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Adult ADHD Advice

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  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭Feu


    empacher wrote: »
    Hi guys looking for whatever advice I can get. Got diagnosed as an adult about two years ago. First my a psychologist, then got refereed to the HSE in Galway.

    I've being on two different forms of meds, straterra and concerta. Both didnt agree with me even after taking them for a few weeks.

    The last appointment I had with the HSE the psychiatrist. Said something along the lines of '' That I wasn't that bad of a case, and that meds might even help me" he then gave me a prescription for fish oils and said they might help.

    The psychologist who originally diagnosed me said I'd never be able to complete college without the help of medication.

    So at the moment I'm in the middle of exams, can't focus enough to get any meaningful study done. sometimes I'm here for 12hrs and get maybe 2hrs work actually done.

    During the college year, I'd get 5 minutes into a lecture before I'd switch off. Which kind of left me teaching myself for the year.

    Particularly for second semester every assignment was either submitted late or not submitted.

    Am I wasting my time going the HSE route? Should I go private, and what roughly is the cost. I'm thinking if i get past these exams. Next years going to be worse again.

    If anyone can recommend anyone in Galway to see, or am i best travelling to Dublin?

    Hi Empacher,

    regardless of medication, like greengearz and Liz I'd really recommend registering with your disability office for additional supports. At the minimum, you would be entitled to exam accommodations, which might boost performance come exam time. In NUIG (if thats where you are!) they have educational support workers, and OT, both of whom can help you develop strategies and routines to keep on track. I know this is not that helpful now, but definitely for next year, or even repeats (but fingers crossed you'll pass everything).

    Most of the bigger colleges and ITs have AT officers also. Assistive Technology staff can recommend software or equipment that may help to ameliorate some of the difficulties associated with ADD/ADHD , for example, Livescribe pens, Read & Write Gold, Speech to text stuff, etc. This can improve attention and performance in class, and when studying. Some colleges (e.g. Trinity, NUIG) also have specific AT areas in their libraries, specifically for students with disabilities, where there are extra resources, e.g. soundproof areas.

    any questions on the college stuff, let me know
    Re: medication, since you have tried both stimulant and non-stimulant, it may be that you want to research this more yourself, but did you have a chance to thoroughly discuss side effects with prescribing doctor?

    I think there is evidence that fish oils improve brain function, but that is for everyone, not just for people with ADHD. There is some evidence that a high protein diet can contribute to higher production of amino acids, which contributes to increased dopamine and norepinephrine production, which could reduce novelty seeking and disorganisation, but i can't find the paper now.

    However, as others have mentioned, a number of factors can contribute to improved function, regardless of medication. I.e. high amounts of aerobic exercise, higher protein intake, improved routine & sleep, and counselling, may be beneficial to all people with adhd (and everyone else too!).


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,616 ✭✭✭masculinist


    Never mind. I just realised my question was bordering on some sort of medication dosage question which tends to be frowned upon in forums like these.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30 Greengearz


    Feu wrote: »
    I'd really recommend registering with your disability office for additional supports. I know this is not that helpful now, but definitely for next year, or even repeats (but fingers crossed you'll pass everything)

    Any questions on the college stuff, let me know ...

    I know for a fact, I failed one as I didn't/ couldn't study for the exam, it's not the area I am naturally very good one (without putting the time in).

    My counsellor suggested I register with the disability office but I would rather try and get diagnosed first if possible so I can have some 'evidence' to show for myself so to speak, if I cant get an appt before September I'll pop in when I'm back or before and just express my concerns.

    Just last night I sat down at my laptop to answer one email at 10pm, come 2:30 am I had 20 tabs open and I was researching and looking at many things and got my photos sorted out but went to bed without the email being replied to. Had 4 hours sleep, Lack of sleep doesn't really affect me that much, I can function seemingly fine with no ill effects. If I do get a decent amount 7+ hours, I can feel much more restless and full of even more energy. Came on my laptop this evening early around 6pm to get reports done (they seem to have no definite deadline which makes it worse.) I'm still on my laptop and haven't got even one started!

    MrSzyslak, Anyway I went for an assessment with Michael Fitzgerald ..... €350, and was diagnosed with ADHD and I was lucky to get a cancellation and received an appointment in five days. The appointment ran for about 35 minutes"

    I think I'm going to try and get an appt with Dr Fitzgerald.... website seems to be down tonight but I think I'll go down that route........... http://professormichaelfitzgerald.eu/consulting-room/

    I have a medical card and would go down through my local GP route but the long waiting times is off putting, I might not even be seen before I finish college knowing Irish waiting times lol

    Only thing is I'm not sure about bringing my parents with me as one doesn't believe in the condition (although I have a strong suspicion she may have it, wont go into her symptoms now but I've been observing and looking back over my childhood and over the years, a lot makes sense.)


  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭Feu


    Hi Greengearz! Haha sorry lost the run of myself there and forgot you don't have a diagnosis. IT seems like you are close to getting that arranged, you could phone Dr Fitzgerald's secretary and ask for their opinion on bringing a parent, I know several people diagnosed as adults who didn't bring a parent, and several who did, so I don't think its a hard rule. Also, a parent who doesn't believe in the condition may still be able to accurately give an account of your behaviour as a youngster. You could bring an older sibling or aunt/uncle if you think this could be more neutral.

    All that said, for the college bound, a person can register with their college disability service with a diagnosis of any of a wide range of physical or mental health conditions i.e. a person could register with a disability service because they have hearing loss, but may avail of supports that support their attention or mental health. Once you're in, support will be forthcoming. Some disability services will take a referral from college counselling, some won't. Check that out.

    quite good article here: http://www.irishtimes.com/student-hub/adhd-the-diagnosis-which-saved-my-life-1.2853783 of one person's account of getting a diagnosis while at college.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18 Orionis


    Greengearz, as Feu said don't worry too much about whether to bring someone with you or not. Although it's certainly useful and some doctors will want you to, it's not essential by any means. The important thing is that they are able to get an accurate account of what you were like and how things were for you growing up. You might find it helpful to write out notes for yourself in advance of things you remember as a child or even to ask your parents to write a short letter for you.

