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Photo ID Card?

  • 01-03-2013 2:22pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 8,207 ✭✭✭ VanZan


    I'm usually stumped when I'm asked for photo ID. Invariably this means my Passport which for obvious reasons I don't carry everywhere with me. I don't know how to drive so no license. Is there any accredited photo ID card in Ireland? I'm a UL graduate and regret not holding onto my student card! The only thing I can find is the "Garda Age Card" but it specifically states it's only to be used when buying the demon drink.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 78,217 ✭✭✭✭ Victor




  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,271 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    Apply for the new drivers permit. It's a credit card euro style licence.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,207 ✭✭✭ VanZan


    @Victor: Seems to be by invitation only!

    @kceire: €35!!!!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,884 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph


    I wish Ireland had the same rules as most every other EU state wrt ID and registering one's abode.

    Only us and the Brits seem happy that with no national ID card and no way of proving your identity and address in a convenient manner.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 115 ✭✭ lockon...


    murphaph wrote: »
    I wish Ireland had the same rules as most every other EU state wrt ID and registering one's abode.

    Only us and the Brits seem happy that with no national ID card and no way of proving your identity and address in a convenient manner.

    I'd rather not live in a "papers please" country and would reject strongly the introduction of a national ID.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,236 ✭✭✭ Dr. Kenneth Noisewater


    VanZan wrote: »
    @Victor: Seems to be by invitation only

    Technically yes, but if youre in receipt of a SW payment you can get one no hassle. Depending on your local office's numbers (they have to meet a 100 card quota each week) they might do one for you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,207 ✭✭✭ VanZan


    Ahh I didn't know that. Will be straight on to those friendly folks in Dominic Street on Monday then. Just hope they've started answering the phones again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,001 ✭✭✭ Peanut2011


    lockon... wrote: »

    I'd rather not live in a "papers please" country and would reject strongly the introduction of a national ID.

    Don't mean to derail the topic but why would you find a problem with the national ID card?

    Wouldn't that be an answer for many things and also reduce the time and problems that the OP and others experience. Sure when you go to the bank they want ID as well.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,188 ✭✭✭ lucernarian


    Maybe a national ID card can be provided for that will carry out some of the functions mentioned, while still not making card carriage in public compulsory? An optional ID card for convenience in these matters that can serve as an age card and as ID for banking and such purposes. The age card is not always accepted as a form of photo ID in situations I've encountered. Though there's nothing stopping any Irish adult from applying for one... (except the cost of €12 IIRC)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,827 Prodigious


    Garda Age card is a tenner. Agecard.ie


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,822 Morf


    Maybe a national ID card can be provided for that will carry out some of the functions mentioned, while still not making card carriage in public compulsory? An optional ID card for convenience in these matters that can serve as an age card and as ID for banking and such purposes. The age card is not always accepted as a form of photo ID in situations I've encountered. Though there's nothing stopping any Irish adult from applying for one... (except the cost of €12 IIRC)

    Absolutely this. An optional National ID card that could be used instead of a Passport within the EU (as is the case in other countries) would be a great idea.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,884 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph


    lockon... wrote: »
    I'd rather not live in a "papers please" country and would reject strongly the introduction of a national ID.
    Even if a debtor who owed you money was prevented from disappearing into the ether as so often happens in Ireland?

    Do you think Ireland has been a "free" place to live over the past 40 years compared to nasty "papers please" countries like Germany? Are German women forced to go to Ireland for abortions? Were Germans flocking to Ireland for divorces until Germany recently introduced it for themselves?

    In reality, you will never be asked for your "papers please" in Germany unless you want access to a service were you need to provide proof of identity and abode (like opening a bank account, or collecting a parcel that went to the post office because you weren't at home).

    You will not be stopped at random by some Gestapo officer with a monocle and asked to prove your identity at random, before being dragged off to some cellar and beaten with a telephone directory.

    I think people who would "reject strongly the idea of a national ID card" don't really know why.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,855 ✭✭✭✭ Alun


    I agree. If you'd actually lived in a country (or countries) for any length of time where national ID cards are the norm, like I have, you'd wonder what all the fuss is about.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,884 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph


    Alun wrote: »
    I agree. If you'd actually lived in a country (or countries) for any length of time where national ID cards are the norm, like I have, you'd wonder what all the fuss is about.
    ...and coming from a country that doesn't issue these cards means you need your (expensive) passport for many silly bits of mundane business that the locals can conduct with the credit card sized document they always have with them anyway.

    As you say Alun, much ado about nothing. If the UK had national ID cards we'd have them a fortnight later I bet.

