You are right not to ask your students to buy the books, they cost a lot and you can gleam the important information from it quite handily.


  • #2


    mzungu wrote: »
    I am going back a few years here, but when I was in college there was mixed methods research, which differs somewhat (or a lot :D) from triangulation, but I guess mixing quantitative and qualitative is a part of it. You are right not to ask your students to buy the books, they cost a lot and you can gleam the important information from it quite handily.
    Mixed methods = quantitative & qualitative methodologies?
    Triangulation = analytic techniques for combining quantitative & qualitative data. Summarizing. Concluding. Reporting. Limitations?


  • #2


    mzungu wrote: »

    I am going back a few years here, but when I was in college there was mixed methods research, which differs somewhat (or a lot :D) from triangulation, but I guess mixing quantitative and qualitative is a part of it.
    Yo mzungu. How do you differ between mixed methods & triangulation?


  • #2


    Fathom wrote: »
    Mixed methods = quantitative & qualitative methodologies?
    Triangulation = analytic techniques for combining quantitative & qualitative data. Summarizing. Concluding. Reporting. Limitations?
    One's methods, the other is data analysis.


  • #2


    Black Swan wrote: »
    One's methods, the other is data analysis.

    From methods & data analysis class :D


  • #2


    The self-proclaimed genius Donald Trump claims that the Internet and gaming contributed to the recent mass shootings in America (Texas, Ohio, etc.), and not the angry and anti-racial political rhetoric that comes out of his mouth at rallies and in tweets. Comparatively speaking, if Internet access and gaming were significant factors to mass shootings, why do we not see many mass shootings in Ireland, or the EU or Japan? Or does Trump just make this #*&% up, conveniently ignoring the $31 million USD contributed to his 2016 presidential campaign by the National Rifle Association, the most ever in NRA history for a president campaign? Or that American civilians have easier access, and have more arms that any other nation on Earth?


  • #2


    Black Swan wrote: »
    Comparatively speaking, if Internet access and gaming were significant factors to mass shootings, why do we not see many mass shootings in Ireland, or the EU or Japan?
    Good question.


  • #2


    Fathom wrote: »
    Good question.
    Difference between politics and science.


  • #2


    Fathom wrote: »
    Yo mzungu. How do you differ between mixed methods & triangulation?
    Apologies for the delay :)
    Black Swan wrote: »
    One's methods, the other is data analysis.

    Aye. Triangulation measures things at a quantitative level which can highlight correlations etc. Whereas mixed methods are a more investigative theory building exercise. From my rapidly diminishing knowledge of stuff I happened across in college! :D


  • #2


    Black Swan wrote: »
    The self-proclaimed genius Donald Trump claims that the Internet and gaming contributed to the recent mass shootings in America (Texas, Ohio, etc.), and not the angry and anti-racial political rhetoric that comes out of his mouth at rallies and in tweets. Comparatively speaking, if Internet access and gaming were significant factors to mass shootings, why do we not see many mass shootings in Ireland, or the EU or Japan? Or does Trump just make this #*&% up, conveniently ignoring the $31 million USD contributed to his 2016 presidential campaign by the National Rifle Association, the most ever in NRA history for a president campaign? Or that American civilians have easier access, and have more arms that any other nation on Earth?

    I will veer into opinion here. But I think some the reasons why the US has such a large problem is down to a) its founding history b) post-cold war hangover c) woeful mental health care d) a society built on a falsehood (the American dream etc).

    A. The nation pretty much started out with a mass genocide. Robbing the land off native Americans. Ingrained into the societal DNA is a celebration of this fact. Look at Thanksgiving, it is still observed with a gusto even though it basically celebrates this fact.

    B. After decades of hyping up the "red enemy" through a whole plethora of mediums, you had a nation gripped by fear of the enemy from the end of WW2 up to the collapse of the USSR. This on a societal level is unhealthy becauase just like any other kind of message propagated out there wholesale....once the genie is out, it's hard to get it back in. Once the Soviet threat diminished (IMO even as far back as the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis), there were always other bogeymen that needed to be created to fill that void. A paranoid population always kept on it toes by fear of a far away unknown.

    C. Healthcare is expensive and out of reach for those that most need it. Add to this the celebration of violence within US society, I am not shocked that the first port of call for people with a grudge is to reach for a firearm. Look at how the public needs to get behind the military....always. Social welfare is also non-existent, probably because they might feel it would be communism to give people in need a dig out (this ties into B).

    D. The idea sold to everybody that if you work hard and make a go of it, you can have the nice white picket fences. What about Billy Bob in the trailer park in Alabama. Chances are no matter how hard he works he wont be able to afford a college education for his children. Success stories are lauded in the media, but that is little more than a carrot on a stick. The establishment always knew the odds were stacked against quite few, the thing is that now a lot more people realise that. This leads to anger and resentment.


    There are a lot more reasons than the above, but I don't have the time to get into them so I went with a few lesser discussed talking points for conversations sake. But the TLDR is that the fish rots from the top. A society that glorifies guns and violence, but yet supplies its population with deadly weaponry is always going to have problems like this. It's ingrained in the societal DNA.


  • #2


    mzungu wrote: »
    I will veer into opinion here. But I think some the reasons why the US has such a large problem is down to a) its founding history b) post-cold war hangover c) woeful mental health care d) a society built on a falsehood (the American dream etc).
    Cool summary.


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