    I know what you mean not wanting to bring a parent who doesn't think it's real. That can be very frustrating. That phrase always amuses me though. Nobody believes in ADHD as belief has absolutely nothing to do with it. It is not some quasi religious belief. It's a scientific and empirical reality. A neurobiological developmental condition which is approx 80% heritable. About as heritable as height is!

    The poster above mentioned that they may still be able to accurately give an account of things but I think I'd have to disagree to some extent. People who say they "don't believe in ADHD" generally exhibit all the features of science denialism. They typically deny certain realities, often as a way to avoid a psychologically uncomfortable truth. [In the context of Adult ADHD, perhaps this might be guilt at not getting a child help earlier or moralistic societal views in relation to lazyness, hard work etc that clash with the reality of ADHD and genetics. Cognitive dissonance is a powerful thing!

    The above may not be relevant to you but I reckon it's worth thinking about if you find that a parent has a rather different version of what things were like for you as a child or the difficulties you experienced/ are experiencing! Having a close family member invalidate your experiences like that can be very damaging and so that's why I'd encourage you to follow your own judgement on whether to bring someone with you. Weight the benefits I suppose.

    As it happens, the idea that to have ADHD as an adult you must have had it as a child may not even be true and is possibly just dogma. The current diagnostic criteria require you to have had symptoms before age 12. However, the choice of age 12 is arbitrary and there's lots of evidence that it can manifest for some people into their teens and beyond. The latest research suggests ADHD can actually occur in adulthood for the first time. This is still somewhat controversial but I guess the point is not to worry too much about whether you had it as a child. Many peoples experiences are that difficulties began for them later on.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 18 Orionis


    Orionis wrote: »
    Greengearz, as Feu said don't worry too much about whether to bring someone with you or not. Although it's certainly useful and some doctors will want you to, it's not essential by any means. The important thing is that they are able to get an accurate account of what you were like and how things were for you growing up. You might find it helpful to write out notes for yourself in advance of things you remember as a child or even to ask your parents to write a short letter for you.

    I know what you mean not wanting to bring a parent who doesn't think it's real. That can be very frustrating. That phrase always amuses me though. Nobody believes in ADHD as belief has absolutely nothing to do with it. It is not some quasi religious belief. It's a scientific and empirical reality. A neurobiological developmental condition which is approx 80% heritable. About as heritable as height is!

    The poster above mentioned that they may still be able to accurately give an account of things but I think I'd have to disagree to some extent. People who say they "don't believe in ADHD" generally exhibit all the features of science denialism. They typically deny certain realities, often as a way to avoid a psychologically uncomfortable truth. [In the context of Adult ADHD, perhaps this might be guilt at not getting a child help earlier or moralistic societal views in relation to lazyness, hard work etc that clash with the reality of ADHD and genetics. Cognitive dissonance is a powerful thing!

    The above may not be relevant to you but I reckon it's worth thinking about if you find a parent has a rather different version of what things were like for you as a child or the difficulties you experienced/ are experiencing! Having a close family member invalidate your experiences like that can be very damaging and so that's why I'd encourage you to follow your own judgement on whether to bring someone with you. Weight the benefits I suppose.

    As it happens, the idea that to have ADHD as an adult you must have had it as a child may not even be true and is possibly just dogma. The current diagnostic criteria require you to have had symptoms before age 12. However, the choice of age 12 is arbitrary and there's lots of evidence that it can manifest for some people into their teens and beyond. The latest research suggests it can manifest for the first time in adults. This is still somewhat controversial but I guess the point is not to worry too much about whether you had it as a child. Many peoples experiences are that difficulties began for them later on.

    Can you tell I have ADHD and have work I should be doing!? :rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,540 ✭✭✭Seanachai


    Orionis wrote: »
    In short, yes i'm afraid you are probably wasting your time with HSE. How did the psychiatrist reach the conclusion that you weren't that bad a case? The fact that as you said you have been submitting every assignment in college late or not at all [Welcome to to the club..!!] would really suggest otherwise. Unfortunately this is the trouble as you will find - too many doctors don't take the condition seriously and people suffer needlessly.

    I'm afraid it's safe to say that your psychiatrist probably doesn't know very much about ADHD at all. The evidence base for fish oils is pretty weak. And even at that, benefits are only seen at high doses with particular blends. Even then, the benefits are very small compared to the medications.

    What were the particular difficulties you had with strattera and concerta? You should consider whether it's possible the dosage was too low or indeed too high. I'm also wondering how long you took strattera for as the full benefits don't occur for 4+ weeks.

    If you really can't tolerate either and can rule them out, you could talk to the psychiatrist about Tyvense. It's not licensed here for adults but it is in the UK and would generally be the medication tried if Concerta (methylphenidate) doesn't work. Tyvense (lisdexamfetamine) works for a lot of people when methylphenidate doesn't. It's very popular in fact and works extremely well for a lot of us. Sorry, I appreciate all the drug names are confusing. Best bet is if you go back and discuss with the psychiatrist.