    In Germany these is an "Ausweißpflicht". That means that the police can detain you until they satisfy themselves as to your identity. It doesn't mean that you need to carry a national ID card and you can't be charged for not having it on you, but this is the most practical way of course. Law abiding citizens will probably never be stopped and detained in this way in their entire lives.


  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 20,994 Mod ✭✭✭✭ bk


    I think we are in a serious need of a national ID card that contains your name, date of birth and address.

    A big problem that I'm finding is that most banks require a esb/gas/phone bill to prove your address when opening an account, but now most of these are coming as paperless bills these days, but the banks wont accept a print out of these!!

    Catch-22

    A national ID card would fix this issue.

    You can make the carrying of this card completely optional, thus eliminating any privacy concerns.

    I have always said that one way of doing this, is to allow people to opt in to getting a national ID card along with their passport for a small additional fee. I know I would jump at that, in order to avoid carrying my passport when travelling in EU. I'm always jealous of my Polish girlfriend who just has to bring the small convenient national ID card when travelling, rather then the big, stupid, easy to lose passport.

    It is a pity that the new style driving license can't be used for this purpose either.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,855 ✭✭✭✭ Alun


    murphaph wrote: »
    In Germany these is an "Ausweißpflicht". That means that the police can detain you until they satisfy themselves as to your identity. It doesn't mean that you need to carry a national ID card and you can't be charged for not having it on you, but this is the most practical way of course. Law abiding citizens will probably never be stopped and detained in this way in their entire lives.
    It's the same in the Netherlands, called the "legitimatieplicht" which just means you have to be able to formally identify yourself using one of passport, ID card or driving licence.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,855 ✭✭✭✭ Alun


    bk wrote: »
    A big problem that I'm finding is that most banks require a esb/gas/phone bill to prove your address when opening an account, but now most of these are coming as paperless bills these days, but the banks wont accept a print out of these!!

    Catch-22
    It's even worse when you've just arrived in the country .. a real Catch-22 then.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,492 KCAccidental


    Morf wrote: »
    Absolutely this. An optional National ID card that could be used instead of a Passport within the EU (as is the case in other countries) would be a great idea.


    I'm not sure we would be able to do that without joining Schengen and that ain't gonna happen anytime soon :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,958 ✭✭✭✭ Del2005


    murphaph wrote: »
    ...and coming from a country that doesn't issue these cards means you need your (expensive) passport for many silly bits of mundane business that the locals can conduct with the credit card sized document they always have with them anyway.

    As you say Alun, much ado about nothing. If the UK had national ID cards we'd have them a fortnight later I bet.

    We can't have ID cards due to the Common Travel Area, which would mean both the UK and Ireland need to introduce them at same time. So the UK's anti Europe bias is stopping us getting them. Just from reading the link I've posted since the Common Travel area has formal or legislative standing why can't we alter it?
    murphaph wrote: »
    In Germany these is an "Ausweißpflicht". That means that the police can detain you until they satisfy themselves as to your identity. It doesn't mean that you need to carry a national ID card and you can't be charged for not having it on you, but this is the most practical way of course. Law abiding citizens will probably never be stopped and detained in this way in their entire lives.
    Alun wrote: »
    It's the same in the Netherlands, called the "legitimatieplicht" which just means you have to be able to formally identify yourself using one of passport, ID card or driving licence.

    We have the same law here. If the Gardaí, or PSNI/UK Police, stop you they can arrest you till you prove your identity. I always chuckle when watching the UK police shows with the amount of dodgy drivers who don't carry ID and get arrested, or produce a ATM card at the last second. An ATM card should not be accepted as ID.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,106 antoobrien


    bk wrote: »
    I think we are in a serious need of a national ID card that contains your name, date of birth and address.

    While I don't mind the idea of having an ID card, is the requirement for the address a bit OTT?

    I'm just thinking about it from my experience of renting, with all the changing addresses etc it'd be too easy for it to go out of date.

    I'd say it'd be just an administrative nightmare unless the database could be used to allow one notify companies etc of changes of address to make modifying accounts easier.

    Queue the civil liberties outcry of big brother.


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  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 20,994 Mod ✭✭✭✭ bk


    I'm not sure we would be able to do that without joining Schengen and that ain't gonna happen anytime soon :(
    Del2005 wrote: »
    We can't have ID cards due to the Common Travel Area, which would mean both the UK and Ireland need to introduce them at same time.

    No, we wouldn't need to join Schengen and the Common Travel Area with the UK would have no effect on it.

    You wouldn't need to join Schengen, the schengen countries would just have to agree to accept an Irish national ID card as being a valid form of EU travel document in order to enter their country, just like the Irish and UK passports currently are.

    The Common Travel Area also wouldn't be an issue, yes it would mean that you couldn't make it mandatory to carry such a national id card in Ireland, as people from the UK don't have one, but no one is suggesting that.

