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Adult ADHD Advice

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  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    This article is excellent and describes to a T how the medication affects me.

    "The medicine does not change who he is, it just clears away the excess noise in his mind and allows him access to his thoughts. It lets him be who he was meant to be. "


    http://community.today.com/parentingteam/post/my-child-is-easier-to-like-when-hes-medicated?cid=sm_fbn_pt


  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭Feu


    Saw this interesting article on broadly, re: women with ADD/ADHD

    https://broadly.vice.com/en_us/article/adhd-women-better-together-festival


  • Registered Users Posts: 30 Greengearz


    Assessment with Michael Fitzgerald is in two days time!
    Still have to print off the CADDRA self assessment stuff in the morning as the printer in college wouldn't work today!
    Any last minute tips? :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Hey best of luck tomorrow. Fitzgerald is a lovely man and he will speak into a dictaphone most of the time. Just remember to be brutally honest about the struggles you have endured due to being undiagnosed, as in, you need to talk about the things that you keep hidden.
    Thats all I can i say really.

    Let us know how you get on.
    :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 30 Greengearz


    So he confirmed my suspicions and said I fit the criteria for ADD and diagnosed me with that.

    The consult didn't go as I thought it might, he didn't actually look at the bit from dad re childhood evidence and at time I felt like he wasn't that interested in what I had to say but I think thats more due to the fact that I have a habit of rambling and talking alot (and very fast).
    That said however I'm sure he must have to do hundreds of these consults and I'm sure he knows exactly what he's looking for very quickly, plus he is a very nice man to talk to and no pressure in any way. Medication was discussed but I wont mention that here as not 100% up to knowledge with the forum rules. Either way I'm happy as I now feel more eligible to register with college's disability services, not that I didn't before but I feel more empowered knowing i definitely have this versus me thinking I have something. Might do it before next semester starts as I have exams to repeat.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3 poolshapedmoon


    This post has been deleted.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30 Greengearz


    I can definitely echo everything you just said about the assessment.

    Especially in terms of what I had to pay for what I experienced. Frustrating but I guess It's a start, and I would feel alot worse if I came a way with no answer, Ie paying that money for nothing, that would sting a lot more.

    I kinda had the feeling that anyone could go in and answer yes to all his questions and walk out with a diagnosis. (Really hope I am wrong with that one) I got all the sheets you got as well.

    I'll probably look at Ritalin as well as I could use that inconsistent (Ie I'm thinking only when I really really need it for college exams/assignments etc.
    Although with that I've just wasted 7 hours on the internet and only really sent a few emails and I have 7 (late) reports due plus other stuff I haven't made myself crack on with it yet..


    He also tried the Asperger thing with me and kept asking was I loner but I shut that down quite fast. I think all in all the appt lasted around 25 mins.

    For anyone who takes Ritalin and has to pay the full whack for it (Ie no medical card, how much did you pay?.. hope its okay to ask this Q on here)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3 poolshapedmoon


    This post has been deleted.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30 Greengearz


    This post has been deleted.

    Rant away, I totally feel ya, especially after paying that amount of money!

    Re the feeling about him potentially diagnosing anyone, I'm going to just stop thinking about that fact as I feel it could play on my mind in the sense that our diagnoses are not as valid, if that makes sense?
    Plus I'm hoping only people who really feel they would have this would be willing to pay the 350 and not just any Tom, dick or harry.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4 Kirrels


    Hi all, I am glad to find this thread. I stumbled upon ADHD and Asperger's syndrome online, while looking into finding explanations for issues I have had since childhood. I will be 50 in July. It culminated in me needing to know why driving a car has been so difficult for me, learning over the last 10 years and failing. I'm back starting lessons again (gulp). Behaviours I had in childhood and difficulties I experience point to Autism spectrum and ADHD. School was always difficult. I hated the school yard, could not make friends, and actually didn't understand the rushing about and pushing and noise kids made. I was really quiet and hated noise of groups of other kids. I preferred to play alone at home. I would shake a small favourite object that kinda vibrated when shaken, and this would somehow stimulate my imagination. My parents ignored or didn't discuss this with me at all. They died when I was 17. I wish I could ask them for feedback now about my childhood. I didn't continue this play behaviour past 17 though. I had fluctuating grades in school, I could fail a subject and at a push get a 'b' in it if I focused totally on it. This was all exhausting and a huge effort. I would then barely pass other subjects if I worked on one to succeed at. I was obsessed with dogs and nature throughout childhood. My mother snapping at me to stop gong on and on about it. I hope I can look into seeing a professional soon and get light shed on stuff. I appreciate your insights and experiences. I guess it will be expensive to see somebody. Will see how it goes.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭Feu


