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Professional Accounting Bodies - Discussion and Comparisons

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  • Comparison of latest pass rates for 2011 for CPA, ACCA and CAI is here

    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056602953

    (Post 7)




  • Comparison of Accountancy Student & Member Numbers 2006 - 2010 is here

    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056637124




  • This is wrong:

    "Elevation Programme – A recent development from CAI (moving it closer to ACCA’s structure) in that you can study for CAI exams without being in a contract). You pay for your own study, but must eventually enter a contract and serve your time before becoming a full member."

    I just rang the Elevation hot line and you don't need to enter into a contract at all to get your membership.




  • A comparison of latest pass rates in 2012 for CAI, ACCA, CPA and CIMA can be found here

    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056602953

    (post 9)




  • A comparison of latest pass rates in 2012 for CAI, ACCA, CPA and CIMA can be found here

    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056602953

    (post 9)


    The only students that the CPA are picking up appear to be those who aren't capable of passing the other bodies exams!


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  • As an ACA I would recommend it, if you get a contract the structure of the programme is ideal for graduates being set up in a similar manner to uni, and provides decent study leave. I worked with people studying CIMA and ACCA who got 1 day of study leave per exam BUT got paid better, and a lot if these had failed numerous exams along the way but still qualified in the end. It really depends if your company has a graduate scheme, I would recommend taking the option of less pay with more study leave, I don't believe necessarily that any of the qualifications is tougher than any other. I would add that qualification and first time passes does matter depending on where you choose to work. As one poster said it is what recruiters and companies want that matters. As a newly qualified, being ACA with first time passes will give you a much greater chance of getting a job in finance in London etc, especially in investment banks, hedge funds etc.




  • does any one know the pass rate for cpa exams?




  • sandy60 wrote: »
    does any one know the pass rate for cpa exams?

    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?p=82166128#post82166128




  • Comparison of Accountancy Student & Member Numbers 2006 - 2012 is here

    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056637124




  • 2013 final stage Pass Rates for the Top 4 Accountancy Bodies in Ireland

    CAI: In CAI's last two (Autumn) sittings of the Old FAE course the pass rate was 76.3% in 2008 & 76.3% again in 2009.

    Under the new FAE course the overall pass rate dropped to 62% in 2010 and fell again to 55% for 2011.

    Back at 62.3% for 2012 and and 63.4% in 2013

    Note: you can only do CAI finals once per year.

    CPA: CPA usually publish their pass figures in their annual reports.

    See post 17 in this thread for all results from 2003 to 2012.

    Pass rate average for CPA's finals (P2s) in
    2010: 57.5%.
    2011: 53.8%
    2012: 54.2%

    You can sit CPA exams twice per year.

    ACCA: ACCA seem to publish the pass rates on a global basis only, not the pass rates in Ireland.

    Final Stage (Ps) average was
    June 2012: 42.3%
    June 2013: 41.4%

    with two sittings per year.

    CIMA: CIMA, like ACAA, seem to publish the pass rates on a global basis only, not the pass rates in Ireland.
    Final stage (Strategic Level) pass rate:
    2012: 49.8%
    2013: 58.3%

    with two sittings per year.


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  • pass rates [snip]

    Thanks for this post, Mydiscworld. That makes for very interesting reading - Chartered is the highest at 63%. ACCA very low on 41%.




  • Why do you think there is such a large difference in the pass rates between CAI and ACCA? 22% is a big difference.




  • Thanks for this post, Mydiscworld. That makes for very interesting reading - Chartered is the highest at 63%. ACCA very low on 41%.

    Well the Acca and Cima pass rates are worldwide rates not just Irish students.

    In my opinion we would have a higher standard of student than average and therefore the Irish pass rates could be higher

    Other factors like 2 sittings per year vs one could mean some students concentrating more for that one shot to pass in 12 months. The large block of study leave also helps v perhaps a fortnight off for.your acca or Cima exams




  • ACCA have posted their pass rates for all Fundamental and Professional Stage exams for period December 2007 to Dedecmber 2013

    http://www.accaglobal.com/gb/en/student/acca-qual-student-journey/qual-resource/acca-qualification/pass-rates.html

    First time I've noticed them publish it it this format. However, these are Global results, not just for Ireland.

    Professional exam results Dec 2013 sitting
    P1 48,P2 49,P3 49,P4 42,P5 30,P6 41,P7 33




  • cgma.org
    CIMA (the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants) and the AICPA (American Institute of Certified Public Accountants) have launched a new global qualification - CGMA Chartered Global Management Accountant.

    This will be an additional qualification alongside existing qualifications.

    Popup Graphic:
    http://www.cgma.org/BecomeACGMA/HowtoQualify/DownloadableDocuments/cgmaInfographicPopup.html

    I saw elsewhere but can't find it now that students for both will sit the same case study.

    I welcome this new qualification - I will be able to point to a potential American employer that my qualification is also offered by the AICPA.

