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**Carbon Monoxide Awareness**

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  • 30-11-2014 9:06pm
    #1
    Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭


    For more information:
    http://www.carbonmonoxide.ie
    Post edited by Wearb on


«134

Comments

  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    What is Carbon Monoxide (CO)

    Carbon Monoxide (also known as CO) is a colourless, odourless poisonous gas and is a common yet preventable cause of death from poisoning worldwide. Approximately half of the deaths from unintentional CO poisonings result from the inhalation of smoke from fires. Other significant causes are vehicle exhausts and deaths in industrial / commercial settings. On average between 1 and 2 people die each year in Ireland from unintentional CO poisoning in the home in incidents related to domestic heating or other fossil fuel installations in the home (i.e. excluding the inhalation of smoke from fires).

    The incomplete combustion of organic fossil fuels such as oil, gas or coal is a common environmental source of CO and is responsible for many cases of non-fatal unintentional CO poisoning.

    In normal conditions the combustion process (the addition of oxygen) will result in carbon in the fossil fuel, combining with oxygen, in the air, to produce Carbon Dioxide (CO2), the same substance we exhale when we breathe.

    However, if there is a lack of air for the combustion process or the heating appliance is faulty, Carbon Monoxide can be produced.

    When CO is inhaled into the body it combines with the blood, preventing it from absorbing oxygen. If a person is exposed to CO over a period, it can cause illness and even death.

    Carbon Monoxide has no smell, taste or colour. This is why it is sometimes called the "Silent Killer".

    Carbon Monoxide alarms can be used as a backup to provide a warning to householders in the event of a dangerous build up of CO. Check that the Carbon Monoxide alarm complies with the EN 50291 standard. Remember that Carbon Monoxide alarms are no substitute for regular inspection and maintenance of appliances, vents, flues and chimneys.


  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    Safety Precautions

    Ensure your appliances are correctly installed and SERVICED ANNUALLY
    Ensure that rooms in your home containing heating appliances are properly ventilated - NEVER BLOCK VENTS
    Make sure all chimneys are regularly swept and kept clear
    Use appliances only for the PURPOSE for which they were designed, e.g. do not use a cooker to heat a room
    NEVER use any appliance if you suspect it might be faulty
    If undertaking ALTERATIONS to your home which may affect the safety or efficiency of your heating installation (e.g. adding an extension, converting a garage, removing internal walls, changing a living room into a bedroom, double glazing / weather sealed doors) follow this safety advice:
    Do not block or build around any existing air vents or flues
    If creating a new living space, ensure it has ventilation in accordance with Building Regulations
    If adding additional radiators ensure that your boiler can cope with the additional capacity
    If you are altering or adding appliances to a natural gas or LPG installation, ensure that work is carried out to IS813:2002 Domestic Gas Installations
    Get professional advice on ventilation and flueing before embarking on alterations to your house. Contact your fuel supplier for details of qualified personnel
    Use Carbon Monoxide alarms but remember these are no substitute for regular inspection and maintenance of appliances, vents, flues and chimneys. Check that the Carbon Monoxide alarm complies with the EN 50291 standard.
    Natural Gas

    Choose room-sealed appliances. With room-sealed appliances fresh air intake for combustion comes from outside of the house and emissions are then discharged outside also. As such, the air in the room where the appliance is fitted is not used or affected by the appliance. Therefore room-sealed appliances (balanced flue or fanned draught types) are recommended for new and replacement boilers and water heaters.

    Do you have an unsafe water heater?
    Flueless gas water heaters are considered dangerous because they consume the air inside the room. This causes the products of combustion - including toxic Carbon Monoxide - to discharge directly into the room where the heater is fitted. If used for extended periods, the levels of Carbon Monoxide can build up to dangerous levels if there is a lack of ventilation. Open flue-type water heaters located in bathrooms are also considered unsafe. If you think you may have an unsafe gas waterheater contact Bord Gáis Networks now on 1850 79 79 79 for a free safety check.

    Do you have a gas boiler which previously ran on oil?
    In the past, existing oil boilers were modified to operate on natural gas. This was achieved by replacing the oil burner on the unit with a gas burner, with the old boiler casing and heat exchanger being retained. If you think you might have such an appliance contact Bord Gáis Networks on 1850 79 79 79 for a free safety check.

