Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie

Adult ADHD Advice

Options
  • 15-06-2016 5:33pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    This thread for adults who think they might have ADHD, want advice about what it means to be an adult with this neurological disorder and how to access help in Ireland to reach a diagnosis and what you are entitled to.

    If you are here to spout ignorant nonsense about it being a pretend condition you are not welcome.
    This thread is specifically for people looking for support.

    I am a recently diagnosed adult and I am willing and able to anwer questions, to the best of my abilty, and from my own experience about managing ADHD and how to deal with a new diagnosis.

    I can also answer questions about tips and techniques.
    Tagged:


«13456728

Comments

  • Moderators, Computer Games Moderators Posts: 3,182 Mod ✭✭✭✭Dr Bob


    Hi
    This is something thats really close to me as I have it , and Adult ADHD support is thin on the ground.
    It might be worth getting the thread moved by a mod to somewhere more suitable though (as this forum is move about pyschology as a subject ) possibly Long term ilness?Just ..not after hours!
    Also most forums have a very strict 'no medical advice' rule , so just to clarify no medical advice or pharmacuetical advice , maybe just coping tips.
    sorry if I'm back seat modding here , but I dont want to see this shut down , (I've seen one or two of these kind of threads killed before)


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Ok thanks.
    Been on forums for years so I am aware of the rules regarding dangerous advice so will be steering well clear of that. cheers for the clarity.

    Adult support is non-existent in Ireland unfortunately so I would really like this thread to be helpful and in the right place.

    Requested that it be moved to long term illness :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,034 ✭✭✭goz83


    Interesting to see this thread, as I wonder if I have a touch of adhd. My 5 year old sone was just diagnosed a couple of days ago and was also diagnosed with asbergers. His behaviour is very similar to mine when I was his age. I really didn't want to be bold, but I often got into trouble without realising there would be consequences. I would be seen to smile and grin when I was in trouble, but I certainly didn't find it funny.....a trait my son has which caused confusion to others.

    I became intersted in girls at a young age, I was about 9 and that's when I started to control my behaviour. I have always had urges to do and say immature things, which bothers me alot, because I consider myself to be an intelligent person, but it's like I have this immature person fighting for control of my body, who gets out in little doses. Its the side of me that prefer AH on boards :a

    I have always had a sensitivity to light and I squint on brighter days and get tension headache if its sunny out and I dont have my sunglasses. I hate loud sounds and raised voices, unless I am in control of those sounds.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Hi goz83
    Are you aware that a lot of adults find out they have ADHD after they have been through the diagnosis process with their children?

    Do you feel you are learning a lot about yourself through your childs diagnosis? This is really common too.
    Without wanting to delve into too personal a question but answer as much as you like, do your "quirks" and "differences" have a negative
    impact on your day to day life?

    Do you feel you would benefit from a diagnosis or do you think some adult geared daily management tools would help you?
    A doctor is much more likely to take you seriously when a child is diagnosed as it is hereditary.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,034 ✭✭✭goz83


    cannex wrote: »
    Hi goz83
    Are you aware that a lot of adults find out they have ADHD after they have been through the diagnosis process with their children?

    Do you feel you are learning a lot about yourself through your childs diagnosis? This is really common too.
    Without wanting to delve into too personal a question but answer as much as you like, do your "quirks" and "differences" have a negative
    impact on your day to day life?

    Do you feel you would benefit from a diagnosis or do you think some adult geared daily management tools would help you?
    A doctor is much more likely to take you seriously when a child is diagnosed as it is hereditary.

    I can imagine that a lot of adults get diagnosed while getting their children diagnosed, but I was previously not fully aware of the hereditary nature of ADHD.

    As he was only diagnosed a few days ago, I haven't really analysed myself in any detail with regards to the diagnosis, but my wife has learned a little about me as a result of it. I am not sure how a diagnosis would help me tbh. You see, nothing has changed and I don't think I need to change anything as such, but as per my original post, some of the "quirks" on the immature side bother me, but some of that defines me too. I sometimes feel compelled to make others see things as I see them, which is very often a very broken down version of things. So, I am good at explaining most things in a simple way.