    Hi Kirrels,

    so sorry to hear of your struggles growing up, and your parents early death.

    there is a handy brief overview of getting assessed here on the Aspire website: http://www.aspireireland.ie/cmsWP/whatisaspergersyndrome/assessment/ There are some names I know on there, and some I don't, so can't really speak to all of their professionalism. As noted above though, some psychiatrists can be helpful in their expediency, but perhaps not as thorough.

    In my experience of working with adults with diagnosed and undiagnosed ADHD and ASD, 95% of the time, getting a diagnosis was found to be helpful. People could understand why things had happened in certain ways, or see behaviours repeating through families. While getting a diagnosis does not "fix" difficulties you may have had, it explains that things that were difficult were not your fault.

    While adults services for people with autism are patchy at best, having a dual diagnosis would certainly find you a place on an Adult Mental Health Team, especially if you wanted to try medication for ADHD. Have you chatted to your GP about your concerns?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4 Kirrels


    Hi Feu,
    I will try discuss with a gp. I was about to talk to my gp in Dublin but he retired. I have moved to Cork recently and am looking for a good gp. I went to a new one last month and he wasn't good (It was my first visit and he didn't ask about a family medical history, was very brief in asking mine).A good while ago I emailed the office off a woman in Dublin working with Aspergers in adults, I asked about likely cost of a test. A secretary replied and was polite but didn't tell me how much it would cost and told me that the procedure involves me phoning the psychiatrist and that based on my phone call a meeting to proceed might be suggested. I felt very uncomfortable and nervous about phoning a psychiatrist in the hopes that I can appear either ADHD and/or AS 'enough' over one phone call to convince a psychiatrist to meet me. I did not proceed with that person. Anyway I have issues phoning strangers. I will find a GP and see how that route goes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭Feu


    Hi Kirrels

    sorry to hear that. I understand that talking to a strange doctor on the phone would be difficult for many people. I imagine it is to root out any people that clearly do not have this condition, and that it would be a waste of their and the doctors time. (not that people are deliberately time-wasting, just that it could be depression or anxiety or dyspraxia, none of which it is necessary to go to an autism specific clinic for). That being said, in any consultation, try not to worry too much about appearing ASD "enough". If this has been impacting you lifelong, then for any professional working in the field, this is sufficient.

    You've highlighted a pro and a con about the Irish "system" of adult diagnosis around ADHD/ASD and other conditions Kirrels. If you are pretty sure you have ADHD or ASD, you can go to an area specific expert, who will diagnose you. But if you just know there's "something there" but aren't sure what, it can actually be a frustrating and very long journey.

    And has been noted above, some health professionals are also keen to diagnose people with conditions they may not have, and some health professionals don't believe in things like ADHD or think that DCD or ASD are much less common than they actually are, and GPs, for example, can be dismissive and/or reluctant to refer people on


  • Registered Users Posts: 250 ✭✭DrWu


    Great thread. I haven't had a chance to read back on the whole thing, I just dipped into a few pages and found a lot of the posts fascinating.

    One thing I think is worth mentioning is the link between ADD/ADHD and self-medication (apologies if this has been covered already). Alcohol and illegal drugs can often be a crutch for young people and adults living with undiagnosed (and sometimes diagnosed) ADD/ADHD. It certainly was in my case. I would say I had a decade (in my 20's) where my ADD symptoms were virtually non-present, largely due to the fact that I was self-medicating. However, inevitably the tail starts to wag the dog and other more serious problems surface. Thought I'd share this to see if other people with ADD had a similar experience.


  • Registered Users Posts: 250 ✭✭DrWu


    By the way there is a great book about ADD by Thomas Hartmann called Hunters in a Farmers World. Parts of it go a little too far IMO but the basic premise is sound.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Was fired from my job. All the reasons that were described why things wouldnt work out in my job- I couldnt focus, concentrate, couldnt respond to stress and when it got busy. These were all told to me by my manager who had no idea I have adhd.

    The social isolation and complete inability to make friends is leaving me feel devestated.

    I spend every day alone, unable to work, nobody to call, no friends to share my good news with.

    had no reason to get out of bed today so I went back to bed.

