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General sheep thread

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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 740 ✭✭✭IH784man


    mcgiggles wrote: »
    Had a ewe do the same when we were dosing them. Nothing from her since but keeping watch on her. Anything with your one since? could it have been the start of the waterbag?

    She put a dead lamb out the following morning,sold her that evening


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,225 ✭✭✭charolais0153


    orm0nd wrote: »
    they're about 300

    there's a pic of ours over the "new beginnings" feb picture thread

    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=102607677&postcount=6

    most we ever had on it was 20, ok when they're small we put some of the bigger ones on buckets to make way for babies

    Only want one for ten to fifteen ish hopefully. Do they get used to easily? And is just your normal milk replacer like shine or lamlac


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,748 ✭✭✭ganmo


    Have a pair of ewes here with one eye each(both lost from crows) but one of them seems to be goin blind in the other eye :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,041 ✭✭✭Lambman


    ganmo wrote: »
    Have a pair of ewes here with one eye each(both lost from crows) but one of them seems to be goin blind in the other eye :(
    Did they go on there back ganmo or how'd they lose the eye in the first place? Heard overdosing can leave ewes blind sometimes permanently never seen it here all the same.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,748 ✭✭✭ganmo


    i cant rightly remember they must of been.
    it happened to both of them when they were young ewes and they're the oldest ewes so kinda expecting them to be on the downslope


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,041 ✭✭✭Lambman


    ganmo wrote: »
    i cant rightly remember they must of been.
    it happened to both of them when they were young ewes and they're the oldest ewes so kinda expecting them to be on the downslope
    Do u mind me asking what time off year you shear the ewes? Do u think that's the reason they went on there back not being sheared and in too good off order?


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,748 ✭✭✭ganmo


    Lambman wrote: »
    Do u mind me asking what time off year you shear the ewes? Do u think that's the reason they went on there back not being sheared and in too good off order?

    summer, june normally
    they're cheviots so their back wouldnt be hugely broad but they still manage it the odd time


  • Registered Users Posts: 516 ✭✭✭Ard_MC


    Lambman wrote: »
    Did they go on there back ganmo or how'd they lose the eye in the first place? Heard overdosing can leave ewes blind sometimes permanently never seen it here all the same.

    Over dosin with flukiver i heard is meant cause blindness. True or not i don't know!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,063 ✭✭✭tom_k


    Ard_MC wrote: »
    Over dosin with flukiver i heard is meant cause blindness. True or not i don't know!

    True. There have been studies done on the toxicity of closantel, the active ingredient. However, the quantities required for causing blindness seem to be on the high side, with younger sheep more affected. Certain breeds of course could be more susceptible than others.

    The quoted study took place in Uruguay of all places.
    Abstract

    An outbreak of Closantel intoxication in sheep in Uruguay is described. The outbreak occurred in a group of 1300 weaning lambs treated orally with a 10% solution of Closantel. One hundred forty eight lambs showed clinical signs of intoxication and 14 died. The clinical signs included mydriasis, nystagmus, and negative pupillary reflex, bilateral blindness, bump into objects, and lateral movement of the head. No macroscopic lesions were observed. The histological lesions of the retina were cytoplasmic vacuolization in ganglion cells and in cells of the inner and outer nuclear layers with different degrees of atrophy. Vacuolization and axonal degeneration were observed in the optic nerve, with multifocal areas of fibrosis and infiltration by lymphocytes and Gitter cells. To reproduce the intoxication, four sheep were given two, four and 10 times the therapeutic dose of Closantel (0.1g/kg of BW). Only the animals receiving 10 times the recommended dose showed clinical signs. The histological examination of the lesions in experimental sheep showed similar results to those described in the accidental outbreak, except for the absence of optic nerve fibrosis and inflammation, characterizing an acute phase. Axonal myelin sheaths loss, fibroblasts and collagen fibers were observed in the ultrastructural study of the optic nerve of accidental intoxicated animals. The optic nerve of experimentally intoxicated animals had vacuoles that separated the myelin sheaths of axons. To prevent outbreaks it is suggested to weigh the animals before Closantel administration to avoid errors in dose calculation.

    http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0100-736X2015000700599


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,001 ✭✭✭roosky


    feeding ewes hay in a ring feeder indoors and they are wasting a huge amount of it, any advice, i am working off farm so trying to avoid forking it daily


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  • Registered Users Posts: 357 ✭✭Oldira


    I am feeding about 40 in-lamb ewes outside ( I have the triplet bearing ones seperated/ My problem is that the sheep are feckers. They have nearly knocke me over a few times and some of them jump up to try and get at bag or bucket. Then they go beserk when I am trying to put meal in the troughs even with the result some gets spilt etc. Are my sheep just wild or is their any practical solution?.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,001 ✭✭✭roosky


    Oldira wrote: »
    I am feeding about 40 in-lamb ewes outside ( I have the triplet bearing ones seperated/ My problem is that the sheep are feckers. They have nearly knocke me over a few times and some of them jump up to try and get at bag or bucket. Then they go beserk when I am trying to put meal in the troughs even with the result some gets spilt etc. Are my sheep just wild or is their any practical solution?.

    very same trouble here, i ended up locking ewes away from troughs filling them and then letting the ewes out to feed


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,224 ✭✭✭mcgiggles


    we've found the exact same, ewes are wild for meal/ nuts! Ours are fed in the field with no place to lock them away haven't stopped to think how we could make it easier.. maybe fence around the troughs and fill them and open the gate into the "feeding area"?..


