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Denis Villeneuve’s Dune

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  • Chalamet is best know for Call Me By Your Name, which I haven't seen yet, but I know him from Miss Stevens and Lady Bird. And he played young Casey Affleck in Interstellar.

    It's so long since I've read the book that I forgot that Atreides is a teenager at the beginning, so age wise he's probably right.

    Villeneuve suggested a while ago that the film might be split in two a la It, which I'm not crazy about but is probably an inevitable result of BR2049's box office.




  • LazyClouds wrote: »
    I think that's the one good thing that came from the Lynch Dune. The Harkonnen's really looked the part. And Brad Dourif's mentat was great.

    I loved Sting. Q6h6eoq.gif

    Ed Sheeran was born to play this guy




  • Timothee Chalamet in talks to play Paul Atreides.

    Not quite who I was expecting but extremely pleased to see this film is still happening.

    From seeing him in a few different productions, Chalamet is an excellent young actor




  • One small tidbit of info via Brian Herbert, the film will only cover half of the first book. Obviously that's going to leave a lot of potential for sequels, should the movie be successful - though I hope it can still stand on its own somehow.

    Been a long while since I read the book, so can't recall what might be a good endpoint that wasn't the actual finale.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/DuneAuthor/status/1021269122691182601




  • If it's the first half, my guess is that it'll be universe building.
    Probably no harm to set the scene.

    Cut point then probably...
    just after when they meet the Fremen
    or
    just before as the Harkonnens start their move


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  • Ugh, I assume we have BR2049's box office results to blame on the split. I'd have preferred a single 3+ hour movie, but as long as the second film definitely happens I won't mind so much. Hopefully the studio won't mess up the marketing.




  • Ugh, I assume we have BR2049's box office results to blame on the split. I'd have preferred a single 3+ hour movie, but as long as the second film definitely happens I won't mind so much. Hopefully the studio won't mess up the marketing.

    So apparently Villeneuve had previously made comments that he intended splitting the book into two films, I guess Herbert Jr.s comments confirm this. Suppose it's speculation how much of this decision is down to the box office of Blade Runner 2049 - Dune is a pretty dense novel




  • Ugh, I assume we have BR2049's box office results to blame on the split. .....

    I haven't been following this story. What results?

    I can't imagine Dune being a big hit as it's too left of centre for a mainstream audience. That said I would have thought the same thing of Lord of the Rings.




  • pixelburp wrote: »
    Been a long while since I read the book, so can't recall what might be a good endpoint that wasn't the actual finale.
    The book is in at least two distinct parts. I recall a break somewhere around the time Paul and Jessica escape the initial invasion.




  • I just hope the studio didn't presume 'woo! franchise!' when greenlighting an ostensible multi novel, highly regarded sci-fi series. It's not without reason Dune has only been adapted twice (with mixed results) in its 50 year history.


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  • Would have been awsome if Jodorowsky got his funding in 1976. They estimated his script would have resulted in a 14 hour movie! If it was today it would have resulted in a HBO mega series.
    Alejandro Jodorowsky, who (along with producer Michel Seydoux) proceeded to approach, among others, Virgin Records with the prog rock groups Tangerine Dream, Gong and Mike Oldfield before settling on Pink Floyd and Magma for some of the music; artists H. R. Giger, Chris Foss and Jean Giraud for set and character design; Dan O'Bannon for special effects; and Salvador Dalí, Orson Welles, Gloria Swanson, David Carradine, Mick Jagger, Udo Kier, Amanda Lear and others for the cast




  • In all likelihood Jodorowsky's 'Dune' would have been awful. But, it certainly makes for an interesting what if.


    Perhaps Vileneuve can make a good go of it. There's parts to Lynch's version that I love but, as a whole, it's a pretty poor film and the TV series with William Hurt was just boring.


    Dune is just one of those books I guess.




  • Jodorowsky's Dune always sounded so batsh*t crazy and IIRC he wanted to simulate the effect of a LSD trip. I mean why not I guess but college was a long time ago now and that idea just doesn't rev my engines. It'd be a waste of a good story.