    If there are any people in Cork who would like to arrange a regular adult adhd meet-up as I'm sure there must be others like me who are experiencing these things too.

    I was diagnosed with aspergers too by fitzgerald - I refused to believe it. I was then assessed again and the diagnosis was similiar - pervasive developmental disorder - not otherwise specified with aspergers tendencies.

    so guys to the folks who think that their appointment wasnt long enough or that aspergers was tacked on at the end - please just go for another assessment. I didnt want to believ it for a long time but as time has gone on I realise more and more that he was right.

    I also think that in the future adhd and asd/aspergers will be lumped into the same category eventually.
    there is so much overlap - sensory issues etc. social cues. SO while aspergers may be an extreme diagnosis for many, including me - he may have been better off to describe PDD-NOS or mild aspergers. I thought - but i can look people in the eye, but I also get very stressed if a plan changes, loud noises, smells, touch - none of this is adhd, its a sonsory processing disorder - which is not a recognised disorder yet.

    So go get another assessment if your unsure of his diagnosis. you can go and get an assessment that lasts 6 hours, go through a battery of tests and still probably have the same diagnosis - please dont be offended - I went through the same process of WHat! aspergers??? possibly a more generalised diagnosis that we are not comfortable with.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,540 ✭✭✭Seanachai


    cannex wrote: »
    Was fired from my job. All the reasons that were described why things wouldnt work out in my job- I couldnt focus, concentrate, couldnt respond to stress and when it got busy. These were all told to me by my manager who had no idea I have adhd.

    The social isolation and complete inability to make friends is leaving me feel devestated.

    I spend every day alone, unable to work, nobody to call, no friends to share my good news with.

    had no reason to get out of bed today so I went back to bed.

    If there are any people in Cork who would like to arrange a regular adult adhd meet-up as I'm sure there must be others like me who are experiencing these things too.

    I was diagnosed with aspergers too by fitzgerald - I refused to believe it. I was then assessed again and the diagnosis was similiar - pervasive developmental disorder - not otherwise specified with aspergers tendencies.

    so guys to the folks who think that their appointment wasnt long enough or that aspergers was tacked on at the end - please just go for another assessment. I didnt want to believ it for a long time but as time has gone on I realise more and more that he was right.

    I also think that in the future adhd and asd/aspergers will be lumped into the same category eventually.
    there is so much overlap - sensory issues etc. social cues. SO while aspergers may be an extreme diagnosis for many, including me - he may have been better off to describe PDD-NOS or mild aspergers. I thought - but i can look people in the eye, but I also get very stressed if a plan changes, loud noises, smells, touch - none of this is adhd, its a sonsory processing disorder - which is not a recognised disorder yet.

    So go get another assessment if your unsure of his diagnosis. you can go and get an assessment that lasts 6 hours, go through a battery of tests and still probably have the same diagnosis - please dont be offended - I went through the same process of WHat! aspergers??? possibly a more generalised diagnosis that we are not comfortable with.

    I'm having some of the same issues in work, I've been accused of being disinterested despite getting the work done. There is work out there where people with our issues can work away without being put under such pressure. I'm reading about these conditions a lot and I'm not so sure it's entirely a genetic predisposition, I think there's an as yet undiscovered viral or environmental link that affects people who are more vulnerable due to their genetics. The current medications while beneficial to some could be superseded by another form of treatment that targets that actual cause of the problem.

    If I can get the money together I'm going to go down the road of looking for viral issues and vitamin and mineral deficiencies and I'll post the results on here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18 Orionis


    How's everyone doing?

    Just to let people know that I saw recently that there is an Adult ADHD support group being launched in Dublin by HADD. The first meeting is this coming Tuesday August 15th at 7pm. I don't know any more then that I'm afraid but the impression I get is that up till now HADD has been mostly focused on children and their families but is trying to now improve their focus and supports for Adults which is great. Maybe people on here would like to go?

    Some more details here...

    http://hadd.ie/news/adhd-adult-support-group-launched


  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭Feu


    Dublin North West Area Partnership and HADD are putting on a one day seminar in DIT (grangegorman) on 20th September http://www.dnwap.ie/2017/08/01/adhd-seminar/

    It's free but places are limited. Think it would be well worth attending, especially people new to the diagnosis.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,657 ✭✭✭somefeen


    Hello
    I posted on this thread a few months ago and was very grateful for the replies. I just forgot to to post again..
    I was prescribed Concerta back in January. Seemed to help. I got a job but left a few weeks ago. I could see the same pattern I always had repeating itself and the medication didnt seem to help as much in a work environment. I stopped taking them and I decided to bail before I got fired or went into the same self loathing spiral as before.

