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Turf

  • 08-05-2017 11:09am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 161 ✭✭ shrek008


    Anyone know of any type of hand held roller that would cut freshly cut hopper turf into sods about a foot long, usually do it with the spade but its a pain in the ass!! Makes it very easy to work with if sods are cut to uniform lengths


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 11,174 ✭✭✭✭ Muckit


    If the lad cutting the turf had it set up right on his hopper there would be no need! But I know what you mean!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,828 ✭✭✭ kollegeknight


    shrek008 wrote: »
    Anyone know of any type of hand held roller that would cut freshly cut hopper turf into sods about a foot long, usually do it with the spade but its a pain in the ass!! Makes it very easy to work with if sods are cut to uniform lengths


    It definately works, we used one for years. The turf has to be fresh enough though.

    It was like a big pizza slicer with the disk made from stainless steel about 450mm diameter.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,847 Shannon757


    It definately works, we used one for years. The turf has to be fresh enough though.

    It was like a big pizza slicer with the disk made from stainless steel about 450mm diameter.

    Have 2 of them here. Great yoke altogether for slicing through rows.


  • Registered Users Posts: 143 ✭✭ Hagimalone


    We made one yrs ago, when machine didn't have it installed, basically the bottoms of buckets, with threaded bar through centre, at a lenght apart that you want your sod, attach handle to centre or bar & of you go


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,005 ✭✭✭ Green farmer


    I use a stick with a old con saw blade / disk, nailed on to end. Basic but does job.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,446 ✭✭✭ SuperTortoise


    I do go back after it's cut (less than 24hrs) with a broom stick and a knife gunthered onto the end of it and pull it along the sod, once it forms a skin on top it'll break where it was marked.


  • Registered Users Posts: 251 ✭✭ buffalobilly


    I do go back after it's cut (less than 24hrs) with a broom stick and a knife gunthered onto the end of it and pull it along the sod, once it forms a skin on top it'll break where it was marked.

    thats the best job for it any wee mark and it will break
    a hell of a lot easier than using a big heavy con saw blade


  • Registered Users Posts: 161 ✭✭ shrek008


    So have i got this right? You guys reckon its a better job just to put a track on top of the turf rather than cutting it all the way through!


  • Registered Users Posts: 251 ✭✭ buffalobilly


    shrek008 wrote: »
    So have i got this right? You guys recrkon its a better job just to put a track on top of the turf rather than cutting it all the way through!
    Does the same job I will put up a photo of what I have here later


  • Registered Users Posts: 240 ✭✭ BANNERMAN98


    Does the same job I will put up a photo of what I have here later

    Have you the pic up? I'm looking for something like that


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  • Registered Users Posts: 707 ✭✭✭ Aravo


    shrek008 wrote:
    So have i got this right? You guys reckon its a better job just to put a track on top of the turf rather than cutting it all the way through!


    A light track will do the job. A prong of an old fork/grape works well. The sun/wind will do the rest. If it rained heavy straight after cutting it's likely the marks from hopper machine are gone. So remarking will assist otherwise you will end up with sods breaking all over the place. Not as easy to work with.


  • Registered Users Posts: 707 ✭✭✭ Aravo


    Serious money in cutting turf especially if a load of banks together, therefore little travelling. A couple of machines, no stress of travelling on roads, like with drawing silage.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,174 ✭✭✭✭ Muckit


    The future of silage is still fairly safe though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 509 ✭✭✭ wayoutwest


    I made this one out of an old circular saw disc (with teeth ground off), and a 2x1"baton. Makes quick, light work of scoring turf - reach out , chop down onto the furthest sod, and then draw towords you. I like to cut about half way through, rather than score, because it really encourages the sod to seperate where it's meant to.
    20170509_202311.jpg
    I'm still waiting for mine to be cut....last year I had it all in the shed on the Summer Solstice (june 21) and totally escaped the pisswet August. Was going to cut more than usual this year due to the high chance of cold winters ahead associated with the low sunspot activity that is happening now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 240 ✭✭ BANNERMAN98


    im hoping to have mine cut next week at the latest.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,661 ✭✭✭ lakill Farm


    Why doesn’t the hoppers cut the fresh turf every 14/16 inch ?