    I think people really don't understand Schengen Agreement or The Common Travel Area or even how national id cards actually work.

    So let me make it clear, Ireland, UK, every other EU state and some non EU (e.g. Norway) are members of the European Economic Area.

    EEA member states' citizens holding a national identity card can not only use it as an identity document within their home country, but also as a travel document to exercise the right of free movement in the EEA (yes including the UK and Ireland).

    This is why my Polish girlfriend can use her Polish ID card to enter and leave Ireland, UK and Poland and never takes her passport with her. Even Ryanair are required to accept.

    Ireland is thus also well within it's rights to also issue a national ID card and with such a card could enter and leave Ireland, UK and any EEA (and Switzerland) with this card.

    Non membership of Schengen just means that we have border checks between Ireland and the rest of the schengen members and we have to show either or passport or national ID card (e.g. my Polish girlfriends ID card) when enter and leaving the schengen area. So no change at all required, no need to join Schengen.

    The Common Travel Area just means we can't force people from the UK to show their passport or ID card when entering Ireland. Having an ID card would have zero impact on this.
    antoobrien wrote: »
    While I don't mind the idea of having an ID card, is the requirement for the address a bit OTT?

    I'm just thinking about it from my experience of renting, with all the changing addresses etc it'd be too easy for it to go out of date.

    Well, it doesn't seem to be any issue in Germany or many other EU countries!!

    How it works in Germany, is that the national ID cards are issued by your local town hall and include your address. When you move, you are supposed to go to the local town hall of your new address within 7 days and they then stamp the rear of the card with your new address.

    Yes the address isn't needed for the purpose of being used as a travel document. However it is used for the purpose of identification and opening bank accounts, contracts, etc. that require a proof of address.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 89,766 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Capt'n Midnight


    Morf wrote: »
    Absolutely this. An optional National ID card that could be used instead of a Passport within the EU (as is the case in other countries) would be a great idea.
    try getting Ryanair to accept it :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,855 ✭✭✭✭ Alun


    try getting Ryanair to accept it :pac:
    They already accept national ID cards issued by other EC countries, an official Irish one shouldn't be any different ...
    The following are the only accepted forms of photo ID
    • A valid passport - ( see below - */and ** below)
    • A valid National Identity Card issued by the government of a European Economic Area (EEA) country. (Only the following EEA countries issue National Identity Cards acceptable for carriage on Ryanair flights: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Finland, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Italy, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK)
    • <snip other forms of acceptable ID>


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,884 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph


    Hmmmm, I wonder what that UK national ID card is that Ryanair accept.


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,217 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    murphaph wrote: »
    Hmmmm, I wonder what that UK national ID card is that Ryanair accept.

    I think the new drivers licence is deemed sufficiently secure.


  • Registered Users Posts: 31,347 ✭✭✭✭ Gatling


    Will the new social welfare photo id cards count as a identity card other than for services attached to welfare

    Langley , Virginia



  • Registered Users Posts: 78,217 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    It is a public services card, so it can be used for a variety of purposes.

    It is designed to be used as a free travel pass, where users will have to tag-on like with a Leap Card. They don't seem to have made a decision on it though.

    It won't replace certain documents like driving licence or passport.


  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 20,994 Mod ✭✭✭✭ bk


    murphaph wrote: »
    Hmmmm, I wonder what that UK national ID card is that Ryanair accept.

    The UK launched a national ID card, about 15,000 were issued before the new government stopped the scheme and stopped issuing them. However those 15000 cards remain valid.

    Which just goes to show that there is absolutely nothing stopping the Irish government from launching their own, preferably voluntary, card. And Ryanair, all other airllines and all EEA countries including the UK would be required to accept it as, per the EEA rules.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,084 ✭✭✭ oppenheimer1


    murphaph wrote: »
    Even if a debtor who owed you money was prevented from disappearing into the ether as so often happens in Ireland?

    Do you think Ireland has been a "free" place to live over the past 40 years compared to nasty "papers please" countries like Germany? Are German women forced to go to Ireland for abortions? Were Germans flocking to Ireland for divorces until Germany recently introduced it for themselves?

    In reality, you will never be asked for your "papers please" in Germany unless you want access to a service were you need to provide proof of identity and abode (like opening a bank account, or collecting a parcel that went to the post office because you weren't at home).

    You will not be stopped at random by some Gestapo officer with a monocle and asked to prove your identity at random, before being dragged off to some cellar and beaten with a telephone directory.

    I think people who would "reject strongly the idea of a national ID card" don't really know why.

    You might have a different opinion if you lived in les banlieue of Paris though.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 18,884 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph



    You might have a different opinion if you lived in les banlieue of Paris though.
    Explain please.


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