    NEVER use any appliance if you suspect it might be faulty. Have it checked. If you require a safety check of your natural gas installation phone 1850 79 79 79.
    For new installations or alterations to existing installation always use a Registered Gas Installer.


  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Causes of CO Poisoning

    You can be in danger of Carbon Monoxide poisoning at home if dangerous amounts of Carbon Monoxide accumulate in the home. This can happen as a result of any or a combination of the following:

    Faulty or damaged heating appliances
    Heating appliance not maintained or serviced
    Rooms not properly ventilated
    Blocked chimneys or flues
    Indoor use of a barbecue grill or outdoor heater
    Poor installation of heating appliances
    Improper operation of heating appliances
    Property alterations or home improvements, which reduce ventilation
    Running engines such as vehicles or lawnmowers in garages
    Using cooking appliances for heating purposes
    Symptoms of CO Poisoning

    Symptoms of Carbon Monoxide poisoning can be similar to those caused by other illnesses such as a cold or flu. They include

    Unexplained headaches, chest pains or muscular weakness
    Sickness, diarrhoea or stomach pains
    Sudden dizziness when standing up
    General lethargy
    What to Do?

    If anyone in your house has any of the symptoms outlined above get fresh air immediately, then go to your doctor and ask him/her to check for Carbon Monoxide poisoning.

    Stop using the appliance immediately and do not use it again until it has been checked by a registered installer or a qualified service agent.

    The amount of CO which the blood absorbs depends chiefly on two things: how much CO is in the air and the time of the exposure. Adverse effects of CO on humans are reduced by periods of breathing fresh air. The degree of recovery depends on the number and length of those periods. The general state of health and degree of physical activity of a person exposed to CO are other factors involved in the effects of Carbon Monoxide on the body.

    Physiological Effects of Carbon Monoxide (CO)
    Parts per Million Time of Exposure Response
    50 Threshold limit, no apparent toxic symptoms
    100 Several hours No symptoms for long periods
    200 2-3 hours Possible headache
    400 1-2 hours Frontal headache and nausea
    800 45 minutes Headache, dizziness and nausea
    800 2 hours Collapse and possible unconsciousness
    1600 20 minutes Headache, dizziness and nausea
    1600 2 hours Collapse, unconsciousness, possible death
    3200 5-10 minutes Headache and dizziness
    3200 10-15 minutes Unconsciousness and possible death
    6400 1-2 minutes Headache and dizziness
    6400 0-15 minutes Unconsciousness and possible death
    12800 Immediate Unconsciousness
    12800 1-3 minutes Danger of death
    If you or your family experience symptoms and you believe CO may be involved you should seek urgent medical advice. Inform your doctor of your concerns. CO will leave the blood when you go out into the fresh air and tests for CO may be inaccurate if taken hours after the exposure has ceased.

    Again, if you find a person ill or unconscious near any fuel burning appliance, be careful in case you also become a casualty. Get fresh air immediately by opening windows and doors.


  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    Advice on Appliances

    Oil, Gas and Solid fuel Appliances
    When buying an oil or gas appliance, deal with a reputable outlet. Every new appliance is supplied with a full instruction book, essential to the correct and safe use of the appliance. Insist that the appliance installer gives you an instruction book. Read it carefully and get to know your appliance. Keep the instructions handy. If you are moving house leave the instruction book for any appliance you are not taking with you (contact your appliance supplier if you need a replacement instruction book).

    All appliances should be serviced and checked for safety annually to make sure they are working safely and efficiently. If you're concerned that an appliance is not operating safely, or that the installation in your house is not in good condition or unsafe then have a safety inspection conducted.