    I'm not aware of anyone in Galway i'm afraid. You could go see Michael Fitzgerald in Dublin who has been mentioned above and that's what I'd recommend to be honest. But bear in mind that no matter who you see, Ireland is 20+ years behind say the UK in terms of ADHD services so it's imperative you become your own expert to be honest. I'd recommend buying two books: Firstly read "Driven to Distraction" by Hallowell & Ratey (make sure you get the more recent updated version. Even then, the science is a bit dated but it's still the classic book on ADD and rightly so.) and secondly (once you have read driven to distraction) : The Adult ADHD Tool Kit by Ramsay & Rostain. [This is imho the best current book on ADHD in terms of psychological strategies and CBT though there's plenty of other excellent ones]

    But seeing as your in the middle of exams, I'd really suggest focusing on the basics. Regular sleep [Unfortunately sleep problems occur frequently with adhd. Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder is very common unfortunately. The very latest research suggests there's a genetic link between the two so don't beat yourself up if you have never slept well. Biology > Moralising!

    Also regular aerobic exercise [major benefits for adhd]

    But most importantly of all as I'm sure you know already [and you will still have to do this on the right Meds] is to structure your life. Timetable everything. Use to do lists. Create external accountability. Best of luck with the rest of exams! I hope this helps in some way. If you have any specific Q's, feel free to PM me.

    Is Tyvense covered under the drugs payment scheme or is it on special order?


  • Registered Users Posts: 226 ✭✭MrSzyslak


    Orionis wrote: »
    Greengearz, as Feu said don't worry too much about whether to bring someone with you or not. Although it's certainly useful and some doctors will want you to, it's not essential by any means. The important thing is that they are able to get an accurate account of what you were like and how things were for you growing up. You might find it helpful to write out notes for yourself in advance of things you remember as a child or even to ask your parents to write a short letter for you.

    I know what you mean not wanting to bring a parent who doesn't think it's real. That can be very frustrating. That phrase always amuses me though. Nobody believes in ADHD as belief has absolutely nothing to do with it. It is not some quasi religious belief. It's a scientific and empirical reality. A neurobiological developmental condition which is approx 80% heritable. About as heritable as height is!

    The poster above mentioned that they may still be able to accurately give an account of things but I think I'd have to disagree to some extent. People who say they "don't believe in ADHD" generally exhibit all the features of science denialism. They typically deny certain realities, often as a way to avoid a psychologically uncomfortable truth. [In the context of Adult ADHD, perhaps this might be guilt at not getting a child help earlier or moralistic societal views in relation to lazyness, hard work etc that clash with the reality of ADHD and genetics. Cognitive dissonance is a powerful thing!

    The above may not be relevant to you but I reckon it's worth thinking about if you find that a parent has a rather different version of what things were like for you as a child or the difficulties you experienced/ are experiencing! Having a close family member invalidate your experiences like that can be very damaging and so that's why I'd encourage you to follow your own judgement on whether to bring someone with you. Weight the benefits I suppose.

    As it happens, the idea that to have ADHD as an adult you must have had it as a child may not even be true and is possibly just dogma. The current diagnostic criteria require you to have had symptoms before age 12. However, the choice of age 12 is arbitrary and there's lots of evidence that it can manifest for some people into their teens and beyond. The latest research suggests ADHD can actually occur in adulthood for the first time. This is still somewhat controversial but I guess the point is not to worry too much about whether you had it as a child. Many peoples experiences are that difficulties began for them later on.

    Yeah agreed people can have very good structure as children with school, dinner, homework, bed etc. I know my own mother ran a very tight ship. Problems can begin to manifest when the person leaves home for work or college and has to fend for themselves in daily life so to speak and eventually the pressures of adult life can seem overwhelming.

    I wouldn't be concerned about your parents not attending, Fitzgerald would be happy to take a phone call from them if you could get your mother to oblige. Maybe speak to your parents and explain the symptoms that you are struggling with and get them around to the idea that it is a real condition. If not as said earlier I wouldn't involve my parents at all. However it would be strange if you really had no symptoms as a child I would imagine. I definitely did, but since adulthood have suffered from a range a different mental health problems I am trying to get my head around so I am certainly not an expert.

    In any regard he does a full assessment of you and your symptoms so I think he would be happy to base his diagnoses on this. You should bring the checklist I mentioned earlier though.

    Just said I would add my two cents as was only with Fitzgerald last Friday.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30 Greengearz


    Thanks guys for all your helpful replies.

    Re about symptoms in childhood, I was quite an active, hyper child, but more so in the spirited 'livewire' sense, not a trouble maker or anything like that. Up until U was 8 or 9 I did various activities such as ballet and many instruments, so I was kept occupied & busy. Then I lived in the countryside with many trees to climb and animals and dogs to mind. Even in secondary though I didn't study for any exams and I left essays etc to the last minute/class before.

    I remember several times when I was at a friends house and my mum would come to collect me, I would go running around my friends house and try not to go home because I was having fun, much to my more calmer friend's surprise.

    My Dad remembers a time when I was locked in the boot (estate car) as I was showing my younger sister how to mess my Dad's room up by pulling all of his clothes out of his wardrobe!

    Thing is I get very very giddy sometimes, esp with friends, during secondary school although I was known for being very intelligent I was moved to a different seat on many occasion for talking and giggling.

    Even now in college, I can get very hyper and giggly/loud very fast (and it doesn't seem to be linked to whether I have chocolate or whatever, I generally eat quite clean anyway). Not just one or two laughter but what feels like manic laughter sometimes when anything becomes funny.

    It's the distraction/indecisiveness & procrastination that's probably the most annoying, I started writing this reply well over an hour ago. (around 8:15pm-
    now 10pm) I'm a very fast typer once I get started and I theoretically should have it typed out in 10 or s minutes as I read the replies earlier and knew what I was going to say. However once again everything on or off the laptop catches my focus which leads to further tangents.

    Often it's a random bout of singing, I tend to sing quite alot however I often lose focus halfway through a song lol

    I'm not that impatient as a person, say in queues and the like. However in terms of waiting for replies to emails or on forums then yeah I do have a habit of refreshing quite alot.