    I suppose I have learned to live with myself and get on with it. I have a great family...a bunch of kids and I work for myself, which gives me some flexibility. I call myself "unemployable" because while I have no real issues with authority...I just hate seeing things not being done as I see they should be done. When I was employed and asked to do something where I could see a better way of doing it, I can only describe the feeling like being to told to wear your shoes on the wrong feet and then put your socks on over them :P

    I have watched the Big Bang Theory and the Sheldon character reminds me of me, but not quite nearly as obsessive as that and I don't have a Phd. I hope that helps.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,196 ✭✭✭Shint0


    I just want to acknowledge this thread. I have a lot to say on this topic which I hope to come back to but glad to see that people are raising the issue and open to discussion.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    The unemployable thing is funny because being self employed is a lot better for people with ADHD. I consider myself unemployable too and all I work towards is being self employed.

    The main criteria of being diagnosed as an adult is that there should be a detrimental effect on many aspects of life: work, relationships, finances, college, more likely to be in a car crash. Trouble maintaining friendships, depression, chaos in home and work and trouble maintaining employment.

    If you dont have major problems across all these aspects of life then there really is no need to get a diagnosis.

    The sensory issues with noises that you have no control over are quite common on the ASD/aspergers diagnosis.
    But it seems to me that you are getting along just fine :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,034 ✭✭✭goz83


    I've been in no less than 3 car accidents that were not my fault and I was injured. Ive also had a couple where i was to blame but thankfully they were all crawling speed and no injury. The other stuff...let me see;

    Work: As I said, not really the employee type.

    Friendshios/Relationships: Tough to call. I can be a recluse at times, which doesn't suit someone in my situation (married with children). I find it hard to let go if someone has wronged me, even though intellectually, I know it's better to forgive and forget. I can feel awkward around people on a personal level, yet when it comes to my work, you would never know this. I'm a decent sales person and im a hypnotist who spends alot of time counselling people.

    Finances: I never feel like there is enough and I am not as bad as I was, but I have been an awful waster of money. Shiney things.

    College: didn't quite get there. No leaving cert. Hated school to the point where I was a genius at finding ways not to go. I did a diploma in clinical hypnotherapy, but it's not the same thing. Oddly enough, my OH is a teacher.

    Chaos: i like watching stuff burn. I'm not an arsonist, or anything, but i've always been fascinated with fire consuming things. I used to light fires alot as a kid (safely) and i still like to watch a fire, even if it's just watching the stove doing its thing.

    Depression: wasn't something I noticed until about a year and a half ago, but I was in a lot of physicsl pain for several months and it wore me down. The lows still hit me unexpectedly since then. I distract myself as best I can, often using boards as an escape if i'm honest.

    Employment: the only job i had more than a year was a pizza delivery job, unless you count door to door sales, which i did for longer. Otherwise, it would be a couple of months here and there. Ive had my own practice for 8 years and have been running a different company the past year.

    All in all, yeah, i'm doing fine. It's interesting now that I can somewhat explain some of my behaviour, past and present. The gift is that I can understand my son, when others cannot.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    goz83 wrote: »
    The gift is that I can understand my son, when others cannot.

    Perfect :)

    If any questions or thoughts come up relating to living with ADHD then feel free pop in and ask away.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,196 ✭✭✭Shint0


    goz83 wrote: »
    Chaos: i like watching stuff burn. I'm not an arsonist, or anything, but i've always been fascinated with fire consuming things. I used to light fires alot as a kid (safely) and i still like to watch a fire, even if it's just watching the stove doing its thing.
    To me ADHD is chaos. It's not just having to think about an example of chaos. Chaos is the essence of ADHD. It is the defining effect. The OP hits the nail on the head. ADHD permeates every single aspect of life in terms of functioning.

    My diagnosis is completely up in the air. I had an absolutely horrible negative experience with certain doctors around the assessment process in a well known private mental health service provider which I might elaborate more on in another post.

    There is so much ignorance and lack of awareness around Adult ADHD here. Not just among the general public but among the medical profession and actual doctors within the mental health service.

    There is a general perception that people with ADHD can't pay attention. That's absolute hogwash. ADHD is nothing to do with the lack of ability to pay attention. It involves difficulty in regulating attention which is a completely different issue.

    I had been posting in the ongoing thread here on depression/anxiety and some of my experience around severe depression in the past which I realised in more recent years was essentially linked to my difficulties with ADHD type symptoms and behaviour, and huge difficulties in trying to understand why my brain works as it does.