    Whatll be interesting in this new adaptation will just how far the middle eastern, anti colonial elements will be taken. There are clear analogues at play in the book - heck the native rebellion is referred to as a Jihad - and they'd remain fairly incendiary today if the script stays true to the book. Can't see American conservatives loving it :D




  • Tony EH wrote: »
    In all likelihood Jodorowsky's 'Dune' would have been awful. But, it certainly makes for an interesting what if.


    Perhaps Vileneuve can make a good go of it. There's parts to Lynch's version that I love but, as a whole, it's a pretty poor film and the TV series with William Hurt was just boring.


    Dune is just one of those books I guess.

    I liked most of the lynch movie. Some distinctly odd bits though.

    Then again it's a odd series of books too.




  • pixelburp wrote: »
    Jodorowsky's Dune always sounded so batsh*t crazy and IIRC he wanted to simulate the effect of a LSD trip. I mean why not I guess but college was a long time ago now and that idea just doesn't rev my engines. It'd be a waste of a good story.

    Whatll be interesting in this new adaptation will just how far the middle eastern, anti colonial elements will be taken. There are clear analogues at play in the book - heck the native rebellion is referred to as a Jihad - and they'd remain fairly incendiary today if the script stays true to the book. Can't see American conservatives loving it :D

    Don't think Hollywood are too concerned with the faux-outrages of American conservatives and good enough too. If fools on the American right want to conflate a science fiction book/film's use of the word with modern day Jihadi's, let them go right ahead. It'll just make them look idiotic.

    Also, don't remember Lynch's version of the Fremen mentioned the word Jihad either?




  • beauf wrote: »
    I liked most of the lynch movie. Some distinctly odd bits though.

    A lot of it is good and very entertaining. Those parts are mostly contained to the beginning of the film though. The scene where the navigators arrive to meet Shaddam is fantastic in its weirdness.

    Later stuff with Paul leading the Fremen is pretty bad, both in a narrative sense and especially effects wise. His sister too is bloody terrible. Those overdubs for her are remarkable. The whole thing eventually becomes a mess really.

    I think Lynch's main problem is that Dune requires more than one film to really get the world across to the viewer. Especially one who's never read the book.

    However, one of my issues I'll have with this new adaptation will be that I can now only see a lot of the actors in Lynch's 'Dune' as their literary counterparts. Kyle MacLachlan is Paul Artreides in my mind. I only see Sting as Feyd and Kenneth McMillan as Baron Harkonnen. Sian Philips and Jose Ferrer will forever be the Reverend Mother and Emperor Shaddam.

    It'll take something to shift that.




  • Yeah, the narrative is a mess, especially near the end when it just goes off the deep end - complete with a book-breaking final moment.

    In terms of aesthetics and production design though, the film is just fantastically ... baroque, really. It's a shame Lynch disowned the production because I'd love to know how much of a hand he had, particularly in those visuals. The Harkonnen homeworld particularly gross and Lynch'ian (from what I recall of it), with an overall fanciful & dreamlike quality that makes it memorable, despite the structural problems.




  • Bautista has his fair share of VOD rubbish, but the man keeps popping up in interesting projects, working with interesting directors & seems to be someone wanting and willing to learn his trade. His grumbling, 'wounded bear' style was one of the bright spots in Hotel Artemis (the last thing I saw him in).

    I'm still waiting for the shoe to drop on this project though and it disappear into the ether again.




  • Really like Bautista. Apart from Spectre (not his fault) he's great in anything I've seen him in. Even Final Score.


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  • pixelburp wrote: »
    I'm still waiting for the shoe to drop on this project though and it disappear into the ether again.

    Same, which is why I get excited every time there's a casting announcement or other sign of progress.

    In other news, no Deakins. Greig Fraser (Rogue One) will be DP.




  • And arch villain Baron Harkonnen will be played by...

    Stellan Skarsgard.