    My fast pace of talking also is an issue, even having a conversation with a lecturer or class mate, I feel like I trip over my words constantly and sometimes makes no sense. (In my head It's fine). Presentations are an epic fail as even trying to make prompt cards is hard as I cant get the order of them right and I'd keep redoing them, if that even makes sense. (Most recent presentation I was preparing the prompt cards while waiting to be called to do my presentation, that's how last minute I leave things)
    Another presentation I sat there laughing for a good 5 minutes, no idea why.

    Although I like mornings, motivating myself to get up early in time to have breakfast etc My bus comes at 7:40, I've many a time gotten out of bed at 7:35 and gotten the bus just fine but I never have time for breakfast, just a quick cup of tea, and my mother normally makes that as she's already up (and makes one for my sister too). No matter where i put my phone or how many alarms in quick succession I have, I snooze every one, irrelevant of how much sleep I get. Today was the second day of 4hrs sleep and I've been on my feet all day since 7 and I'm still as energetic as ever. I feel like I could jump up and down or go for a sprint or something lol

    @MrSzyslak The €350, does that all have to be paid in the one go/in advance? I'm going to to try and speak to my mother/dad about ADHD in adults and just gauge their reaction first, my mum's the kind of person who doesn't even admit to getting a simple common cold and although I have asked what I was like as a child, I can't get any proper answers...yet. Hoping ti see y report cards some day soon from primary school.

    They've gone missing at the moment, my mother is just as if not messier then I am and loses things quite a lot. She also has a very short temper which dissipates very quickly. I'm not sure would I want her to come with me as I'd be worried she'd (perhaps) deliberately contradict me or play it down saying 'all kids are like that'.

    Having a letter written by both parents might be a better option as at least they can't change their story to suit the questions asked. My sister might be a better option as she knows how messy and loud/hyper I am/can be. However I'm not sure what she thinks of this subject, I've mentioned it to her a few times. I was actually pointing out how many symptoms mum could potentially have and she was basically like "that's her to a T, wow" etc


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Seanachai wrote: »
    Is Tyvense covered under the drugs payment scheme or is it on special order?
    I cant answer that for you I'm afraid, its probably up to the psychiatrists discretion and whether its available in Ireland.
    I Know its used for adults with adhd in the UK.

    My two cents on "adult onset adhd" - I think its even a concept because a lot of the times you have sturucture as a child and young adult - when you have to have your own structure and self discipline - thats when things get hairy.

    If treated for adhd as a child - the skills lacking in adhd are dealt with early on, like autism etc.
    When it is missed and goes untreated the adhd finally gets picked up - no previous help and **** falls apart.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 226 ✭✭MrSzyslak


    Greengearz wrote: »
    Thanks guys for all your helpful replies.

    Re about symptoms in childhood, I was quite an active, hyper child, but more so in the spirited 'livewire' sense, not a trouble maker or anything like that. Up until U was 8 or 9 I did various activities such as ballet and many instruments, so I was kept occupied & busy. Then I lived in the countryside with many trees to climb and animals and dogs to mind. Even in secondary though I didn't study for any exams and I left essays etc to the last minute/class before.

    I remember several times when I was at a friends house and my mum would come to collect me, I would go running around my friends house and try not to go home because I was having fun, much to my more calmer friend's surprise.

    My Dad remembers a time when I was locked in the boot (estate car) as I was showing my younger sister how to mess my Dad's room up by pulling all of his clothes out of his wardrobe!

    Thing is I get very very giddy sometimes, esp with friends, during secondary school although I was known for being very intelligent I was moved to a different seat on many occasion for talking and giggling.

    Even now in college, I can get very hyper and giggly/loud very fast (and it doesn't seem to be linked to whether I have chocolate or whatever, I generally eat quite clean anyway). Not just one or two laughter but what feels like manic laughter sometimes when anything becomes funny.

    It's the distraction/indecisiveness & procrastination that's probably the most annoying, I started writing this reply well over an hour ago. (around 8:15pm-
    now 10pm) I'm a very fast typer once I get started and I theoretically should have it typed out in 10 or s minutes as I read the replies earlier and knew what I was going to say. However once again everything on or off the laptop catches my focus which leads to further tangents.

    Often it's a random bout of singing, I tend to sing quite alot however I often lose focus halfway through a song lol

    I'm not that impatient as a person, say in queues and the like. However in terms of waiting for replies to emails or on forums then yeah I do have a habit of refreshing quite alot.

    My fast pace of talking also is an issue, even having a conversation with a lecturer or class mate, I feel like I trip over my words constantly and sometimes makes no sense. (In my head It's fine). Presentations are an epic fail as even trying to make prompt cards is hard as I cant get the order of them right and I'd keep redoing them, if that even makes sense. (Most recent presentation I was preparing the prompt cards while waiting to be called to do my presentation, that's how last minute I leave things)
    Another presentation I sat there laughing for a good 5 minutes, no idea why.

    Although I like mornings, motivating myself to get up early in time to have breakfast etc My bus comes at 7:40, I've many a time gotten out of bed at 7:35 and gotten the bus just fine but I never have time for breakfast, just a quick cup of tea, and my mother normally makes that as she's already up (and makes one for my sister too). No matter where i put my phone or how many alarms in quick succession I have, I snooze every one, irrelevant of how much sleep I get. Today was the second day of 4hrs sleep and I've been on my feet all day since 7 and I'm still as energetic as ever. I feel like I could jump up and down or go for a sprint or something lol

    @MrSzyslak The €350, does that all have to be paid in the one go/in advance? I'm going to to try and speak to my mother/dad about ADHD in adults and just gauge their reaction first, my mum's the kind of person who doesn't even admit to getting a simple common cold and although I have asked what I was like as a child, I can't get any proper answers...yet. Hoping ti see y report cards some day soon from primary school.

