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Internet Addiction?

  • 03-11-2017 4:49pm
    #1
    Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 47,101 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Black Swan


    Chih-Hung Ko, et al in Factors Predictive for Incidence and Remission of Internet Addiction in Young Adolescents: A Prospective Study, CyberPsychology & Behavior, Volume: 10 Issue 4: August 21, 2007, concluded: "High exploratory excitability, low reward dependence, low self-esteem, low family function, and online game playing predicted the emergency [emergence?] of the Internet addiction."

    Makes me wonder where the threshold exists between modern day Internet communications levels and "Internet Addiction?" Was this a line-in-the-sand established by clinical professionals with universal agreement, or a threshold that was so highly patient specific that it varied greatly between patients and normal Internet users?

    Comments?


«1345678

Comments

  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,290 Mod ✭✭✭✭ mzungu


    Black Swan wrote: »
    Chih-Hung Ko, et al in Factors Predictive for Incidence and Remission of Internet Addiction in Young Adolescents: A Prospective Study, CyberPsychology & Behavior, Volume: 10 Issue 4: August 21, 2007, concluded: "High exploratory excitability, low reward dependence, low self-esteem, low family function, and online game playing predicted the emergency [emergence?] of the Internet addiction."

    Makes me wonder where the threshold exists between modern day Internet communications levels and "Internet Addiction?" Was this a line-in-the-sand established by clinical professionals with universal agreement, or a threshold that was so highly patient specific that it varied greatly between patients and normal Internet users?

    Comments?
    This is a tricky one. I suppose when we hear the word "addiction" the first images that spring to mind are heroin addicts, or alcoholics and maybe further down that list would be gambling. Out of those, gambling is the only non-substance based addiction. The internet would fit into this bracket. However, is internet/gaming addiction a symptom of an underlying problem, or would it be the problem itself? Ie. If there was no Internet, would problematic gamers simply display addictive behaviour in other ways? There is no doubt that gaming and the like releases serotonin in the brain so there certainly is the potential there for addiction. I think it would be useful to probe the societal links further. For example, Cheng & Li (2014) found that Internet addiction varies among countries and is inversely related to quality of life.

    Cheng, C., & Li, A. Y. L. (2014). Internet addiction prevalence and quality of (real) life: a meta-analysis of 31 nations across seven world regions. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 17(12), 755-760.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    Internet addiction not included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5).


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 47,101 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Black Swan


    In a study of Korean teens it was concluded that 2 of 100 exhibited IAD (Internet Addiction Disorder). In briefly reviewing the study methodology I found it a bit problematic.

    Source:
    Mann Hyung Hur, Demographic, Habitual, and Socioeconomic Determinants of Internet Addiction Disorder: An Empirical Study of Korean Teenagers, CyberPsychology & Behavior, Volume: 9 Issue 5: October 11, 2006.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,290 Mod ✭✭✭✭ mzungu


    Regarding Online Gaming Addicts, a study from 2012 found that "Gray matter volume changes are present in online game addicts and they may be correlated with the occurrence and maintenance of OGA." (Weng et al. 2012).

    They compared the scans of online gaming addicts to people that were not big users. As with all research of this nature, there would want to be a lot more studies done, it could be that the scans were different due to other factors, possibly caused by addictive behaviour.

    Weng, C. B., Qian, R. B., Fu, X. M., Lin, B., Ji, X. B., Niu, C. S., & Wang, Y. H. (2012). A voxel-based morphometric analysis of brain gray matter in online game addicts. Zhonghua yi xue za zhi, 92(45), 3221-3223.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    Generation Z is demographic cohort after the Millennials. Cohort also referred to as "Internet generation." Would Internet addiction vary by generation? What might be addiction for Baby Boom, might be normal for Generation Z?


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  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 47,101 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Black Swan


    Fathom wrote: »
    Generation Z is demographic cohort after the Millennials. Cohort also referred to as "Internet generation." Would Internet addiction vary by generation? What might be addiction for Baby Boom, might be normal for Generation Z?

    Grand question.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    Defining Internet addiction. Problematic and alternative explanation. Could be myth in this case following Thomas Szasz?