    Barbecues
    Barbecues have been linked to campsite deaths caused by carbon monoxide poisoning. If you're planning on using a barbecue, whether it's a disposable one, gas or charcoal make sure you keep yourself safe and don't put yourself at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. Follow these top tips for barbecue safety:

    Never take a smouldering or lit barbecue into a tent, caravan or cabin. Even if you have finished cooking your barbecue should remain outside as it will still give off fumes for some hours after use.
    Never use a barbecue inside to keep you warm.
    Never leave a lit barbecue unattended or while sleeping.
    Only use appliances in accordance with the operating instructions.
    Place your cooking area well away from your tent. Always ensure there is an adequate supply of fresh air where the barbecue is being used.
    Mobile Gas Heaters (L.P.G.)
    The use of mobile heaters which are damaged can result in the production of Carbon Monoxide. In particular if the plaques or bricks at the front of the heater are damaged, or the retaining cement is missing, they should be immediately replaced by a competent person. The heater should not be used in a damaged condition. For further details on safety checks for mobile gas heaters click here.

    Safety alert on New World Vision gas cookers
    The New World Vision 50TWLMSV (LPG) gas cooker can produce dangerous levels of carbon monoxide if not operated in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. For further information on this and other New Wold Vision 50TWL models affected and the required safety actions click here.

    Safety Alert on certain Beko, Flavel and Leisure gas cookers
    A similar safety alert was issued for certain Beko, Flavel and Leisure cooker models. If the cooker grill is operated with the grill door closed, production of Carbon Monoxide can occur. Not operating these appliances in accordance with the user instructions can pose a serious risk to your health. For further information on arranging a free safety inspection and modification click here.

    Wood Pellet Boilers

    Wood Pellet Boilers are commonly used in homes and businesses as an alternative to the oil or gas fired boilers. Wood pellets, the fuel source for these units are normally housed in a large sealed hopper/tank that is either fitted with screw feeder (auger) connected to the boiler, or the hopper/tank is mounted over the boiler for gravity feeding. Due to the enclosed nature of these hoppers/tanks the atmosphere inside can become oxygen depleted and a toxic atmosphere can accumulate. All operators, maintenance personnel and users of this equipment need to ensure the following;

    DO NOT ENTER or place your head into the wood pellet hopper under any circumstances. The unit can contain toxic gases.
    Ensure that your wood pellet hopper/tank and boiler has been installed and commissioned by a competent person. If in doubt, contact the supplier and/or manufacturer and request assistance.
    Ensure that the boiler is cleaned and serviced by a competent person at the frequency required by the manufacturers’ instructions.
    If any problems are encountered with the unit, such as, system not heating correctly, flue gas is flowing into boiler room, turn unit off and seek assistance immediately.
    No personnel should enter the hopper/tank unless fully trained and competent in confined space entry procedures. The hopper/tank should be fully ventilated and controls put in place to ensure safe entry as per the HSA Code of Practice “Safe Work in Confined Spaces”.
    Ensure boiler room is well ventilated at all times to ensure no inadvertent build up of toxic gases.
    Have your chimney swept regularly?
    Have your chimney swept regularly as they can become blocked over time. The nesting of birds in the chimney may cause a blockage preventing the products of combustion from the fire leaving the building. It is recommended that Crow Guards are fitted on all chimneys with gas fires fitted prior to 1996. These older fire types may not have the additional safety features which turn off the gas fire in such circumstances. Consideration should also be given to the fitting of a Crow Guard for chimneys for solid fuel fires and all fossil fuel appliances connected to an open chimney in order to protect against the blocking of the chimney by nesting birds.

    Natural Gas

    Do you have an unsafe water heater?
    Flueless gas water heaters are considered dangerous because they consume the air inside the room. This causes the products of combustion - including toxic Carbon Monoxide - to discharge directly into the room where the heater is fitted. If used for extended periods, the levels of Carbon Monoxide can build up to dangerous levels if there is a lack of ventilation. Open flue-type water heaters located in bathrooms are also considered unsafe. If you think you may have an unsafe gas waterheater contact Bord Gáis Networks now on 1850 79 79 79 for a free safety check.

    Do you have a gas boiler which previously ran on oil?
    In the past, existing oil boilers were modified to operate on natural gas. This was achieved by replacing the oil burner on the unit with a gas burner, with the old boiler casing and heat exchanger being retained. If you think you might have such an appliance contact Bord Gáis Networks on 1850 79 79 79 for a free safety check.

    Have you got a Declaration of Conformance?
    The domestic installation standard I.S. 813 requires that natural gas installers provide you with a certificate confirming that the gas installation work was carried out in conformance with the standard and is safe to use. This is an important document, so keep in a safe place.