    They've gone missing at the moment, my mother is just as if not messier then I am and loses things quite a lot. She also has a very short temper which dissipates very quickly. I'm not sure would I want her to come with me as I'd be worried she'd (perhaps) deliberately contradict me or play it down saying 'all kids are like that'.

    Having a letter written by both parents might be a better option as at least they can't change their story to suit the questions asked. My sister might be a better option as she knows how messy and loud/hyper I am/can be. However I'm not sure what she thinks of this subject, I've mentioned it to her a few times. I was actually pointing out how many symptoms mum could potentially have and she was basically like "that's her to a T, wow" etc

    Yup all in one go unfortunately it's a big wack of cash I was only in there around 35 minutes. To be fair he had the report back to me in a few days which was good service. He's a specialist with god now's how many years experience you pay for their time.

    From reading your post you seem to have many examples of ADHD from childhood.

    I would just suggest someone to back up your issues it might not be vital, I'm not sure, but it should make the report more credible as he will note how he assessed you on the report.

    Just to add if you are college age as in recently came from school it may be seen as more important for you to have a parent involved. For example I have been out of school 12 years and had many examples of switching college courses and it hindering jobs in a professional capacity, as a previous poster said maybe ring up and inquire with his PA/or nurse not sure, I'm sure she's knowledable on the process

    All the best with it. Feel free to PM me if you've any questions before the appointment.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,540 ✭✭✭Seanachai


    cannex wrote: »
    I cant answer that for you I'm afraid, its probably up to the psychiatrists discretion and whether its available in Ireland.
    I Know its used for adults with adhd in the UK.

    My two cents on "adult onset adhd" - I think its even a concept because a lot of the times you have sturucture as a child and young adult - when you have to have your own structure and self discipline - thats when things get hairy.

    If treated for adhd as a child - the skills lacking in adhd are dealt with early on, like autism etc.
    When it is missed and goes untreated the adhd finally gets picked up - no previous help and **** falls apart.

    There is a childlike element that I've noticed in adhd people that I know, in myself too, but I'm inside the picture so I can't say how much. It could be a developmental deficit of some sort or maybe it's perfectly normal and the issue is that it just doesn't suit the modern world.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,655 ✭✭✭Royal Legend


    Interesting program on BBC last night with Comedian Rory Bremner looking into if he had ADHD, (turned out he has)
    Well worth a look, but some of the theory around people who have ADHD was pretty scary.
    p.s. I have a son (adult now) that was diagnosed when they was 16 years old. As well as that, from my own experience with my son i would not advocate any form of medication to remedy any situation. my son had side effects, loss of appetite and palpitations, school thought it was great though as he had calmed down, I also thought that it did take away part of his personality. Personally think it is too easy to prescribe drugs whether for this or depression to children, seriously wrong IMO.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,540 ✭✭✭Seanachai


    Interesting program on BBC last night with Comedian Rory Bremner looking into if he had ADHD, (turned out he has)
    Well worth a look, but some of the theory around people who have ADHD was pretty scary.
    p.s. I have a son (adult now) that was diagnosed when they was 16 years old. As well as that, from my own experience with my son i would not advocate any form of medication to remedy any situation. my son had side effects, loss of appetite and palpitations, school thought it was great though as he had calmed down, I also thought that it did take away part of his personality. Personally think it is too easy to prescribe drugs whether for this or depression to children, seriously wrong IMO.

    Have you ever researched vitamin and mineral deficiencies caused by malabsorption issues? I'm not giving medical advice but if he was willing you could try one of the clinics that are offering IV vitamins, it won't do any harm and it could provide benefit without the side effects of the meds.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30 Greengearz


    MrSzyslak wrote: »
    Yup all in one go unfortunately it's a big wack of cash I was only in there around 35 minutes. To be fair he had the report back to me in a few days which was good service. He's a specialist with god now's how many years experience you pay for their time.

    From reading your post you seem to have many examples of ADHD from childhood.

    I would just suggest someone to back up your issues it might not be vital, I'm not sure, but it should make the report more credible as he will note how he assessed you on the report.

    Just to add if you are college age as in recently came from school it may be seen as more important for you to have a parent involved. For example I have been out of school 12 years and had many examples of switching college courses and it hindering jobs in a professional capacity, as a previous poster said maybe ring up and inquire with his PA/or nurse not sure, I'm sure she's knowledgeable on the process

    All the best with it. Feel free to PM me if you've any questions before the appointment.


    @MrSzyslak Thanks, I'm going to email his office later on. I prefer email to talking because I talk so fast and I'd be afraid I'd blank an forget half the stuff I wanted to say. (Although the about could be a good thing too, even his secretary would hear how fast I talk lol)
    I know you said the money is all in one go, is it paid on the day or in advance?

    These past few weeks have been particularly stressful and all can be related to my 'symptoms'
    disorganisation, struggling to get up in the morning to the point where I've bought food for lunch but then don't have time to make lunch, and motivating myself to make my lunch the night before is a huge struggle despite being up until 2am! Still not that tired, despite the lack of sleep & losing things, finance management (or complete lack of), procrastination (7 reports for college now overdue) & the thought of deferring even crossed my mind. I've spent a around 20 hours o the laptop in the evening the past few evenings and I only manged to get 3 or 4 lines done last night of one.

    Spoke to my mum again earlier, haven't yet mentioned ADHD as I know what her reply will be so I'm more probing her for examples of hyperactivity and the like.

    Apparently I was constantly following people and asking questions, When I was 2 or 3 (or 4 not sure) I would take all the food cans out of the cupboard.
    When my mum was having a scan when she was pregnant w/my brother. I took a roll of the blue paper towel stuff and spread it everywhere. The more I think though I can think of times where I exhibited hyperactive behaviour (even at a funeral when I was 15 I remember being very bouncy and giggly/loud).