    Ref: Szasz, T. S. (1974). The myth of mental illness: Foundations of a theory of personal conduct.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,290 Mod ✭✭✭✭ mzungu


    Fathom wrote: »
    Generation Z is demographic cohort after the Millennials. Cohort also referred to as "Internet generation." Would Internet addiction vary by generation? What might be addiction for Baby Boom, might be normal for Generation Z?

    I too, would be interested in the results of that. Considering screen time is now constant with smart phones and games are becoming ever more interactive (plus they are now part of VR) I think we may have to wait maybe a decade for something concrete (conclusions wise) but it is one to keep an eye out for. If addiction does not increase then we might be safely able to deduce that something else might cause it. Or if it is the technology itself, then that would be new ground. Interesting times ahead!


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    Tech assisted communications have become ubiquitous. Given this, defining Internet addition becomes problematic.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 47,101 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Black Swan


    Fathom wrote: »
    Generation Z is demographic cohort after the Millennials. Cohort also referred to as "Internet generation." Would Internet addiction vary by generation? What might be addiction for Baby Boom, might be normal for Generation Z?

    "In 2015, the market research firm Wildness conducted a study on 12 to 24 year olds in the U.S... The study revealed that 80 percent of Gen Z say finding themselves creatively is important. Over 25 percent post original video on a weekly basis, while 65 percent enjoy creating and sharing content on social media."

    If the Wildness study has merit, operationalisation of concept "Internet addiction" to variable measures may be problematic indeed, especially when comparing Baby Boomers against Generation Z samples. Boomers exhibiting Generation Z Internet usage may appear "addicted," while such usage by Generation Z may be normal and not addicted.


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  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    Internet addition? Baby Boom vs Gen X. Cliche: "Different strokes for different folks."


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 47,101 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Black Swan


    Fathom wrote: »
    Internet addition?
    Freudian slip?


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    Addition vs addiction. Twice.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 47,101 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Black Swan


    Have Smartphones Destroyed GenX? Jean M. Twenge suggested GenX'ers have become socially isolated from physical, face-to-face communications relying on Smartphones to compensate. Such social isolation was associated with increased levels of teen depression, considerably more so than Millennials.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    Black Swan wrote: »
    Have Smartphones Destroyed GenX? Jean M. Twenge suggested GenX'ers have become socially isolated from physical, face-to-face communications relying on Smartphones to compensate. Such social isolation was associated with increased levels of teen depression, considerably more so than Millennials.

    Different social construction of reality?


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 47,101 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Black Swan


    Jean M. Twenge (2017) in iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us (eBook: Simon and Schuster, Social Science). The title of this eBook says it all.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,290 Mod ✭✭✭✭ mzungu


    Black Swan wrote: »
    Jean M. Twenge (2017) in iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us (eBook: Simon and Schuster, Social Science). The title of this eBook says it all.

    That is one long book title! :D

    Sherry Turtle believes these chickens will come home to roost in the not so distant future. To be honest, I see where she is coming from, however there is a part of me that is saying "Hold up, hold up, there has been a moral panic about technology since pretty much every generation, is this just more of the same?". I tend to think it might have implications on a very small micro scale (to the point of being statistically insignificant) but in the macro scale everything will carry on with zero repercussions.

    Of course, I could be totally and utterly wrong....which is fairly likely!



    Turkle, S. (2017). Alone together: Why we expect more from technology and less from each other. Hachette UK.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    Fear of tech. In sci fi apocalyptic films. Unibomber hysterical fringe. Labor proclaiming AI and robotics jobs destruction (rather than upscaling workforce learning and transformation). Picture folks with togas, sandals, carrying signs saying "The end is near!" Or just another shift by generation aided by Internet?


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,290 Mod ✭✭✭✭ mzungu


    Fathom wrote: »
    Fear of tech. In sci fi apocalyptic films. Unibomber hysterical fringe. Labor proclaiming AI and robotics jobs destruction (rather than upscaling workforce learning and transformation). Picture folks with togas, sandals, carrying signs saying "The end is near!" Or just another shift by generation aided by Internet?