    I had searched for threads on here before but as someone else mentioned they often get shut down so I was always reluctant to start one and the depression/anxiety thread doesn't quite reflect a lot of my struggles and always felt limited in what I could post. It is an excellent thread but for me my issues extend beyond that and are more ADHD related.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Yip, chaos is the the word that pretty much summed it up for me.
    No matter how hard I tried I could never remove myself from the chaos.

    Its a crying shame that you had such a terrible experience from the ignorance of doctors and specialists. I'm curious, how long ago was that and do you think things might be a little bit better if you were to try again?

    ITs interesting that at the age of 19 I went to the mental helth service as I was dealing with depression and one of the doctors I encountered there met me again a few weeks ago, he said: have I met you before? and his face popped into my mind and I said yes I saw you 15 years ago with depression. Since then he had become an expert in ADHD in children and spent over an hour with me at my appointment and had a student psychologist in tow as we went through all my symptoms and experiences and difficulties, he was nodding and explaining to the student the reasons and background to my symptoms.

    It was a very positive experience to have the dots joined together after all these years and to actually meet the same doctor I met when I was 19.

    So for me the debilitating anxiety and subsequent depression that come about dealing with undiagnosed ADD was finally understood as a symptom of ADD and not a condition in itself, although it can be.

    Have you thought about trying to get a diagnosis again?
    If you do want to think about it again just remember that in the last 6-7 years the understanding has changed and I can help you with tips on standing up for yourself to get the treatment you deserve.

    The difference in being diagnosed and getting the help and aknowledgement of your difficulties really helps.

    I hear ya :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,196 ✭✭✭Shint0


    It was actually much more recent than that, Cannex, much more recently, just to answer that part of your question but I'll come back to the thread again to post more on my thoughts and experience around the whole issue as well as my experience of the assessment process.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,196 ✭✭✭Shint0


    I wanted to come back to this thread but it seems there might only be a couple of us interested in the topic. It might have the potential to end up becoming more like a chat rather than a discussion between a few interested individuals which can be frowned upon by Boards but just to bump the thread anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Quite possibly but my idea behind posting this thread was so anybody, who like me searched Adult ADHD on this board and only came across a thread that descended into ill-informed illness bashing.

    So hopefully if anyone in Ireland decides to search Adult ADHD again they will see this thread and not feel threatened or ashamed.

    They might/will be able to ask about it and know there will be an informed response.

    No worries if the thread gets lower on the recent threads spot. I'm just thinking long-term if someone wants advice I will do my best to answer and anyone else who has advice or wants to tell their experiences good and bad.

    Post away though about your experiences, I actually wrote a post yesterday about the kind of things I find the most difficult but I forgot to press the reply button :)

    Will get back to that post.

    Didnt realise boards would frown upon it though :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,196 ✭✭✭Shint0


    cannex wrote: »
    Quite possibly but my idea behind posting this thread was so anybody, who like me searched Adult ADHD on this board and only came across a thread that descended into ill-informed illness bashing.

    So hopefully if anyone in Ireland decides to search Adult ADHD again they will see this thread and not feel threatened or ashamed.

    They might/will be able to ask about it and know there will be an informed response.
    (
    Exactly. That's always the best motivation for starting a thread.
    Regardless if it does appear to be a chat rather than a discussion (how do you distinguish between both?) people reading the thread and the general public might find some points of information useful even if they are not able to contribute.

    Indeed one of the reasons I find it even hard to write on this thread is because I have so much to say on this topic. Once I get started I can ramble on and on with thoughts going all over the place once I'm on a roll and it might just look like a wall of text to others going off in tangents without paragraphs. Ya get the point? ;)

    That indeed is a reflection of an ADHD-type brain and would be a defining hallmark. Of course not everybody who rambles has ADHD but if you start to tick enough boxes.....

    Cannex you mentioned your assessment process. I'm curious to know more about that. Did you have a formal assessment or was it more conversational style during the course of a consultation? I have a diagnosis and I don't have a diagnosis.

    I might not always reply straight away but it would be good to try to keep the thread flowing and dip in and out of it. Of course there is always the danger in this type of instance that in order to share personal experiences for the benefit of others you might make yourself personally identifiable as Ireland's such a small country. Feck that. Anyone who already knows me knows I always play out in left field anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Shint0 wrote: »
    Cannex you mentioned your assessment process. I'm curious to know more about that. Did you have a formal assessment or was it more conversational style during the course of a consultation? I have a diagnosis and I don't have a diagnosis.