    I went back on the medication a few weeks ago but no sign of any changes.
    I was never given a formal diagnosis. But I did complete the DIVA assessment which gave a strong indication towards ADHD.
    I was back with the mental health primary care team last week and they are arranging an appt with a Clinical Psychologist to get a proper diagnosis. I've also got an appointment with an Occupational Therapist.
    Just wondering if anyone could give any insight as to what to expect from either of these appointments?
    Feeling very frustrated with myself at the moment.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭Feu


    somefeen wrote: »
    Hello
    I posted on this thread a few months ago and was very grateful for the replies. I just forgot to to post again..
    I was prescribed Concerta back in January. Seemed to help. I got a job but left a few weeks ago. I could see the same pattern I always had repeating itself and the medication didnt seem to help as much in a work environment. I stopped taking them and I decided to bail before I got fired or went into the same self loathing spiral as before.

    I went back on the medication a few weeks ago but no sign of any changes.
    I was never given a formal diagnosis. But I did complete the DIVA assessment which gave a strong indication towards ADHD.
    I was back with the mental health primary care team last week and they are arranging an appt with a Clinical Psychologist to get a proper diagnosis. I've also got an appointment with an Occupational Therapist.
    Just wondering if anyone could give any insight as to what to expect from either of these appointments?
    Feeling very frustrated with myself at the moment.

    What kind of patterns develop at work? I wonder if other people might identify or have suggestions. If you've no diagnosis how did you get prescribed Concerta ? ( not a dig, just curious!)
    Some people find it can take up to 8 weeks for effects to accumulate and kick in, but you should be feeling more focused at the least! That being said, the different medications work differently for different people, and some people go through the 2 or 3 without much success. They say medication is successful for about 80% of people with true adhd/add

    While medication (when it works) is a big part of the puzzle, behavioural and lifestyle changes are really important too. I have detailed some of these above, and cannot recommend any without knowing your individual difficulties,but generally things like sleep hygiene, organizational habits, and psycho education about your own conditions and acknowledgment of your strengths and difficulties. Since I am an OT, this may be what the OT will cover with you, but it may not :)
    How the meeting is focused will depend on the setting, reason the referral, and clinicians own experience.
    In my experience, many health professionals are not overly experienced with adult ADHD, but since this is part of the query, you should be fine. THE OT will probably ask you what you want to improve, and may set some goals with you, and may do some kind of assessment, I can't say which one without knowing your case, but it will be painless :) OTs in a nutshell want to help you improve your function and quality of life and therefore are generally speaking client centred and practically focused. Before you meet with them, try to think about if you could just improve one aspect /area, what would it be?

    For the psychologist, again depending on their background, they may do a series of assessments and ask you lots of questions, including about your childhood. I would imagine they will also try to rule things out, often a cognitive test is given to rule out learning difficulties. Again, they should be nice, they are trying to help you :) sorry I can't be more specific, but it's hard without knowing more details, :) some people have outlined above what their assessments were like, and it's usually fine.

    Lastly, try not to feel too frustrated with yourself. It sounds like you are being proactive and seeking out the support you need. You have asked for and are getting help. As many people reading this can attest, the road of adult diagnosis of any neurological conditionis a long and rocky one, but you are further along them most, and in a good situation by being linked in with a team already. While things are difficult at the moment, try to focus on the proactive things you have done.

    If you have more questions just put them out here :) and do let us know how you get on. I think this page is a brilliant resource (although it is getting long and therefore may be tricky for some people with adhd to read through in its entirety! ), and the more info we can pull together about people's experiences the better.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,657 ✭✭✭somefeen


    Feu wrote: »
    What kind of patterns develop at work? I wonder if other people might identify or have suggestions. If you've no diagnosis how did you get prescribed Concerta ? ( not a dig, just curious!)
    Some people find it can take up to 8 weeks for effects to accumulate and kick in, but you should be feeling more focused at the least! That being said, the different medications work differently for different people, and some people go through the 2 or 3 without much success. They say medication is successful for about 80% of people with true adhd/add