    Thing is though, there might not be enough employment to around. Of course, the other scenario as you described above will (hopefully) happen where it open newer avenues for employment.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    mzungu wrote: »
    Thing is though, there might not be enough employment to around. Of course, the other scenario as you described above will (hopefully) happen where it open newer avenues for employment.
    Old cliche: "Think local, act global." Rapid tech advancement focus (e.g., 3D printer advancement domestically, robotics, etc., eliminates overseas cheap, less skilled labor markets). Upgrade domestic labor education, learning & skills. Compete globally. Export tech, not labor. Extend profit cycles and management performance measures from quarterly and annual results to constantly revised year-plus horizons.


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,290 Mod ✭✭✭✭ mzungu


    Fathom wrote: »
    Old cliche: "Think local, act global." Rapid tech advancement focus (e.g., 3D printer advancement domestically, robotics, etc., eliminates overseas cheap, less skilled labor markets). Upgrade domestic labor education, learning & skills. Compete globally. Export tech, not labor. Extend profit cycles and management performance measures from quarterly and annual results to constantly revised year-plus horizons.
    Will everybody be equipped to participate in the new economy and for those not interested in the tech industry will there be alternate options? Finland have trialled a universal wage so that could be an option.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    mzungu wrote: »
    Will everybody be equipped to participate in the new economy and for those not interested in the tech industry will there be alternate options? Finland have trialled a universal wage so that could be an option.
    Doubtful America will follow suit any time soon. Major cultural and capitalistic model differences. Especially under the profits-not-people focus of the current Trump administration and Republican controlled congress. How does Internet addiction fit into this scheme? Distraction from real to virtual reality?


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,290 Mod ✭✭✭✭ mzungu


    Fathom wrote: »
    Doubtful America will follow suit any time soon. Major cultural and capitalistic model differences. Especially under the profits-not-people focus of the current Trump administration and Republican controlled congress.
    It certainly would require a complete shift of attitudes that is for sure.
    Fathom wrote: »
    How does Internet addiction fit into this scheme? Distraction from real to virtual reality?
    It could exacerbate the issue. Some studies have shown that those not in employment more likely to be addicted. Job losses due to AI could mean this figure goes higher.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    image?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftimedotcom.files.wordpress.com%2F2014%2F04%2Fmobile-has-become-addictive-flurry.png&w=700&q=85


  • Registered Users Posts: 32,134 ✭✭✭✭ Graces7


    Interesting thread. When I was left with no power and no communications for over 6 months, I wondered re addiction and withdrawal.

    As I am disabled and semi bedbound I rely heavily here for communications, entertainment.. BUT I have never gone for social media and my phone is a basic tesco E15 model

    It was inconvenient certainly but not as I had feared. We are adaptable. But then I am nearly 80 years old so not of the tech generation.

    I do use the internet several hours a day.

    Island Anchorhold..

    islandanchorhold.blogspot.com



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 47,101 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Black Swan


    Graces7 wrote: »
    It was inconvenient certainly but not as I had feared. We are adaptable.
    Thank you for your observations Graces7. In qualitative research we would consider your observations from the "emic" perspective, or through the eyes of the participant. More research needs to be done in regards to this thread topic.


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    Said before. What's defined an internet addiction in the past. May not hold for today. Must control for era. Demographic change.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,290 Mod ✭✭✭✭ mzungu


    Fathom wrote: »
    Said before. What's defined an internet addiction in the past. May not hold for today. Must control for era. Demographic change.

    Would it change that much, though? According to Nestler (2013) addiction is a brain disorder characterized by compulsive engagement in rewarding stimuli despite adverse consequences.

    If we go by the above, we could see the signs manifest themselves across a wide range of pursuits.

    Nestler EJ (2013). "Cellular basis of memory for addiction". Dialogues Clin. Neurosci. 15 (4): 431–443.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 47,101 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Black Swan


    Interesting conclusion by Nestler in the article mentioned above, but how addiction has been operationalised may still be a factor during changing cultural eras (e.g., Baby Boom, X-Gen, etc.). In the behavioural, social, and cultural sciences there still appears to be theoretical, conceptual, and qualitative aspects that inform such operationalisations to some point (even if such operationalisations were quantitative), consequently I would proceed with caution as to Nestler's conclusions. Suggesting a universal set for defining Internet addiction, ignoring era, may be problematic.


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  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional East Moderators, Regional Midlands Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators, Regional South East Moderators, Regional North East Moderators, Regional North West Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 8,386 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Fathom


    Problematic universal set. Agree.


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