    I finished school around 6yrs ago now. I started my original course, left spontaneously and returned 2 yrs later after working for a bit. I've quit my job a few times and returned, even now the urge crops up a lot, and I couldn't never explain why I wanted to leave so frequently,despite enjoying it for the most part.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,540 ✭✭✭Seanachai


    Greengearz wrote: »
    @MrSzyslak Thanks, I'm going to email his office later on. I prefer email to talking because I talk so fast and I'd be afraid I'd blank an forget half the stuff I wanted to say. (Although the about could be a good thing too, even his secretary would hear how fast I talk lol)
    I know you said the money is all in one go, is it paid on the day or in advance?

    These past few weeks have been particularly stressful and all can be related to my 'symptoms'
    disorganisation, struggling to get up in the morning to the point where I've bought food for lunch but then don't have time to make lunch, and motivating myself to make my lunch the night before is a huge struggle despite being up until 2am! Still not that tired, despite the lack of sleep & losing things, finance management (or complete lack of), procrastination (7 reports for college now overdue) & the thought of deferring even crossed my mind. I've spent a around 20 hours o the laptop in the evening the past few evenings and I only manged to get 3 or 4 lines done last night of one.

    Spoke to my mum again earlier, haven't yet mentioned ADHD as I know what her reply will be so I'm more probing her for examples of hyperactivity and the like.

    Apparently I was constantly following people and asking questions, When I was 2 or 3 (or 4 not sure) I would take all the food cans out of the cupboard.
    When my mum was having a scan when she was pregnant w/my brother. I took a roll of the blue paper towel stuff and spread it everywhere. The more I think though I can think of times where I exhibited hyperactive behaviour (even at a funeral when I was 15 I remember being very bouncy and giggly/loud).

    I finished school around 6yrs ago now. I started my original course, left spontaneously and returned 2 yrs later after working for a bit. I've quit my job a few times and returned, even now the urge crops up a lot, and I couldn't never explain why I wanted to leave so frequently,despite enjoying it for the most part.

    I realise that you are looking for comprehensive help, there's a small thing that has helped me though. I have to use computer screens all day and the non prescription glasses below have helped me as the blue light from monitors and office lighting may exacerbate ADHD.


    http://www.zennioptical.com/beyond-uv-blue-blocker


  • Registered Users Posts: 30 Greengearz


    Okay thank you, I'll look into them. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 30 Greengearz


    So I've been in contact with proff fitzgerald and I have an appointment for a months time, can't believe how fast and how easy it was to get am appointment. (Vs going through my gp/hse).
    He'll also take written statements from my parents if they can't attend.

    So obviously now I have an appointment I'm starting to doubt myself, I think it's the cost, just hoping it won't be a waste, so to speak.

    Just to recap an summarize, these are the main reasons why, I think they are valid.

    -procrastination in all areas, esp. College work.
    -every single assignment either late or unfinished.... I more then likely will he repeating next semester as I've 5 reports not handed in.
    -never studied successfully for a single exam
    -easily distracted
    -hyperfocusing on areas that interest me or just things I get stuck on.
    -loses things all the Time
    -extremely messy (esp my room and 'study' desk.
    -can be very hyper sometimes
    -very fast pace of speech, often trips over words.
    - find it quite hard to get up and out of bed, probably related to the fact I don't normally get more then 6hrs Sleep. I can function seemingly ok on very little but do crash some evenings, especially after a day that requires a lot of thinking and concentration (e.g. work).
    With all the above said, I managed to get 7.5hrs sleep last night, woke up 3 times.
    -can get easily frustrated sometimes.

    I have evidence of childhood behaviour and a possible family link (not diagnosed,just my own observation)

    Anyway I think these are all valid symptoms that could warrant an adhd assessment, do you guys agree?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,540 ✭✭✭Seanachai


    Greengearz wrote: »
    So I've been in contact with proff fitzgerald and I have an appointment for a months time, can't believe how fast and how easy it was to get am appointment. (Vs going through my gp/hse).
    He'll also take written statements from my parents if they can't attend.

    So obviously now I have an appointment I'm starting to doubt myself, I think it's the cost, just hoping it won't be a waste, so to speak.

    Just to recap an summarize, these are the main reasons why, I think they are valid.

    -procrastination in all areas, esp. College work.
    -every single assignment either late or unfinished.... I more then likely will he repeating next semester as I've 5 reports not handed in.
    -never studied successfully for a single exam
    -easily distracted
    -hyperfocusing on areas that interest me or just things I get stuck on.
    -loses things all the Time
    -extremely messy (esp my room and 'study' desk.
    -can be very hyper sometimes
    -very fast pace of speech, often trips over words.
    - find it quite hard to get up and out of bed, probably related to the fact I don't normally get more then 6hrs Sleep. I can function seemingly ok on very little but do crash some evenings, especially after a day that requires a lot of thinking and concentration (e.g. work).
    With all the above said, I managed to get 7.5hrs sleep last night, woke up 3 times.
    -can get easily frustrated sometimes.

    I have evidence of childhood behaviour and a possible family link (not diagnosed,just my own observation)

    Anyway I think these are all valid symptoms that could warrant an adhd assessment, do you guys agree?