    I might not always reply straight away but it would be good to try to keep the thread flowing and dip in and out of it. Of course there is always the danger in this type of instance that in order to share personal experiences for the benefit of others you might make yourself personally identifiable as Ireland's such a small country. Feck that. Anyone who already knows me knows I always play out in left field anyway.

    Well, the diagnosis process needs to be preceeded by saying that I was tested in 2007 for a learning disability and I was diagnosed with dyscalculia - I wonder do people think this is fake too :)
    After that diagnosis I tried to study and moved away from Ireland.
    It really stood out how unable I was to look after the basics like paying bills, holding down a job, making friends and looking after myself in general.

    Moved back to Ireland and after another few months of thinking something was up, why couldnt I get on in life like my peers, why couldnt I pay a bill on time (gas was cut in the middle of winter) etc etc.

    I always thought I might have ADHD but any time I did some research it described 9 year old boys hopping off walls!

    Anyway I decided to search for adult ADHD and after doing non stop research for 3 months, including how to get tested in Ireland I found the only reasonable way to get tested was to go privately.

    I booked an appointment with a psychiatrist who specialises in ADHD.
    Before I went to my appointment I had decided to write down all the difficulties I experience on a daily basis and my life history.

    By the time my appointment came around I had written boths sides of 5 foolscap pages, 10 pages!
    I also searched for ADHD screening tests online, and not the quick 10 question ones that are like pop quizes - no the one I printed out and filled in was a Canadian form for psychiatrists (very detailed) that asked approx 50 questions that were questions to rule out or in disorders like ADHD, bi-polar, schizophrenia and OCD and probably others too.
    I filled one out related to my life now in blue pen and marked the ones that affected me as a child and teenager in red pen.

    As an adult it is recommended that you bring someone to the appointment who knows you well or preferably all your life. I brough my mum. I had no school reports or anything like that.

    The consultant spoke to my mum in private first for half and hour. He read all the foolscap pages I had written, he read the forms, he also read the psychoeducational report I got from the dyscalcualia diagnosis. The dyscalculia report also included all the other descriptions and results from all the IQ and cognition tests that were done.

    I spoke with the consultant for another 40 mins while he asked me questions and ticked boxes while recording the whole appointment.

    He said I most likely have ADD and had Oppositional Defiance Disorder as a child.

    I was a textbook case of ADD.

    I got a diagnosis letter sent to me as an attachment in an email and it was posted to me too. This took about 3 weeks I think.

    He recommended meds that I cant talk about here, he recommended occupational therapy and advised that I access certain services.
    I was refered previously to the mental health department in the HSE so I waited for my first appointment.

    Because I had gotten a private diagnosis the process of getting treatment went smoothly after that although there are periods of waiting between 6 and 10 months for different services.
    During that time I have to just wait and help myself. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 91 ✭✭nelbot


    cannex wrote: »
    The unemployable thing is funny because being self employed is a lot better for people with ADHD. I consider myself unemployable too and all I work towards is being self employed.

    The main criteria of being diagnosed as an adult is that there should be a detrimental effect on many aspects of life: work, relationships, finances, college, more likely to be in a car crash. Trouble maintaining friendships, depression, chaos in home and work and trouble maintaining employment.

    If you dont have major problems across all these aspects of life then there really is no need to get a diagnosis.

    The sensory issues with noises that you have no control over are quite common on the ASD/aspergers diagnosis.
    But it seems to me that you are getting along just fine :)

    I have ADHD, I got diagnosed 6 years ago. Before diagnosis and treatment I never finished a course, couldn't keep a job longer than a few months and jumped from one relationship to another. I had no concept of building for the future. Since I began treatment I have done my leaving cert, gained a degree, am engaged and have seen a job through. Even being aware of the condition has helped me enormously. Before diagnosis I was one of those stupid people who regarded the condition as a fabrication.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    nelbot wrote: »
    I have ADHD, I got diagnosed 6 years ago. Before diagnosis and treatment I never finished a course, couldn't keep a job longer than a few months and jumped from one relationship to another. I had no concept of building for the future. Since I began treatment I have done my leaving cert, gained a degree, am engaged and have seen a job through. Even being aware of the condition has helped me enormously. Before diagnosis I was one of those stupid people who regarded the condition as a fabrication.

