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**Carbon Monoxide Awareness**

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  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    DGOBS wrote: »
    Yes Dec, Openflued and clueless (cooking appliance are exempt)

    My missus is exempt so :eek:

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    lol@ typo FLUELESS....

    Dec, Part J Building regs 2014, states is clearly


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,745 ✭✭✭✭Dtp1979


    DGOBS wrote: »
    lol@ typo FLUELESS....

    Dec, Part J Building regs 2014, states is clearly

    Not doubting you for a second tony. I'd say my inspector is flueless!


  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    I am sure all was with best intentions


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,953 ✭✭✭jimf


    the consumer show on rte1 tonight is doing a slot on co poisoning it airs at 8.30 pm


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  • Registered Users Posts: 18 crow75


    What is the best CO alarm and what is the best smoke alarm? i have a kidde co and smoke alarm in hallway, a c0 alarm in our bedroom and one in sitting room where the open fire is. I have another smoke alarm near back of house too. whats the best kinds to have? any thoughts on the kidde one?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,938 ✭✭✭galljga1


    Not sure what the best is but I have a number of Fireangel, Kidde and Eyston smoke and co2 alarms and generic (the brand may be "do not paint") wired alarms (both co2 and smoke) that were put in during a bit of remodelling. I have enough brands and types to allow for a bit of redundancy. Don't forget there are ionisation and photoelectric smoke alarms, both worth having.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18 crow75


    Thanks galljga1. what is the difference between ionisation and photoelectric smoke alarms? do you mean by 'do not paint' as in what is written on the back? ive a feeling i should have/be doing more.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,938 ✭✭✭galljga1


    crow75 wrote: »
    Thanks galljga1. what is the difference between ionisation and photoelectric smoke alarms? do you mean by 'do not paint' as in what is written on the back? ive a feeling i should have/be doing more.

    It is quite an important difference that not everybody is aware of. Text below from a quick google, it is best to have both.

    "In tests, ionization alarms will typically respond about 30 to 90 seconds faster to “fast-flame” fires than photoelectric smoke alarms. However, in smoldering fires ionization alarms respond an average of 15 to 50 minutes slower than photoelectric alarms. Several studies indicate that they will outright fail to activate up to 20-25% of the time. The vast majority of residential fire fatalities are due to smoke inhalation, not from the actual flames and almost two-thirds of fire fatalities occur at night while we sleep."

    The Fireangel Atom is quite small but a bit expensive although the battery should last 5 years. I said should because I needed to replace the battery in 1 of 5 I bought, the other 4 still going strong after approx 3 years.




    Oh and the 'do not paint' brand was a poor joke. Quite simply, that is all that is on the front although there is some model number on the back.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18 crow75


    ahha! get you now! Ok i must check to see hwat kind mine is, whether it is ionization or photo. i take it the fireangel atom is an ion one?? where is the best place to purchase?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,938 ✭✭✭galljga1


    crow75 wrote: »
    ahha! get you now! Ok i must check to see hwat kind mine is, whether it is ionization or photo. i take it the fireangel atom is an ion one?? where is the best place to purchase?

    The atom is actually photoelectrical. I got mine in B and Q when they were on special offer and the store also had a min spend offer.


  • Registered Users Posts: 45 thebeeb


    I would assume the best place to put the alarm is in the room the burning appliance is rather then ones bedroom??


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,745 ✭✭✭✭Dtp1979


    thebeeb wrote: »
    I would assume the best place to put the alarm is in the room the burning appliance is rather then ones bedroom??

    What if that room is at the far end of the house from the bedrooms and u can't hear the alarm


  • Registered Users Posts: 45 thebeeb


    Good point....only asking really as by the time CO reaches the bedroom and the alarm goes off it could be too late. Maybe place one in the room with the appliance and one in the hall?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,884 ✭✭✭Robbie.G


    thebeeb wrote: »
    Good point....only asking really as by the time CO reaches the bedroom and the alarm goes off it could be too late. Maybe place one in the room with the appliance and one in the hall?

    Get co alarms that are interconnected so if one goes of so do the others
    That way you don't have to worry about not hearing them.
    Check ei electronics for a full range


  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    Hi Guys, just a reminder of CO awareness week all next week!



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    Good deal on CO alarms in Aldi. If you don't have at least one, now is the time to get one.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    http://m.independent.ie/style/celebrity/celebrity-news/nadine-coyle-is-lucky-to-be-alive-after-carbon-monoxide-poisoning-forced-family-to-evacuate-home-34152329.html

    Nadine Coyle's brush with CO poisoning shuld help raise awareness. It can be a slow poisoning (as in her case) or very rapid killer.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Registered Users Posts: 95 ✭✭marsbar1


    Its important to be aware of carbon monoxide. But we should be aware of going OTT. For example a house with no gas appliances, an oil boiler outside in the garden and no fireplace there is no risk. No need for a vent in every room and worries about carbon monoxide.


  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    So, the house I was at about 9 years ago where 2 people lost their lives due to CO and an outdoor oil boiler, is in your opinion OTT.

    CO alarm in every house regardless would be mine.