    While medication (when it works) is a big part of the puzzle, behavioural and lifestyle changes are really important too. I have detailed some of these above, and cannot recommend any without knowing your individual difficulties,but generally things like sleep hygiene, organizational habits, and psycho education about your own conditions and acknowledgment of your strengths and difficulties. Since I am an OT, this may be what the OT will cover with you, but it may not :)
    How the meeting is focused will depend on the setting, reason the referral, and clinicians own experience.
    In my experience, many health professionals are not overly experienced with adult ADHD, but since this is part of the query, you should be fine. THE OT will probably ask you what you want to improve, and may set some goals with you, and may do some kind of assessment, I can't say which one without knowing your case, but it will be painless :) OTs in a nutshell want to help you improve your function and quality of life and therefore are generally speaking client centred and practically focused. Before you meet with them, try to think about if you could just improve one aspect /area, what would it be?

    For the psychologist, again depending on their background, they may do a series of assessments and ask you lots of questions, including about your childhood. I would imagine they will also try to rule things out, often a cognitive test is given to rule out learning difficulties. Again, they should be nice, they are trying to help you :) sorry I can't be more specific, but it's hard without knowing more details, :) some people have outlined above what their assessments were like, and it's usually fine.

    Lastly, try not to feel too frustrated with yourself. It sounds like you are being proactive and seeking out the support you need. You have asked for and are getting help. As many people reading this can attest, the road of adult diagnosis of any neurological conditionis a long and rocky one, but you are further along them most, and in a good situation by being linked in with a team already. While things are difficult at the moment, try to focus on the proactive things you have done.

    If you have more questions just put them out here :) and do let us know how you get on. I think this page is a brilliant resource (although it is getting long and therefore may be tricky for some people with adhd to read through in its entirety! ), and the more info we can pull together about people's experiences the better.


    Thanks for your response. You were very detailed and thorough so I'm going to try and do it justice.

    I've definitely been prescribed Concerta. I think you might not be the first person to question how I got it without an official diagnosis so I'm curious now myself. It is Concerta though, says so on the bottle, prescription says Concerta and the pills match the description. Unless its some kind of placebo. I get the prescription from my GP.

    The problems I have at work are many and varied, perhaps not all to do with ADHD. I get bored very easliy, any kind of routine eventually becomes soul destroying. This is not the regular 'I hate my job kind of boring' this is agony, almost physically painful and I find it very hard to cope. In one previous job I had, what looking back on it now were probably panic attacks. 10-15 minutes in the morning curled into a ball on the kitchen floor. I'm a grown man and I consider myself resilient. I generally handle stress well, but boredom....jesus.
    Since I get so bored I find it very hard to maintain focus. I find focusing hard anyway but in my last job I would usually be going around doing the morning rounds on my own and I would lose focus and end up staring off into space.
    It slowed me down alot and led to errors that I'd have to go back and correct making it worse.
    The only time I could really focus and get the job done in a timely fashion was when it absolutely had to be done by a certain time or there would be an actual consequence. By that I mean something real would happen, like a truck woudlnt leave on time or I wouldnt be ready for another job that had to be done that day. Its hard to explain but I think I've realised that certain pressures don't click with me. Getting it done fast because I want to be a good worker and keep my boss happy just doesnt work for me because the consequences of failing in that regard are vague and not defined.

    Then there is the attention to detail. I just don't have it.

    I also hate being told what to do. Time and time again I have tried to just suck it up and get on with it but it hurts. A bit like the boredom.
    Like the above example. My boss and coworkers mentioned that I was slow getting the mornings work done. It was pretty obvious that none of them were impressed with the amount of time it would take me. That made it worse for me, because now the last thing on earth I was going to do was go faster. If the lord himself came down and gave me a wondrous potion that would make me go faster in the mornings and stay focused, I'd have told him where to shove it.

    A more extreme example. In the job where I was having panic attacks due to the boredom, I was consistently late. Due in part to the effort required to extricate myself from the fetal position on the kitchen floor but also due to the fact I would wake up in the morning when my alarm went off...and then forget to get out of bed.
    My boss mentioned it to me and told me to make sure I was on time because I was always late. From that point on I made sure I was atleast 5 minutes late every day.