    It can feel very hopeless and baffling to wonder why all these things cant be controlled and then the diagnosis can be a relief and set up another sense of hopelessness.........until I could see an inkling of progress in learning skills to manage my life through occupational therapy.

    A long way off yet but it really made me happy to read your post. WOW!!
    Just shows you what awareness and getting treatment can do to turn around the life of a person with ADHD who is getting the right help.

    So reassuring to read. Because we are not stupid for sure, just need aknowledgement and treatment.


  • Registered Users Posts: 91 ✭✭nelbot


    cannex wrote: »
    It can feel very hopeless and baffling to wonder why all these things cant be controlled and then the diagnosis can be a relief and set up another sense of hopelessness.........until I could see an inkling of progress in learning skills to manage my life through occupational therapy.

    A long way off yet but it really made me happy to read your post. WOW!!
    Just shows you what awareness and getting treatment can do to turn around the life of a person with ADHD who is getting the right help.

    So reassuring to read. Because we are not stupid for sure, just need aknowledgement and treatment.

    I would just have this sudden loss of priority. It could happen anytime, I could be doing really well and just suddenly just walk, I couldn't explain it to myself, this would be followed by a period of self-deprecation for failing again. The stability didn't come immediately after treatment started, it took time and practice, and a lot of research into the condition. I found some very interesting facts which I can't discuss here as it might fall under medical advice. Let me just say for the first two years I was angry at what I viewed as a waste of a lot of years and potential, but as this condition was not recognised when I was a child, there was no one to blame. Once I got past that, and I became more used to managing the condition, the time since has been full of optimism.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    nelbot wrote: »
    I would just have this sudden loss of priority. It could happen anytime, I could be doing really well and just suddenly just walk, I couldn't explain it to myself, this would be followed by a period of self-deprecation for failing again.

    My lifes story...


    Its only been a year since diagnosis and started treatment in November 2015.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 91 ✭✭nelbot


    cannex wrote: »
    My lifes story...


    Its only been a year and started treatment in November 2015.

    I can't give you medical advise, but I strongly advise regular cardio exercise such as jogging, swimming or cycling. Besides from the obvious health benefits, over a period of time these activities are a major help in establishing routine.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,063 ✭✭✭Greenmachine


    @Cannex

    Just wanted to confirm you got your diagnosis in Ireland and that you were an Adult at the time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    @Cannex

    Just wanted to confirm you got your diagnosis in Ireland and that you were an Adult at the time.

    Yes diagnosed in Ireland by a private consultant psychologist at the age of 35.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    nelbot wrote: »
    I can't give you medical advise, but I strongly advise regular cardio exercise such as jogging, swimming or cycling. Besides from the obvious health benefits, over a period of time these activities are a major help in establishing routine.


    Getting a routine is my sole focus right now lol starting with the basics.


  • Registered Users Posts: 91 ✭✭nelbot


    cannex wrote: »
    Getting a routine is my sole focus right now lol starting with the basics.

    Vitiman b complex, fish oils and regular cardio all go a long way to regulating endorphin release. Irregular endorphin release is the problem.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Eat lots of oily fish and cook everything from scratch. Must look into the vitamin B thing :)

    In the interest of clarity and being a pinickity fuddy duddy I just wanted to clarify the endorphin and other neurotransmitter lingo. Just so anyone reading this gets as much info as possible.

    Dopamine, endorphin, serotonin and oxytocin are all neurotransmitters that have varying functions in the brain but are interconnected.


    Dopamine is more to do with regulating behaviour, repeating behaviours and regulating attention - all things it is proven that the ADHD brain is mis-firing or not transmitting properly.
    Endorphin - the feel good neurotransmitter is released with exercise, in an accident so you dont feel pain - but in getting excercise it helps to regulate these neurotransmitters and help them help each other. Endorphin also regulate sleep cycles - something the ADHD brain struggles to regulate therefore causing more routine issues - not being able to go to bed at the right time and not being able to wake up on time.

    The most recent agreement is that the ADHD brain has problems regulating and transmitting dopamine - which is responsible for a lot of things people take for granted like
    planning ahead, choosing what to focus on, what to tune in and out in a busy cafe for example. Lots more but this gives an idea.
    The part of the brain that deals with daily tasks and future planning etc is called the executive function. Daily choices, planning, estimating how long it takes to do something, regulating frustration/emotions to not act them out. All executive function.

    We are treated with a medication that regulates the firing of the neurotransmitter dopamine and and a hormone called norepinephrine which is responsible for the flight or fight response and attention.