    Also, have seen where a CO alarm activated from burning electrical cables (over 100 ppm in the house):eek:

    OTT, maybe, €25-40 for an alarm, a single life, priceless


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  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    marsbar1 wrote: »
    Its important to be aware of carbon monoxide. But we should be aware of going OTT. For example a house with no gas appliances, an oil boiler outside in the garden and no fireplace there is no risk. No need for a vent in every room and worries about carbon monoxide.

    Believe it or not, electric ovens have been known to produce CO.
    Also a poorly installed outside boiler can also cause problems. Lots of them are poorly installed.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    And ventilation is about air quality (and part of our building regulations), not just for fuel burning appliances.

    We live in a 'damp' country, ventilation prevents things like mould growth, which when sporing can cause respiratory issues and other health problems.


  • Registered Users Posts: 46 FTimon


    Are there CO2 and Smoke/Fire detectors in one unit?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,775 ✭✭✭JamesM


    We had the oil boiler in the kitchen and got a combined detector. Not a good idea, because the grill often set off the smoke detector. We would then move it out of the kitchen, so therefore had no CO2 detector in the kitchen. We later got separate ones.
    Jim.


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    Even the paramedics were affected. Just goes to show that you don't need to be sitting there breathing it in for any long period of time. You have to take action instantly. GET OUT. Leave doors open behind you. Call fire brigade if necessary.

    http://m.independent.ie/irish-news/news/man-60-dies-from-suspected-carbon-monoxide-poisoning-34673433.html

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    Know the Danger Signs

    Watch out for any of the warning signs that your appliance is not functioning properly:

    Staining, sooting or discolouration around the appliance
    Appliances that burn slowly, badly (orange or 'floppy' flames) or go out
    A yellow or orange flame where normally blue
    Condensation or dampness on walls and windows in the room once the appliance is lit
    A strange smell when the appliance is on
    Rusting or water streaking on appliance cabinet/vent/chimney
    Loose or disconnected vent/chimney connections or guards

    If you detect any of these conditions, have a professional service technician fully examine the unit for safety.

    http://www.carbonmonoxide.ie/index.htm

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



  • Registered Users Posts: 47 braka


    Just to pass on my experience of an encounter with CO.
    Last year I carried out a service (for a young couple with a young baby) on an internal Firebird Super Q.
    When I noticed they hadn't got a CO alarm anywhere in the house (they had a stove also), I advised they get one ASAP and they
    promised they would.

    One morning around 9:30 (about 3 months later) I got a call to say that their CO alarm had gone off, and this had happened only

    a short time after their oil boiler had been running.

    I immediately went to the house ...having advised the couple to vacate it.
    I used my Flue Gas Analyser to check the CO levels inside of the house, and was amazed to find high levels of C.O. 250-300

    parts/million in all rooms!

    I switched on the Oil Boiler and found levels of 20 parts/million in the flue... so that ruled out the Oil Boiler as the CO source.

    Eventually I traced the CO high levels to a Bucket Of ASHES (clean out from the stove) which had been left inside the back door

    that morning!!! Coincidentally at the same time as the oil boiler was running.

    The ashes contained some small particles of unburnt turf / briquettes and this was producing Carbon Monoxide at a rate of

    THOUSANDS of parts/ Million. !!
    The ashes were to have been left outside in the ashes bin, but there was a severe wind blowing earlier, and they were left (in

    the galvanised bucket) at the backdoor for removal later.
    The bucket was hot to touch on its side, but there was no smell of fumes/burning in the house.

    When I brought the bucket outside and poured water into it, there was an immediate blast of steam from the ashes !!

    I have no doubt but the CO alarm averted a tragedy in this case, and it taught me a valuable lesson on CO and how easily it can

    be produced.

    I have told many about this incident, as I believe the public don't appreciate the danger of C.O. and it needs to be constantly highlighted.


  • Hosted Moderators Posts: 3,496 ✭✭✭DGOBS


    @Braka, 30ppm is the evacuation limit for you if carrying out room CO testing, where you encounter 200-300ppm, you need to ventilate and evacuate, do not hang around in this type of atmosphere.

    You should have a personal CO alarm on your breast pocket at all times in your line of work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 47 braka


    DGOBS wrote: »
    @Braka, 30ppm is the evacuation limit for you if carrying out room CO testing, where you encounter 200-300ppm, you need to ventilate and evacuate, do not hang around in this type of atmosphere.

    You should have a personal CO alarm on your breast pocket at all times in your line of work.

    I agree 100 % DGOBS ...

    If I was to do it again I'd have ventilated before searching for source ..

    Personal CO alarm is a part of the kit.. as I'm only too aware of the CO danger.

    In fairness, I'd say the people on this forum are aware...its the general public that need reminding of the CO threat.

    The ashes in a bucket scenario was one I hadn't seen discussed anywhere so I thought I'd share it.


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  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators Posts: 6,233 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wearb


    braka wrote: »
    I agree 100 % DGOBS ...

    If I was to do it again I'd have ventilated before searching for source ..

    Personal CO alarm is a part of the kit.. as I'm only too aware of the CO danger.

    In fairness, I'd say the people on this forum are aware...its the general public that need reminding of the CO threat.

    The ashes in a bucket scenario was one I hadn't seen discussed anywhere so I thought I'd share it.

    People were killed in France by leaving a used BBQ in the kitchen part of their tent.

    Please follow site and charter rules. "Resistance is futile"



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