    I'm reading back on this realising I probably just sound like an arsehole. Its still beyond my comprehension how anyone can be told by there boss they need to work faster, be earlier, be tidier etc and then actually go out and do it. I don't know why, Im generally a helpful person and I work hard really. I put in the hours and never complain about problems or conditions, I do overtime without any problems.
    Maybe I just have an aversion to being asked to correct problems that I feel I simply can't solve? But I also just hate being given an order or told how to do something. If my boss says 'clean up that stuff you spilled' or 'thats not how X is supposed to done' right on the tip of my tongue is a massive **** YOU! and then I hate myself for just saying 'OK yeah, no bother'

    On the subject of solving problems. I get to wrapped up in an issue an focus solely on that to detriment of everything else. I remember we had a minor technical issue in my last job. Nothing major, a tail lift on a truck wasn't working as it should and all the wiring was rotten. We didnt really need it to work it just would have been handy if it was. My boss was away for two days and I spent all that time trying to get this thing working instead of what I was supposed to be doing, I kept saying just another five minutes, I tried and go and do something else but all I could think about was this damn tail lift and why it wasn't working. My boss came back and I still didnt have it working. He seemed a bit annoyed that I'd 'wasted' so much time on it. H told me not to spend anymore time on it because there was other stuff that had to be done. So later that evening when everyone had gone home, I came back and kept working on it. I couldn't stop myself. I fixed it anyway but I don't think anyone noticed.
    I can't really understand verbal instructions either. It just turns into noise. I really feel like an idiot when I don't understand what someone is asking me to do. "Bring five bags of cement and put them on that trailer and then load up the van with 2 shovels and 3 rakes". I probably look like a complete idiot when I have to stop and think about what was a fairly simple set of instructions.
    I'm sure people I work with think of me as a dope and because of everything else I never really get trusted with anything too important. I really hurts my self esteem and there are times i believe i am just an idiot.


    ****ing hell I just looked back on how much I've written. I was not expecting to write a novel ::eek:


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    I'm the same, I get bored very easily and struggle to understand verbal instructions.

    Anyway the main point is that the medication will not do anything on its own, sure it will help you to focus a little bit better but the main issue as an adult who is new to the diagnosis of adhd is that we generally have a lot of unhealthy coping mechanisms due to compensating for the deficit in attention and everything else that goes with adhd.

    So.......you need CBT for ADHD, Cognitive behavioural therapy so you can learn healthy coping mchanisms, coupled with taking your medication you will find yourself in a better state of mind to put what you have learned in cbt to proper use.

    It starts from the second you wake up all the way to your bedtime routine, you have to look at it all, dont do it alone, get help.


    I had an occupational therapist, while she did help a little bit, the problem is that she wasnt trained to deal with adult adhd so she was treating me with a therapy that is designed for people who are clinially depressed, while adhd can cause depression, the adhd need to be treated first and foremost, then the depression will generally disappear when the adhd is treated.

    In a nutshell
    meds will not work alone - not a magic pill
    get CBT - check out www.mymind.ie for affordable cbt therapy.
    Everything you are experiencing is typical for the majority of adults who realise they have adhd
    You will get through it, keep powering on, and forget about that job, you need to get the adhd under control first before you can thrive in the work place. dont be so hard on yourself -

    ADHD is a disability that effects all aspects of life - untreated it is really tough - treated - you will thrive - i promise you that - so keep going!!!



    Hope that helps, ask away if any more questions.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,760 ✭✭✭Effects


    What kind of meds are you on? Did you have to go through a load of different ones until you find the right meds?
    I've been on a few in the past but haven't been on any in about 4 or 5 years. Been thinking of going back to my Doctor to try something again as my ADD is getting a bit hard to manage at the moment.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,657 ✭✭✭somefeen


    cannex wrote: »
    I'm the same, I get bored very easily and struggle to understand verbal instructions.

    Anyway the main point is that the medication will not do anything on its own, sure it will help you to focus a little bit better but the main issue as an adult who is new to the diagnosis of adhd is that we generally have a lot of unhealthy coping mechanisms due to compensating for the deficit in attention and everything else that goes with adhd.

    So.......you need CBT for ADHD, Cognitive behavioural therapy so you can learn healthy coping mchanisms, coupled with taking your medication you will find yourself in a better state of mind to put what you have learned in cbt to proper use.

    It starts from the second you wake up all the way to your bedtime routine, you have to look at it all, dont do it alone, get help.


    I had an occupational therapist, while she did help a little bit, the problem is that she wasnt trained to deal with adult adhd so she was treating me with a therapy that is designed for people who are clinially depressed, while adhd can cause depression, the adhd need to be treated first and foremost, then the depression will generally disappear when the adhd is treated.