    I have most of those symptoms, I don't lack energy or motivation, I have what Dr Russell Barkley would call an executive dysfunction. I have lots of ideas and understand things I just can't apply myself to virtually anything, or if I do, it's stop-start.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3 saoirse01


    Hi all,

    Just found this thread after searching for something like it for days! So it has been long-suspected that my dad (now 60) has had ADHD since childhood, it has become a major issue in the last two years as his behaviour is affecting our family life. He will say himself that he was "giddy" and "hyperactive" as a child and at 13 was brought to be tested for an overactive thyroid in an attempt to explain why, this was ultimately inconclusive. He struggled with school in every subject except for Art and Sport, and since 18 he has had over 25 different jobs; he has always struggled, to quote him "dodging one crisis after another". He has always been hyperactive, disorganised, impulsive, anxious, inappropriate in some social situations and is constantly going, he has endless amounts of energy and I can safely say in all of my 21 years I have never seen him relaxed or truly calm. In the past 2-3 years it's become progressively worse and now everyone in my house has a major issue in trying to communicate accurately with him as he does not listen whatsoever. It got to breaking point just last week as I genuinely cannot have a proper conversation with me about my future, I am just finishing my undergrad degree and just got offered a Masters in Law last week, I told him this and his reaction was bizarre. He says things every minute of the day that he does not think about, he's been lectured about this his entire life and it never has improved. My Mum tried to get him to go for ADHD testing about 15 years ago as it is exhausting for her juggling the household day-to-day with barely any help from him as he doesn't seen to be physically or mentally capable of helping. Obviously he never went to get assessed. We are desperate for him to get assessed as it would change his, and our lives, if something came of it. We all sat down and told him he had to get this checked out, he had a doctor's appointment yesterday to discuss it and apparently the doctor is looking for someone to refer him to, our doctor isn't great and we are desperate for him to get help so I'm just wondering if any of you have any advice as to where to go next as our doctor is extremely slow with these things. It's seriously affecting our family and this seems like a last resort to try and help things.

    Any advice would be massively appreciated!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 226 ✭✭MrSzyslak


    saoirse01 wrote: »
    Hi all,

    Just found this thread after searching for something like it for days! So it has been long-suspected that my dad (now 60) has had ADHD since childhood, it has become a major issue in the last two years as his behaviour is affecting our family life. He will say himself that he was "giddy" and "hyperactive" as a child and at 13 was brought to be tested for an overactive thyroid in an attempt to explain why, this was ultimately inconclusive. He struggled with school in every subject except for Art and Sport, and since 18 he has had over 25 different jobs; he has always struggled, to quote him "dodging one crisis after another". He has always been hyperactive, disorganised, impulsive, anxious, inappropriate in some social situations and is constantly going, he has endless amounts of energy and I can safely say in all of my 21 years I have never seen him relaxed or truly calm. In the past 2-3 years it's become progressively worse and now everyone in my house has a major issue in trying to communicate accurately with him as he does not listen whatsoever. It got to breaking point just last week as I genuinely cannot have a proper conversation with me about my future, I am just finishing my undergrad degree and just got offered a Masters in Law last week, I told him this and his reaction was bizarre. He says things every minute of the day that he does not think about, he's been lectured about this his entire life and it never has improved. My Mum tried to get him to go for ADHD testing about 15 years ago as it is exhausting for her juggling the household day-to-day with barely any help from him as he doesn't seen to be physically or mentally capable of helping. Obviously he never went to get assessed. We are desperate for him to get assessed as it would change his, and our lives, if something came of it. We all sat down and told him he had to get this checked out, he had a doctor's appointment yesterday to discuss it and apparently the doctor is looking for someone to refer him to, our doctor isn't great and we are desperate for him to get help so I'm just wondering if any of you have any advice as to where to go next as our doctor is extremely slow with these things. It's seriously affecting our family and this seems like a last resort to try and help things.

    Any advice would be massively appreciated!

    Hi, I can see how that would cause problems for everyone involved there must be a whole host of people at your father's age undiagnosed.

    I would say the best avenue is to have a chat with his GP and tell them he made an appointment to see Michael Fitzgerald. He will put him on medication that should be very helpful and recommend some therapy specifically for Adhd in adults. It's Dr David Carey in D18. It's expensive but the quickest option. As GP's and the HSE don't really seem to acknowledge ADHD in adults.

    Best of luck! Some one else might add more to this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    saoirse01 wrote: »
    Hi all,

    Just found this thread after searching for something like it for days! So it has been long-suspected that my dad (now 60) has had ADHD since childhood, it has become a major issue in the last two years as his behaviour is affecting our family life. He will say himself that he was "giddy" and "hyperactive" as a child and at 13 was brought to be tested for an overactive thyroid in an attempt to explain why, this was ultimately inconclusive. He struggled with school in every subject except for Art and Sport, and since 18 he has had over 25 different jobs; he has always struggled, to quote him "dodging one crisis after another". He has always been hyperactive, disorganised, impulsive, anxious, inappropriate in some social situations and is constantly going, he has endless amounts of energy and I can safely say in all of my 21 years I have never seen him relaxed or truly calm. In the past 2-3 years it's become progressively worse and now everyone in my house has a major issue in trying to communicate accurately with him as he does not listen whatsoever. It got to breaking point just last week as I genuinely cannot have a proper conversation with me about my future, I am just finishing my undergrad degree and just got offered a Masters in Law last week, I told him this and his reaction was bizarre. He says things every minute of the day that he does not think about, he's been lectured about this his entire life and it never has improved. My Mum tried to get him to go for ADHD testing about 15 years ago as it is exhausting for her juggling the household day-to-day with barely any help from him as he doesn't seen to be physically or mentally capable of helping. Obviously he never went to get assessed. We are desperate for him to get assessed as it would change his, and our lives, if something came of it. We all sat down and told him he had to get this checked out, he had a doctor's appointment yesterday to discuss it and apparently the doctor is looking for someone to refer him to, our doctor isn't great and we are desperate for him to get help so I'm just wondering if any of you have any advice as to where to go next as our doctor is extremely slow with these things. It's seriously affecting our family and this seems like a last resort to try and help things.

    Any advice would be massively appreciated!