    Going on Holidays?
    If you go on holidays make sure your appliances are turned off. However, in very cold weather your central heating boiler can be left operating at a low setting in order to prevent water pipes from freezing.

    Bord Gáis Networks contact number: 1850 79 79 79
    Lines open: 8am to 8pm Monday to Friday. 9am to 5.30pm Saturday


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,221 ✭✭✭braddun


    buy co detectors,put them in each room that has fuel burning

    only used licenced installers


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  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    330148.pdf

    330149.png


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,884 ✭✭✭Robbie.G




  • Registered Users Posts: 2,674 ✭✭✭Skatedude


    I always have 3 co alarms in the house, one in each bedroom and one in the kitchen as the boiler is just off the kitchen.
    And wired smoke alarm system.
    Worth it for piece of mind considering how cheap co and smoke alarms are.


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    Robbie.G wrote: »

    Thanks for heads up Robbie.

    Lads please share on Twitter, Facebook etc. I still come across people who think that a smoke alarm covers co also, so make that clear when sharing please.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Registered Users Posts: 33,169 ✭✭✭✭NIMAN


    I was just thinking the other day that it would be a good safety measure for the Gov to offer 1 CO alarm per house in the country?

    I think there are 1.7 million premises, and I am sure if buying in that quantity they could get a rate of €10 per alarm from some manufacturer.

    Total cost €17m - sounds a lot but in Gov spending terms, nothing really.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 11 murfitt


    NIMAN wrote: »
    I was just thinking the other day that it would be a good safety measure for the Gov to offer 1 CO alarm per house in the country?

    I think there are 1.7 million premises, and I am sure if buying in that quantity they could get a rate of €10 per alarm from some manufacturer.

    Total cost €17m - sounds a lot but in Gov spending terms, nothing really.

    They could buy them at that amount for approximately €3.50 each.
    But that's too sensible for our government!


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,565 ✭✭✭K.Flyer


    NIMAN wrote: »
    I was just thinking the other day that it would be a good safety measure for the Gov to offer 1 CO alarm per house in the country?

    I think there are 1.7 million premises, and I am sure if buying in that quantity they could get a rate of €10 per alarm from some manufacturer.

    Total cost €17m - sounds a lot but in Gov spending terms, nothing really.

    The problem is that half of them would end up left in a drawer or somewhere and not get used as intended.
    The amount of times when I suggested to people about having a C.O. alarm fitted only to be told that they did have one somewhere but they haven't got around to putting it up.
    In one case the unit was still in the bag and still had the receipt which was a year old.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11 murfitt


    K.Flyer wrote: »
    The problem is that half of them would end up left in a drawer or somewhere and not get used as intended.
    The amount of times when I suggested to people about having a C.O. alarm fitted only to be told that they did have one somewhere but they haven't got around to putting it up.
    In one case the unit was still in the bag and still had the receipt which was a year old.

    I always fit them after a boiler/aga/stove service.
    I explain to them how few ppm it takes to cause permanent brain damage or death, depending on the exposure.

    They're usually happy enough then.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,565 ✭✭✭K.Flyer


    murfitt wrote: »
    I always fit them after a boiler/aga/stove service.
    I explain to them how few ppm it takes to cause permanent brain damage or death, depending on the exposure.

    They're usually happy enough then.

    I would always encourage the fitting of one as well, it just surprises me how many tell me that they already have one.... In a drawer somewhere.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,169 ✭✭✭✭NIMAN


    Of course a certain number would end up in a drawer or sold on DoneDeal for a few Euro, but at least some lives might be saved by the ones that are put up.

    €3.50 each x 1.7million = €5,950,000.

    So cheap in relative terms. Can't understand why some TD isn't proposing this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,884 ✭✭✭Robbie.G




  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    Robbie.G wrote: »


    A mother and son felt sick for months before realising that they had been unknowingly poisoned by their wood burner stove.

    http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/Cambridge-family-poisoned-carbon-monoxide-leaking/story-26121142-detail/story.html

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    Dublin couple die of suspected CO poisoning.
    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/carbon-monoxide-suspected-in-death-of-elderly-couple-31053841.html

    Keep spreading the word lads. These are needless deaths. I carry a few alarms with me and sell them at cost to customers who agree to buy one. Might be a good idea for all of us to do this.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    Wearb wrote: »
    Dublin couple die of suspected CO poisoning.
    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/carbon-monoxide-suspected-in-death-of-elderly-couple-31053841.html

    Keep spreading the word lads. These are needless deaths. I carry a few alarms with me and sell them at cost to customers who agree to buy one. Might be a good idea for all of us to do this.