    In a nutshell
    meds will not work alone - not a magic pill
    get CBT - check out www.mymind.ie for affordable cbt therapy.
    Everything you are experiencing is typical for the majority of adults who realise they have adhd
    You will get through it, keep powering on, and forget about that job, you need to get the adhd under control first before you can thrive in the work place. dont be so hard on yourself -

    ADHD is a disability that effects all aspects of life - untreated it is really tough - treated - you will thrive - i promise you that - so keep going!!!



    Hope that helps, ask away if any more questions.

    Could I ask if you've noticed any improvements since starting the CBT and medication?

    What does CBT actually do for ADD. I suppose I am wary of the treatment as well. There's parts of ADD that I like and I don't want to be moulded into a good little member of society if you know what I mean.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    What I did in CBT was literally organisation skills. With adhd, prioritizing is difficult, everything is just as important as everything else so i learned a few techniques to plan my day, week, how to put things in order of importance. Basically I looked at ways my disorganization lead to all sorts of problems long term and short term.

    There was no moulding me into a different person, I just learned some skills that normal people dont have to learn.
    Also we looked at catastrophizing - which is something a person with adhd tends to do too - so we looked at my reactions and the most likely scenario as opposed to my version of events, which were normally worst case scenario.

    I could do with doing some more CBT, I had 10 sessions but all CBT is, is learning practical life skills and looking at behaviours that help to offset the effects of having a neurobiological disorder like adhd.
    Here is a excerpt taken from

    ADDiTUDE MAGAZINE
    https://www.additudemag.com/cognitive-behavioral-therapy-for-adhd/

    How Exactly Does CBT Improve ADHD in Adults?

    While it is fascinating to learn how CBT may change the brain, most patients with ADHD just want to get out the door without wasting 20 minutes looking for their keys. CBT helps patients manage such everyday challenges.

    CBT intervenes to lessen life impairments — procrastination, time management, and other common difficulties — not to treat the core symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.

    CBT sessions focus on identifying the situations in which poor planning, disorganization, and poor time and task management create challenges in a patient’s day-to-day life. Sessions may help an individual deal with obligations such as paying bills or completing work on time, and encourage endeavors that provide personal fulfillment and well-being, such as sleep, exercise, or hobbies. Learning about ADHD is always a good starting point, as it reinforces the message that ADHD is not a character flaw and demonstrates the neurological underpinnings of daily challenges.

    Most adults with ADHD say, “I know what I need to do, I just don’t do it.” CBT focuses on adopting coping strategies, managing negative expectations and emotions, and unwinding behavioral patterns that interfere with the strategies.

    [How CBT Can Help Change Your Behavior]

    The goals and session agendas of CBT center on scenarios and challenges that the patient has encountered and, more important, expects to encounter, particularly between sessions. The therapist uses take-away reminders, follow-up check-ins, and other ways of making coping skills “sticky,” so that they are used outside of the consulting room. Ultimately, the way that a patient with ADHD functions in everyday life is the best measure of whether the therapy is helping.
    What Is a Typical CBT Session Like?

    CBT is administered in many different formats, and each therapist tailors sessions to a patient’s individual needs. Each session’s agenda provides a benchmark for identifying when the discussion is straying off course. Early sessions typically involve an introduction to CBT, the structure of sessions, and setting and refining therapy goals (making them specific, realistic, and actionable), as well as developing action plans for what the patient will do outside of the office. (See “CBT Success Stories.”)

    Subsequent sessions focus on identifying the most important life situations affecting the patient, and developing coping skills to handle those situations. For each agenda item, the therapist and patient work together to reverse-engineer the challenge to better understand its nature, including a review of the impact of thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and other factors that have interfered with handling the situation

    Using the CBT framework breaks down the tough task of “managing ADHD” into specific tactics for navigating transition points in a day — getting up and off to work on time, starting a project that you’ve been avoiding, or setting a time to review a daily planner — which increases coping skills. These coping steps are strategized in a session (and written down as take-away reminders) to use between sessions.

    Some of the in-session CBT exercises are based on simple ideas: “Many people with ADHD don’t wear a watch,” says Dr. Mary Solanto, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine. However, remembering to wear a watch, placing clocks all over the house, and keeping a detailed log of the day helps a lot with time management. How does someone with ADHD remember to do all that? Simple mantras (“If it’s not in the planner, it doesn’t exist”) are basic forms of CBT. They serve as reminders to change one’s thought patterns.