    ADHD has a massive impact on everyone close to the person with ADHD. Massive negative consequenses. TO be honest with you I dont think your father would have been taken seriously if he went to be seen years ago.

    HE does not need to be referred by your doctor so rest assured he will not have to rely on a rubbish dr.
    He can make an appointment with Prof Fitzgerald - privately.

    Do so as soon as possible, it can change his life and your whole family!!!

    http://professormichaelfitzgerald.eu/consulting-room/


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    MrSzyslak wrote: »
    Hi, I can see how that would cause problems for everyone involved there must be a whole host of people at your father's age undiagnosed.

    I would say the best avenue is to have a chat with his GP and tell them he made an appointment to see Michael Fitzgerald. He will put him on medication that should be very helpful and recommend some therapy specifically for Adhd in adults. It's Dr David Carey in D18. It's expensive but the quickest option. As GP's and the HSE don't really seem to acknowledge ADHD in adults.

    Best of luck! Some one else might add more to this.

    Thanks for replying - do you have a website link to this Dr in D8?
    If so could you please post it?
    The more we can collect details that can help others the better - I'd say Fitzgerald is becoming inundated already just from this thread LOL

    :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭Feu


    http://www.davidjcarey.com/ , based in Stillorgan, he's a clinical psychologist. He does a segment on Moncrieff on newstalk, from what i hear from people who have met with him, he is great!

    Dr Carey can also diagnose ADHD (as well as Fitzgerald), but cannot prescribe medication as he is not a doctor doctor


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    Feu wrote: »
    http://www.davidjcarey.com/ , based in Stillorgan, he's a clinical psychologist. He does a segment on Moncrieff on newstalk, from what i hear from people who have met with him, he is great!

    Dr Carey can also diagnose ADHD (as well as Fitzgerald), but cannot prescribe medication as he is not a doctor doctor

    Ok fair enough, just to be clear, if he's a clinical psychologist that means he can write a letter recommending what medication is suitable? And then the family dr takes his written note/prescription and prints out what is written on the note, ie - what medication is recommended?


  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭Feu


    cannex wrote: »
    Ok fair enough, just to be clear, if he's a clinical psychologist that means he can write a letter recommending what medication is suitable? And then the family dr takes his written note/prescription and prints out what is written on the note, ie - what medication is recommended?

    it is my understanding, no, he can't recommend medication. A GP may prescribe on the basis of his diagnosis, but the person may need to go to a psychiatrist to get the prescription. This is a more convoluted way of doing things obviously, but Dr Carey is very thorough, and would meet with the person 2-3 times, so the diagnosis is very accurate. You would also get more detailed report than with Fitzgerald. Dr Carey can also be seen for ADHD counselling


  • Registered Users Posts: 3 saoirse01


    Thank you all for your speedy replies! I really appreciate it!

    I have just googled Prof. Fitzgerald there and he seems like an excellent option, my dad is in work until 6pm but I will get him to give him a call in the morning. I think it's definitely the time to look for help, my dad is ready to help himself first.

    Thanks again!


  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    saoirse01 wrote: »
    Thank you all for your speedy replies! I really appreciate it!

    I have just googled Prof. Fitzgerald there and he seems like an excellent option, my dad is in work until 6pm but I will get him to give him a call in the morning. I think it's definitely the time to look for help, my dad is ready to help himself first.

    Thanks again!

    Brilliant, its hard to live with it and to be aware of all the disappointments it causes for the ones you love.

    Be aware that the office only answers calls on certain days and only in the morning.
    Best of luck for your dad and family :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3 saoirse01


    Thanks again!

    Also, just one more thing, we genuinely believe that the only thing that will help my dad is medication, anything like CBT or any sort of therapy advice he cannot stick to for longer than 20 minutes, he is just worried that it will "change his personality". He's very outgoing and is always up for a laugh and loves how much energy he has to walk 10k a day, cut down a tree in the garden, paint a picture and play golf! If any of you have experience with medication does this happen? What is it like to be on medication, is it a huge noticeable difference to you or those around you?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 124 ✭✭cannex


    saoirse01 wrote: »
    Thanks again!

    Also, just one more thing, we genuinely believe that the only thing that will help my dad is medication, anything like CBT or any sort of therapy advice he cannot stick to for longer than 20 minutes, he is just worried that it will "change his personality". He's very outgoing and is always up for a laugh and loves how much energy he has to walk 10k a day, cut down a tree in the garden, paint a picture and play golf! If any of you have experience with medication does this happen? What is it like to be on medication, is it a huge noticeable difference to you or those around you?

    Having ADHD means that sticking to anything at all is hard. That is why it is advised for people to not do CBT until the person is getting the right treatment - ie medications.

    The meds dont change a persons personality. I am still the same person, the difference is that I can control my behaviour and reactions when medicated. I can now hold down a job.

    One expert psychologist on ADHD met me one day with the HSE (the only one who believed me) and he said something that still sticks with me to this day. He said (and I agree wholeheartedly), having the right therapeutic dose is like putting on a pair of glasses. You can finally focus. When I got used to the meds the difference is night and day, not to mention the impact my being diagnosed and getting treatment has done for my ability to manage my life in general.

    Try not to jump the gun and take it one step at a time.
    You can tell your dad that he will still be the same person.
    Be warned this is a journey that only begins with being diagnosed.
    The rest of the journey is getting the medication right and getting CBT that is SPECIFICALLY for ADHD.
    After that he will have the tools.
    It takes time and he already has a massive advantage in that he has a loving family who firstly believe ADHD is real and he wants to help himself.

    By the way, medication PLUS CBT is the advised treatment - taking medication alone does not change anything at all as he will still have the same bad habits. CBT changes the old thinking patterns, looks at the old coping mechanisms and looks at ways he can make small changes for himself.
    Any more questions just ask.


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