    Equally I have a dim memory of qualifications having to be vetted for SOX to see if they were sufficient.




  • I notice the CPA pass rates in 2013 for F1 exams jumped from 44% to 61%.

    I know one year doesn't make a trend but one significant thing did happen in 2013. You can now do all CPA F1 exams in any order you like and do how many you like.

    Before that I believe you had to sit all remaining exams in each sitting.

    Should make for higher pass rates and potential better retention of students as they start reaping better rewards for their study efforts




  • I notice the CPA pass rates in 2013 for F1 exams jumped from 44% to 61%.

    I know one year doesn't make a trend but one significant thing did happen in 2013. You can now do all CPA F1 exams in any order you like and do how many you like.

    Before that I believe you had to sit all remaining exams in each sitting.

    Should make for higher pass rates and potential better retention of students as they start reaping better rewards for their study efforts

    CPA finally got there. Good to hear.




  • Hi,
    I'd like your views on doing CIMA exams post ACCA. I have the ACCA exams done 7 years ago, but being in the job market again and wanting to update knowledge I was looking at the CIMA exams. Getting exemption to management level and doing 3 exams E2 P2 F2, would give an advanced diploma in management accounting.

    The course structure is changing in 2015 to computer based/case study.
    Are these exams really tough/ would it be worth it?

    I am looking to move into industry.
    Thanks




  • Hi,
    I'd like your views on doing CIMA exams post ACCA. I have the ACCA exams done 7 years ago, but being in the job market again and wanting to update knowledge I was looking at the CIMA exams. Getting exemption to management level and doing 3 exams E2 P2 F2, would give an advanced diploma in management accounting.

    The course structure is changing in 2015 to computer based/case study.
    Are these exams really tough/ would it be worth it?

    I am looking to move into industry.
    Thanks

    You may be able to simply become a CIMA based on your ACCA qualification. People switch bodies from time to time. Ask CIMA.

    I know of at least two colleagues who switched from CPA to ACCA and just needed to do a quick interview


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  • Thanks mydiscworld, but CIMA exams are industry based while CPA / ACCA are similar as they are more practice based so would be easier to transfer. There's about 5 exams to become fully CIMA qualified post ACCA exemptions. Just thinking of doing 3 of them, but not sure if it'll be worth it or if they are really hard?




  • Hi,
    I'd like your views on doing CIMA exams post ACCA. I have the ACCA exams done 7 years ago, but being in the job market again and wanting to update knowledge I was looking at the CIMA exams. Getting exemption to management level and doing 3 exams E2 P2 F2, would give an advanced diploma in management accounting.

    The course structure is changing in 2015 to computer based/case study.
    Are these exams really tough/ would it be worth it?

    I am looking to move into industry.
    Thanks
    I think you have two options:
    1. depends on what optional papers you did in ACCA. If you did P6 and P7 to qualify, you can sit the P4 and P5 papers to round up your knowledge. These two are more industry related.
    2. If you did P5 in you final optional stage, and/or you still want to further enhance the performance/enterprise side of the skill-set, you can do the CIMA professional gateway.
    Please note, beginning from next year, CIMA will use new syllabus, which in my opinion, is very interesting and geared further towards commercial. It looks like you will study and take the exams in new syllabus. Pass mark will be 70% for the three papers for each of the three levels (in MCQ/ gap briefing, ect computerised format) and 60% for each of the three case studies for each level (essay questions written on computers). From the Gateway, your ACCA membership will grant you the Management level papers. Then you will need to pass the level 2 case studies to progress to level 3 until qualify.




  • Hello, I would like to update the information in the first post regard the Chartered qualification, namely in relation to this paragraph:

    "Elevation Programme – A recent development from CAI (moving it closer to ACCA’s structure) in that you can study for CAI exams without being in a contract). You pay for your own study, but must eventually enter a contract and serve your time before becoming a full member."

    This is incorrect, as you don't need to enter into a contract. We no longer use the name "Elevation", it is now called the Flexible Option and allows students train and qualify outside of a training contract.

    If anyone has any questions, you can send me a PM.




  • If you want to stay in Ireland, then i would say go for ACA. Because it is more focused on Irish business, laws and taxation, and you will get the best value in Ireland.

    But if you are looking to work abroad, then i would suggest you do ACCA or CIMA depending on which sector attracts you more. Since these are global degrees and have presence in many countries, it would be better for you to go for ACCA or CIMA if you intention is to work abroad. Otherwise ACA would be obviously the best choice for anyone as it is the most prestigious accountancy qualification.




  • Morshed13 wrote: »
    ........ACA would be obviously the best choice for anyone as it is the most prestigious accountancy qualification.

    No it's not.




  • No it's not.

    It is to them though...! ;)




  • is the aca, cpa and acca all level 9 on framework? and cima also?




  • is the aca, cpa and acca all level 9 on framework? and cima also?
    I'm pretty sure they all are.


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