    “We teach them that, if they are having trouble getting started on a project, the first step is too big,” Solanto says.

    Solanto advises her patients to write down in their ADHD-friendly planners every task they have to do in a given day — from important appointments to everyday errands. She asks clients to link checking the planner to routine activities, like brushing your teeth, eating lunch, walking the dog, and so on. This helps someone with ADHD stay on task throughout the day, and prioritizes the things to get done. “People with ADHD spend a lot of time putting out fires, instead of thinking ahead to prevent those fires,” says Solanto, who has recently outlined her work in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adult ADHD: Targeting Executive Dysfunction. The book teaches therapists how to apply and use Solanto’s brand of CBT in their own practices.

    CBT makes it easy to address other important issues that affect ADHD symptoms — co-existing mood and anxiety disorders, addictions to technology and gaming, a job search, or overall lifestyle habits — sleep, exercise, and one’s self-esteem.
    How Do CBT and Medications Mix?

    Quite well. For some individuals, using ADHD medications alone results in both symptom improvements and better management of adult responsibilities. Most individuals, however, find that they need CBT to target ongoing struggles with disorganization and procrastination, despite being on ADHD stimulants. As has been said many times, “pills don’t teach skills.” The combination of medication and CBT is often the treatment of choice for dealing with the wide-ranging effects of ADHD.

    There’s no evidence that CBT can replace drug therapy for ADHD, or even permit lower dosages, but research does suggest that it works better for ADHD than do other forms of therapy. A 2010 study by Boston’s Massachusetts General Hospital found that a combination of drug therapy and CBT was more effective at controlling ADHD symptoms than was drug therapy alone.

    “CBT picks up where medication leaves off,” says Steven A. Safren, Ph.D., leader of the study and assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University. “Even after optimal treatment with medication, most adults have residual symptoms, and this treatment appears to make them better.”

    When Can I Expect to See Results?

    Results come quickly. CBT typically yields benefits after only 12 to 15 one-hour sessions. However, most patients continue with CBT much longer, as it emphasizes long-term maintenance of coping skills and improvements. In fact, the length of time spent in treatment — over many months, say — is as important as the number of sessions a person undergoes.

    Some people ask whether they should take a month off from work or school and do a CBT “boot camp” for four or five weeks. This is generally not recommended. CBT aims to help individuals make sustained changes in their daily lives. Instead of attending 20 daily sessions of CBT in a month, a patient should stretch out those sessions over six months to turn his new skills into habits and to weave them into his lifestyle. This allows time and practice for mastering coping strategies for paying monthly bills, organizing work or school issues, and pursuing other tasks and endeavors in real time.

    Some individuals return to CBT for “booster sessions” to address a challenge if they’ve fallen into old habits. Some resume CBT to adapt their coping skills to a major life change, such as having a child or losing a job."


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Effects wrote: »
    What kind of meds are you on? Did you have to go through a load of different ones until you find the right meds?
    I've been on a few in the past but haven't been on any in about 4 or 5 years. Been thinking of going back to my Doctor to try something again as my ADD is getting a bit hard to manage at the moment.

    I was forst prescribed with strattera - hated them, then it was Ritalin long acting and I am still on them but I'm sorry for the extremely short response - but its the same answer - meds alone do nothing really except make you focus better with bad habits and coping skills skewed by adhd. Look at the post on CBT specifically for ADHD.

    Please people believe me :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    somefeen wrote: »
    Could I ask if you've noticed any improvements since starting the CBT and medication?
    Yes I noticed a lot of improvements, basically I keep an organiser, i write everything down, I rely on my medication to get me through my day in college and I also rely on the meds to stop me from over-reacting to everything, sounds, people, emotions.

    I was on meds for about a year before I got CBT and they did fcuk all because I still had no clue how to organise my daily life, we need to learn these things.
    The cbt helped me to plan ahead and without the combination of bothmeds and life skills, the meds are actually pointless!!!

    ok rambling now!


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,760 ✭✭✭Effects


    cannex wrote: »
    I was forst prescribed with strattera - hated them, then it was Ritalin long acting.

    Please people believe me :)

    Ah yes, just remembered I was on Strattera for a while. Doc even tried Zyban as it works in some cases even though it's for smoking! Might see what he says about Ritalin.
    It's the focus that's my problem at the moment. I also need to get back to regular yoga which I found was helping.
    I'll have a read of the CBT thread too.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Please watch this, only 17mins long:


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