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,497 ✭✭✭rangler1


    mcgiggles wrote: »
    we've found the exact same, ewes are wild for meal/ nuts! Ours are fed in the field with no place to lock them away haven't stopped to think how we could make it easier.. maybe fence around the troughs and fill them and open the gate into the "feeding area"?..

    some people use ewe nuts and put them in little piles in the field, far enough apart to ensure that they're not standing on one pile when they are eating at another


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 53 ✭✭Dylan collins


    yes there i have a ewe with a bad limp she is due to be lambing in april. i clipped her feet last sunday and sprayed it with a anti foot root spray does anyone have any suggestions what to do with her


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,497 ✭✭✭rangler1


    yes there i have a ewe with a bad limp she is due to be lambing in april. i clipped her feet last sunday and sprayed it with a anti foot root spray does anyone have any suggestions what to do with her

    tetracycline injection if her foot is infected.....or it a hurt


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 JMF240


    rangler1 wrote: »
    yes there i have a ewe with a bad limp she is due to be lambing in april. i clipped her feet last sunday and sprayed it with a anti foot root spray does anyone have any suggestions what to do with her

    tetracycline injection if her foot is infected.....or it a hurt
    On a side note, which oxytet do you find most effective? Alamycin LA is mainly used here however I was at a talk recently and the vet recommended engemycin. I can't say I ever used it though.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 740 ✭✭✭IH784man


    We use alamaycin here seems to work most times


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,497 ✭✭✭rangler1


    JMF240 wrote: »
    On a side note, which oxytet do you find most effective? Alamycin LA is mainly used here however I was at a talk recently and the vet recommended engemycin. I can't say I ever used it though.

    Oxytetracycline is the active ingredient in both Alamycin and Engemycin,
    We're using Engemycin at the moment ourselves for lameness and after a hard lambing, Engemycin doesn't seem to hurt the ewes as much as Alamycin, it must be a hard injection to take


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 9,013 Mod ✭✭✭✭greysides


    The difference between oxytetracycline antibiotics is due to some of the other components in the mix. Cheaper versions don't cope with the irritancy as well as ones that use better components but which then cost more.
    I refuse to use some of the cheapest products as you're trying to cure an animal not add to its misery.

    The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress. Joseph Joubert

    The ultimate purpose of debate is not to produce consensus. It's to promote critical thinking.

    Adam Grant



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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,497 ✭✭✭rangler1


    greysides wrote: »
    The difference between oxytetracycline antibiotics is due to some of the other components in the mix. Cheaper versions don't cope with the irritancy as well as ones that use better components but which then cost more.
    I refuse to use some of the cheapest products as you're trying to cure an animal not add to its misery.

    My thoughts too, used to be concerned as to what i was doing to the ewe , she'd definitely be in pain walking off after injecting and then started using engemycin.....much easier on them, but dearer


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 740 ✭✭✭IH784man


    If alamaycin is €8 a bottle how much is engemycin


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,497 ✭✭✭rangler1


    IH784man wrote: »
    If alamaycin is €8 a bottle how much is engemycin

    Is that LA 200, sounds a good price, enge is probably double that


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,890 ✭✭✭Bullocks


    Would ye be able to tell me a couple of measurements for a sheep feeding gate ?
    I want to replace a cattle feed barrier just for when theyre lambing .
    I would be thankful for the height of the bottom timber and height over that , that they feed out through
    Thanks in advance


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,497 ✭✭✭rangler1


    Bullocks wrote: »
    Would ye be able to tell me a couple of measurements for a sheep feeding gate ?
    I want to replace a cattle feed barrier just for when theyre lambing .
    I would be thankful for the height of the bottom timber and height over that , that they feed out through
    Thanks in advance

    I have Cormac barriers
    The bottom board is 12 inches and the gap is 11 inches for adult ewes and 9 inches for ewe lambs. You need a trough for ewe lambs as they cant reach the ground over the 12 inch board


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,321 ✭✭✭razor8


    10" board is a better job imo, even ewes can't reach out very far over a 12" board for eating meal or silage


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,497 ✭✭✭rangler1


    razor8 wrote: »
    10" board is a better job imo, even ewes can't reach out very far over a 12" board for eating meal or silage

    I used to think that myself and told that to a neighbour that came to measure mine one day, He told me after he had to rise it to 12in ....so it's hard to know, I suppose it's easier to rise it than lower it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,599 ✭✭✭White Clover


    Lads, bought a few sheep 2 weeks ago. It's about 20 years since we last had em. Anyway, housed them today onto straw and they're scratching like mad, what's the issue here?
    Advice appreciated.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,321 ✭✭✭razor8


    rangler1 wrote: »
    I used to think that myself and told that to a neighbour that came to measure mine one day, He told me after he had to rise it to 12in ....so it's hard to know, I suppose it's easier to rise it than lower it.

    Why did he say 10" was too low?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,497 ✭✭✭rangler1


    razor8 wrote: »
    Why did he say 10" was too low?

    Top bar was too low and when he lifted the top bar, they started squeezing out between them, 12 inches is very high, but cormac makes a lot of barriers....rise the feeding passage I suppose is the answer


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