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Things said in Ireland that no one says in England

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  • bodhi085 wrote: »
    Being an English fella here for 15 years now and I went to a club the first week of moving over and some girl said "sorry" as she stood there waiting to get past. Had me baffled. Now I've been here that long that I'm always saying Irish sayings like that. My family in the uk would be wondering the stuff I come out with on Skype. Runners (trainers) rashers (bacon) bye bye bye!!!

    Ah you're grand!:D




  • Out with a bunch of English lads this weekend. They do a whip!

    It's basically a kitty, but I've never heard of a whip before.... Maybe makes sense though, I presume it comes from whip around




  • Irish - Hair bobbin
    English - Hair band

    When it's raining
    Irish - it's lashing outside
    English - It's pissing outside

    Irish - Buzzing
    I'm not sure what the English equivalent is.

    I use more of the English phrases only some of the irish phrases.




  • Irish - Hair bobbin
    English - Hair band

    Are they not two different things?

    A bobbin is used to tie hair back in a ponytail whereas a band is used to pull the hair back away from the forehead




  • FunLover18 wrote: »
    Are they not two different things?

    A bobbin is used to tie hair back in a ponytail whereas a band is used to pull the hair back away from the forehead

    English say hair band for the ones you tie the hair back too I've always said hair band an all my English mates say the same. I used to have no idea what a bobbin was.


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  • McGaggs wrote: »
    Never heard it and only ever seen it written on boards.ie

    Very common in the West of Ireland




  • Seve OB wrote: »
    Out with a bunch of English lads this weekend. They do a whip!

    It's basically a kitty, but I've never heard of a whip before.... Maybe makes sense though, I presume it comes from whip around

    a "whip (a)round"

    to generate a fund for various options

    set up a kitty

    to help/support someone, friend or otherwise




  • Another thing my dad used to say, about something that was in a very poor state of repair, that it was 'hanging to pieces'.

    tac




  • Ireland - Runners
    Rest of the World - Trainers/Sneakers

    Ireland - Gimme that yoke
    England - ???

    Ireland - I will in me hole
    England - No, I will not do that




  • I`m originally from over the Irish sea, and was living down in London with my Irish girlfriend, her teenage sister came over to stay with us for a few weeks. We where walking down the road one day, when she stopped dead in the street and burst out laughing. So i asked her whats up? She pointed at the side of a mini bus, which read "dial-a-ride" which in london at the time was a service to take the old folks to hospital appointments and the like. She was thinking London had some very liberal sex laws.


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  • I was chatting with a woman yesterday who described two people as being ‘very great’ meaning close friends. I don’t know if it’s an old timey expression or a country expression but I’ve never heard it in England.

    I lit up when I heard it. Love that description of friends!




  • I seem to remember it as an old expression my mother would have used occasionally in the north of England. I'm not absolutely sure though, it may come back to me!




  • I was chatting with a woman yesterday who described two people as being ‘very great’ meaning close friends. I don’t know if it’s an old timey expression or a country expression but I’ve never heard it in England.

    I lit up when I heard it. Love that description of friends!

    I haven't hear that expression in years. I love it though.




  • Ireland: I was sitting.
    England: I was sat.




    Ireland: I was standing.
    England: I was stood.




  • My ex is English. Sometimes I would finish my sentences with the word 'so', like OK so....she'd say 'so'? 'So what?




  • I've been working with an English guy for 2 years now. He's been having good fun with us and our words. Last week it was "cough bottle" he thought this was a good one.

    He still cant get some of the Irish names though. I can see the Fr Dougal look on his face when someone says an Irish name.




  • 'he fell down on the FLOOR' when it's outside ---- it's ' the ground '!!!, in fairness thats just a bit dopey by them .




  • Oops69 wrote: »
    'he fell down on the FLOOR' when it's outside ---- it's ' the ground '!!!, in fairness thats just a bit dopey by them .

    No, that's just, as you say, dopey, most people would say ground, I think.




  • Irish - Hair bobbin
    English - Hair band

    When it's raining
    Irish - it's lashing outside
    English - It's pissing outside

    Irish - Buzzing
    I'm not sure what the English equivalent is.

    I use more of the English phrases only some of the irish phrases.
    Buzzing is bull****ting, isn't it? Only heard "buzzing" last year from an eejit builder who was going on about how the place he was working was going to be a strip club or some ****e.




  • This post has been deleted.


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  • Permabear wrote: »
    This post had been deleted.
    Yes, I think the usage I'm using is possibly Dublin-centric.
    "Why are you saying such ****e?"
    "I'm only buzzing."
    "Buzzing?"




  • This post has been deleted.




  • Yes, I think the usage I'm using is possibly Dublin-centric.
    "Why are you saying such ****e?"
    "I'm only buzzing."
    "Buzzing?"
    As in messing around or being facetious?




  • As in messing around or being facetious?
    Yes, I'm not sure if messing itself is Irish only, though, I used to, but then I remembered Kenneth Williams saying "stop messin' about!" but I think Irish just tend to drop the about.




  • de dubs 'do be buzzin of each udder' all de toime , in that sense it means getting on well together whether its recreational or working together .




  • If I went back through all the posts I would probably find it has already been mentioned, "I was sat"instead of "I was sitting","I was stood" instead of "I was standing".English people showing their brilliant grammar skills with their own language.




  • I love the way some in the UK add an R when there are two vowels following each other. Scratching my head to think of an example, but let's say Emma Ellis. It can turn into Emmar Ellis.

    Re going for the messages, I also would love to know the etymology of that one! I read upthread that it was connected with going to the post office for telegraph messages and picking up a few bits in the shop whilst there, or writing a message to the shopkeeper for the illiterate maid to pick up for the Lady of the Manor.

    I was reading a book recently based in Scotland and one of the characters kept mentioning going to the shops for "Comestibles" Now I wonder if the "mes" in that word morphed into messages. The phrase is used in Scotland AFAIK. Although it's a long shot.

    Anyway I had to look up the word comestible, I had never come across it used in everyday speak up to then. For shame.

    There is also the Fetch, Shall, and Perhaps. We say Get, Will, and Maybe.

    It is totally fascinating.




  • lulu1 wrote: »
    Did anyone ever notice when they go to stay with friends/family in england that they would drink tea all day and nothing to eat with it..
    And to complicate matters, they call their dinner tea (which mostly doesn't include a cup of tea).




  • lardarse wrote: »
    I`m originally from over the Irish sea, and was living down in London with my Irish girlfriend, her teenage sister came over to stay with us for a few weeks. We where walking down the road one day, when she stopped dead in the street and burst out laughing. So i asked her whats up? She pointed at the side of a mini bus, which read "dial-a-ride" which in london at the time was a service to take the old folks to hospital appointments and the like. She was thinking London had some very liberal sex laws.

    lol. On a trip to Galway once I saw an attractive young female backpacker (looked american) thumbing with a small bunch of flowers and a sign that said 'a flower for a ride' :eek:


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  • Whats the craig saying that to an English person will give you strange looks.


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