  • Registered Users Posts: 91 ✭✭nelbot


    cannex wrote: »
    Eat lots of oily fish and cook everything from scratch. Must look into the vitamin B thing :)

    In the interest of clarity and being a pinickity fuddy duddy I just wanted to clarify the endorphin and other neurotransmitter lingo. Just so anyone reading this gets as much info as possible.

    Dopamine, endorphin, serotonin and oxytocin are all neurotransmitters that have varying functions in the brain but are interconnected.


    Dopamine is more to do with regulating behaviour, repeating behaviours and regulating attention - all things it is proven that the ADHD brain is mis-firing or not transmitting properly.
    Endorphin - the feel good neurotransmitter is released with exercise, in an accident so you dont feel pain - but in getting excercise it helps to regulate these neurotransmitters and help them help each other. Endorphin also regulate sleep cycles - something the ADHD brain struggles to regulate therefore causing more routine issues - not being able to go to bed at the right time and not being able to wake up on time.

    The most recent agreement is that the ADHD brain has problems regulating and transmitting dopamine - which is responsible for a lot of things people take for granted like
    planning ahead, choosing what to focus on, what to tune in and out in a busy cafe for example. Lots more but this gives an idea.
    The part of the brain that deals with daily tasks and future planning etc is call the executive function. Daily choices, planning, estimating how long it takes to do something, regulating frustration/emotions to not act them out. All executive function.

    We are treated with a medication that regulates the firing of the neurotransmitter dopamine and and a hormone called norepinephrine which is responsible for the flight or fight response.

    Outside hormones, most biological messengers are proteins, Vitamin b6 is the 'glue' for building proteins.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,196 ✭✭✭Shint0


    nelbot wrote: »
    Let me just say for the first two years I was angry at what I viewed as a waste of a lot of years and potential.
    I could sing that from the rooftops.

    This is so common among adults with ADHD. All the time lost and the limitations on your potential despite your own awareness of your own level of intelligence. That's what causes so much frustration. The gap between your own level of intelligence and being able to apply it, and that gap is huge for people with ADHD as with other types of specific learning disabilities. That frustration can lead to anger issues which I have seen in one of my male siblings who clearly has the condition.

    I, myself, would be affected to a degree in that way where it's completely out of character and not a reflection of my own personality and struggled to understand where it would come from out of nowhere but I have learned to keep a lid on it somewhat.

    Cannex also referred to anger issues that go with it and anger issues in women are viewed very differently by society and more socially unacepptable than it is for boys and men.

    Just to get back to the point of time management and wasted time in the broader sense. Even before I considered myself as having ADHD I always felt I was operating on a different channel. You are always playing catch up. The analogy I have always used is everybody else is watching RTE 1 or SKY but you're always watching RTE +1 or SKY+1.

    There's a reason behind all that which has only been minimally researched. There was one study ( and yes I've done all the endless research as well Cannex :D) which compared 'normal' 'neurotypical' brains to the ADHD brain. It was found that the 'normal neurotypical' brain operates at a particular frequency but the ADHD brain is one beat out which makes a huge amount of sense around the vast difficulties with time management and validated my own theory as well as issues around circadian rhythms which I have always had huge issues with.

    When I went to research that theory it seems someone in NUIM is currently investigating that angle. So many of my own hunches are now starting to add up the more I delved into it. Still so much more in terms of research needs to be done.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,063 ✭✭✭Greenmachine


    @Cannex

    Just wanted to confirm you got your diagnosis in Ireland and that you were an Adult at the time.

    Was not aware there were any medicines approved for use in adults in this country for adhd.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,196 ✭✭✭Shint0


    Cannex it seems we are both very much on the same page here and it's a hugely vast complex issue well beyond the stereotypical image that it's just five year old boys bouncing around a classroom.

    So much of my situation would mirror your situation Cannex but I want to come back to your point about dyscalculia which I won't get into now as I type on my mobile so is difficult to elaborate and expand when there are so many cross issues but it was a pivotal issue in one of my assessments. I have had two.

    I picked up on your point that people seem to think it's a fake issue as well. I'm inferring from that you seem to have had negative reaction to that diagnosis as well as ADHD beyond just the usual societal view of ADHD being a fake diagnosis. Again very hard typing on my mobile and my brain works faster than my fingers.


Advertisement