    Cause of death not yet established.
    But either way it's important to have a working CO alarm.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,938 ✭✭✭galljga1


    I have two solid fuel stoves, oil fired central heating (boiler in garage which shares wall with daughters bedroom) and a gas hob.
    I have 6 photoelectric smoke alarms.
    I have 6 ionisation smoke alarms.
    I have 6 CO alarms, three different types, two wired with backup batteries.

    My brother, visiting on one occasion declared me to be paranoid. He has a couple of ancient smoke alarms and does not regularly change batteries.
    My response: No, we sleep safe at night, you on the other hand should be paranoid.


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  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    galljga1 wrote: »
    I have two solid fuel stoves, oil fired central heating (boiler in garage which shares wall with daughters bedroom) and a gas hob.
    I have 6 photoelectric smoke alarms.
    I have 6 ionisation smoke alarms.
    I have 6 CO alarms, three different types, two wired with backup batteries.

    My brother, visiting on one occasion declared me to be paranoid. He has a couple of ancient smoke alarms and does not regularly change batteries.
    My response: No, we sleep safe at night, you on the other hand should be paranoid.

    Good for you. Keep spreading the word. If I visit a house where there is obviously a need for one, I mention it, but don't dwell on it (until next time). I wonder is that why I am not asked to parties any more :(

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    Good deal at Aldi

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,740 ✭✭✭✭Dtp1979


    Wearb wrote: »
    Good deal at Aldi

    Wearb, do you know if those co alarms meet the new regs?


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    Dtp1979 wrote: »
    Wearb, do you know if those co alarms meet the new regs?

    Can you point me to, or explain the new regs please?

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,740 ✭✭✭✭Dtp1979


    Wearb wrote: »
    Can you point me to, or explain the new regs please?

    No link but this might help
    I.1.1 The carbon monoxide (CO) detector shall comply with the requirements of this Standard, I.S. 3218,
    and I.S. EN 50291 -1. Compliance is stated on the packaging and also on the CO detector markings.


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    Dtp1979 wrote: »
    No link but this might help
    I.1.1 The carbon monoxide (CO) detector shall comply with the requirements of this Standard, I.S. 3218,
    and I.S. EN 50291 -1. Compliance is stated on the packaging and also on the CO detector markings.

    Thanks

    Just been reading some information. It seems there is a requirement for an end of life warning, timer or sealed battery that runs out of power before the end of the cell life. Those requirements, along with the usual, visual and audible alarms.

    I am unsure if those new regs apply in all circumstances. My reading so far, seems to suggest that they apply to new or replacement installs of equipment capable of producing CO.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,884 ✭✭✭Robbie.G


    Wearb wrote: »
    Thanks

    Just been reading some information. It seems there is a requirement for an end of life warning, timer or sealed battery that runs out of power before the end of the cell life. Those requirements, along with the usual, visual and audible alarms.

    I am unsure if those new regs apply in all circumstances. My reading so far, seems to suggest that they apply to new or replacement installs of equipment capable of producing CO.

    Yes it part of is 813 and building regs part j that co detectors be fitted with a new appliance.
    I've been fitting them for the last 5 or 6 years for local authorities.
    With the amount of co incidents and deaths they should be mandatory


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,740 ✭✭✭✭Dtp1979


    Robbie.G wrote: »
    Yes it part of is 813 and building regs part j that co detectors be fitted with a new appliance.
    I've been fitting them for the last 5 or 6 years for local authorities.
    With the amount of co incidents and deaths they should be mandatory

    It's only with open flued and flueless isn't it?


  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    Yes Dec, Openflued and clueless (cooking appliance are exempt)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 12,740 ✭✭✭✭Dtp1979


    DGOBS wrote: »
    Yes Dec, Openflued and clueless (cooking appliance are exempt)

    Typical. My inspector said the opposite.


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