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/stellan-skarsg-play-villain-legendarys-dune-1174870




  • Tony EH wrote: »
    However, one of my issues I'll have with this new adaptation will be that I can now only see a lot of the actors in Lynch's 'Dune' as their literary counterparts. Kyle MacLachlan is Paul Artreides in my mind. I only see Sting as Feyd and Kenneth McMillan as Baron Harkonnen. Sian Philips and Jose Ferrer will forever be the Reverend Mother and Emperor Shaddam.

    It'll take something to shift that.

    I agree with you on this point. Patrick Stewart will always be Gurney Halleck in my minds eye.
    And Francesca Annis...oh Franny ;)

    Dune is a book I re-read on a regular basis at least once a year.
    It just resonates with me on many levels.

    The Lynch adaptation has huge flaws, some of the casting is abysmal and the deviation from the actual novel ruins the flow of the story before we ever even discuss the visuals!

    The book is broken out into 3 parts and as such the likely arc by the Studio will be a trilogy and as they have optioned the whole Herbert estate, they may go with making the whole series.

    The casting announcements to date are really interesting and I'm excited to see how it all hangs together.

    My main worry for the adaptation is Kevin Anderson's involvement as a consultant.
    The trash churned out by Him and Herbert Jr really is awful and was a cynical attempt to cash in on the legacy of the original series.




  • banie01 wrote: »
    I agree with you on this point. Patrick Stewart will always be Gurney Halleck in my minds eye.
    And Francesca Annis...oh Franny ;)

    Dune is a book I re-read on a regular basis at least once a year.
    It just resonates with me on many levels.

    The Lynch adaptation has huge flaws, some of the casting is abysmal and the deviation from the actual novel ruins the flow of the story before we ever even discuss the visuals!

    Not a fan of the visuals? The FX haven't aged but I always thought its esoteric, fever-dream aesthetic at least gave the film a distinct flavour.




  • pixelburp wrote: »
    Not a fan of the visuals? The FX haven't aged but I always thought its esoteric, fever-dream aesthetic at least gave the film a distinct flavour.
    I think the set design and costuming is one of the high points of the movie, along with elements of the score. I remember reading about Herbert's reaction to the movie. He mentioned that they'd gone for a renaissance influences in the design to evoke the feudal nature of the society.




  • pixelburp wrote: »
    Not a fan of the visuals? The FX haven't aged but I always thought its esoteric, fever-dream aesthetic at least gave the film a distinct flavour.

    Well when I say visuals I should have been more specific in the SFX.
    Whilst they have aged terribly even in'84 they weren't great.
    In particular the Flying Baron, the desert flight sequences.
    That said the heart plugs were an interesting touch ;)

    The overall tone of the set and costume design was/is fantastic.
    Really evokes the feudal nature of the Duneiverse and the stark differences between houses.




  • mikhail wrote: »
    , along with elements of the score

    Brian Eno's work on the score is fantastic, what's a real testament to its quality is how often it has been used in other TV, movies and ads.




  • Ah right, gotcha. Yeah the FX themselves have aged really badly, wonder what happened there. Doubtless an impossible deadline. It's a shame David Lynch disowned the film, as a remaster and restoration of a longer directors cut could be an interesting prospect.




  • mikhail wrote: »
    I think the set design and costuming is one of the high points of the movie, along with elements of the score. I remember reading about Herbert's reaction to the movie. He mentioned that they'd gone for a renaissance influences in the design to evoke the feudal nature of the society.

    Its a bit quirky. But that would explain it.

    https://www.imdb.com/list/ls056100799/

    I like the movie, but it was an impossible task. The books are massive sagas. I can enjoy the movie for what it is, without too much looking back at the books. The worms, Freman, and the spice is well done. Some of the other stuff less well done.


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  • beauf wrote: »
    Its a bit quirky. But that would explain it.

    https://www.imdb.com/list/ls056100799/

    I like the movie, but it was an impossible task. The books are massive sagas. I can enjoy the movie for what it is, without too much looking back at the books. The worms, Freman, and the spice is well done. Some of the other stuff less well done.

    I had never heard of "Ice Pirates", I looked it up on YouTube. I now know why I have never heard of "Ice Pirates". Good to see stupid was in healthy supply back in '84 too...!


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