    Anywhere I see it cut and my own is always done as the machine cuts it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 707 ✭✭✭ Aravo


    Anywhere I see it cut and my own is always done as the machine cuts it.

    Why doesn’t the hoppers cut the fresh turf every 14/16 inch ?


    True, but if it rains heavy after it's cut the marks can be gone. Some machines mark better than others. I always check the marking afterwards so there are not areas unmarked as they are sure to break into loads of small bits.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,816 ✭✭✭ Bullocks


    Why doesn’t the hoppers cut the fresh turf every 14/16 inch ?

    Anywhere I see it cut and my own is always done as the machine cuts it.

    Some people prefer the rows uncut so when they are turning they can pull more than one sod over at a time


  • Registered Users Posts: 509 ✭✭✭ wayoutwest


    One year the machine scored them into short sods which made it a pain to handle, last year it was the correct length but too lightly marked in places + got a few showers after spreading. It's so quick to do with the disc that i think i will get the man to leave it unscored this year.

    If anyone is struggling with wet spreadground, I would recommend the pallet method - done it a few times now + works a treat. 10 sods to each 'tower' plus connecting sods ontop to stabilise against wind. Once the turf is on the pallet, it doesn't matter how much weather hits it.
    20170516_180625.jpg

    20170516_180714.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,462 ✭✭✭✭ Tell me how


    Aravo wrote:
    A light track will do the job. A prong of an old fork/grape works well. The sun/wind will do the rest. If it rained heavy straight after cutting it's likely the marks from hopper machine are gone. So remarking will assist otherwise you will end up with sods breaking all over the place. Not as easy to work with.

    I'd argue to slice right through or sods will break unevenly leaving lots of cerhawns.

    Even length sods will making turning and footing much easier. In my experience.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,661 ✭✭✭ lakill Farm


    Bullocks wrote: »
    Some people prefer the rows uncut so when they are turning they can pull more than one sod over at a time

    Right. We never turn any of it except the first sod and Last sod in a hopper. They tend to be formed poorly. If there is a wet spot on way out when drawing these are used


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,661 ✭✭✭ lakill Farm


    Bullocks wrote: »
    Some people prefer the rows uncut so when they are turning they can pull more than one sod over at a time

    Right. We never turn any of it except the first sod and Last sod in a hopper. They tend to be formed poorly. If there is a wet spot on way out when drawing these are used


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,816 ✭✭✭ Bullocks


    Right. We never turn any of it except the first sod and Last sod in a hopper. They tend to be formed poorly. If there is a wet spot on way out when drawing these are used

    Tradition here is turn , foot and refoot . Torture .
    Some lads will foot it straight up alright .


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,220 ✭✭✭ Hard Knocks


    Right. We never turn any of it except the first sod and Last sod in a hopper. They tend to be formed poorly. If there is a wet spot on way out when drawing these are used

    We never turned, just foot, refoot & bag
    Saw a neighbour cut, turn, turn & home.
    He started after we finished the 1st foot & had in the shed when we were refooting


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,462 ✭✭✭✭ Tell me how


    The way we do it, first turn is 180 degrees.

    Some years, we've turned again and not footed. Have never turned twice and footed but that's not to say it's wrong.

    Goes in a covered reek by bank for 8 months or so and then to shed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,793 ✭✭✭✭ Reggie.


    Bullocks wrote: »
    Tradition here is turn , foot and refoot . Torture .
    Some lads will foot it straight up alright .

    Foot once here then into the trailer


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,816 ✭✭✭ Bullocks


    Reggie. wrote: »
    Foot once here then into the trailer

    Do ye leave it season for a year in the shed before burning ? I think if it gets a good year seasoning its grand either way


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,793 ✭✭✭✭ Reggie.


    Bullocks wrote: »
    Do ye leave it season for a year in the shed before burning ? I think if it gets a good year seasoning its grand either way

    No burned straight away


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,816 ✭✭✭ Bullocks


    Reggie. wrote: »
    No burned straight away

    Ye are spoiled up there :D


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  • Registered Users Posts: 23,793 ✭✭✭✭ Reggie.


    Bullocks wrote: »
    Ye are spoiled up there :D

    Yeah it's stone turf. Very lucky


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