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30 DC fast-charging points will be located on motorways by end 2011

  • 19-02-2010 10:49am
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 3,010 Tech3


    I'm not sure where these will be installed probably the rest areas on each motorway but some of the older schemes dont have the rest areas. 30 charge stations is not a lot though considering it takes a half an hour to fully charge up the battery.

    THE FIRST charge points for electric cars in Ireland are to be up and running before Easter.

    The three charge points will be located outside the ESB headquarters on Fitzwilliam Street, the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources on Adelaide Road and the IDA/Sustainability Ireland HQ on Wilton Place, all in Dublin.

    They will be the first of 1,500 charge points to be rolled out by the end of 2011. The project will go to tender later this year.

    The points will be concentrated in urban areas and along major routes initially. A total of 30 DC fast-charging points will be located on motorways. They will allow an electric car to be charged within a half an hour.

    The cars will have top speeds of about 100km/h and a range of 160km in between charging, much less than conventional vehicles, but it is hoped to target buyers who will use them mostly for urban driving.

    Link


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 259 ✭✭ csd


    In Paris, they have these charging points at many underground car parks.

    Was there any build-up to this announcement? It seems to have come out of nowhere. Quite an ambitious rollout programme too!

    /csd


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,404 ✭✭✭ old_aussie


    Sounds like a positive infrastructure step.

    Hope Australia starts rolling out charging points soon.

    That must piss-off the oil barons in the middle east.;)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,468 BluntGuy


    Unexpected stuff, but otherwise good news.

    I suppose these are the green footprints in the "Revised Programme For Government" beginning to shine through? :D


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,010 Tech3


    Yeah I'd say the greens wouldnt be interested in this as it's not public transport :rolleyes:

    It's good news though, although rather out of the blue as such. I didnt expect a plan for the implementation of electric cars and charging points at all. Fair enough the government said that so much of the population will be driving electrics cars in 2020 but this is fianna failours we talking about here. The problem with these new cars is the distance before you have to make your next charge. 160km is measily enough and I wouldnt like to wait a half an hour on the side of a motorway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,091 ✭✭✭ marmurr1916


    They'll need to increase their range and top speed and reduce the charge-up time significantly if electric cars are going to take off.

    Still, this is a good start and hopefully there'll be recharging points on all routes within a few years.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,110 KevR


    They'll need to increase their range and top speed and reduce the charge-up time significantly if electric cars are going to take off.

    Still, this is a good start and hopefully there'll be recharging points on all routes within a few years.

    Agreed.

    I certainly think it's a step in the right direction. Still though, the electricity will be mostly coming from coal and oil power stations so not exactly green.

    If electric or hydrogen cars do end up being a majority in the future and if the electricity/hydrogen is created in a more green manner then I wonder if the people who are currently against all road building on environmental grounds would turn into huge road building supporters? If not, why not?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,305 ✭✭✭ serfboard


    tech2 wrote: »
    I wouldnt like to wait a half an hour on the side of a motorway.

    Agreed. Don't think anyone else will either. I've heard about some possible technological developments whereby you pull into a filling station and drive your car over this yoke, which removes your un-charged battery and replaces it with a charged one. To do this, obviously, the cars would have to be designed to a similar spec with all batteries on the bottom. If this comes to fruition, it will make electric cars really feasible IMO.
    tech2 wrote: »
    160km is measily enough

    Well, it would get you Dublin->Galway with just one stop, and if the solution I mentioned above is in place (i.e. the stop is only 2 minutes) I think that wouldn't present too much difficulty. Dublin->Galway with a 2 minute stop along a motorway would still be better than the situation we had not so long ago where we were crawling through Moate, Ballinasloe etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,977 ✭✭✭ Chris_5339762


    Wonder where they're going to put them on the main routes assuming the MSA project (apart from the Enfield and M1 ones) are on permanent hold and that its illegal to stop anywhere else on the motorway?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,091 ✭✭✭ marmurr1916


    Wonder where they're going to put them on the main routes assuming the MSA project (apart from the Enfield and M1 ones) are on permanent hold and that its illegal to stop anywhere else on the motorway?

    They'll presumably be at the rest areas (i.e lay-bys) that are a feature of Irish motorways.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,977 ✭✭✭ Chris_5339762


    Although I'd leave the lay-bys there as they are a temporary MSA substitute, they're illegal too.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 78,231 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    I'm not convinced about conventionally-sized electric cars - they do nothing to prevent congestion and mostly swop one pollution for another.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,977 ✭✭✭ Chris_5339762


    I still reckon electric cars wont take off until you can get the same mileage out of one of them as you can a conventional tank of petrol. THEN you'll see mass migration to electric cars.

    Couple electric cars with fusion generated power (someday dammit :D ) and most pollution and energy problems will be solved.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,241 ✭✭✭ baalthor


    KevR wrote: »
    Agreed.

    I certainly think it's a step in the right direction. Still though, the electricity will be mostly coming from coal and oil power stations so not exactly green.
    According to my ESB bill, 75% of Ireland's electricity comes from coal and gas.
    We actually generate more from renewables than oil.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,781 ✭✭✭ Carawaystick


    So how do these battery powered cars defog the windscreen or wing mirrors? or heat the interior when it's -8 degrees outside? without a serious compromise in range?


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 61,048 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011


    So how do these battery powered cars defog the windscreen or wing mirrors? or heat the interior when it's -8 degrees outside? without a serious compromise in range?

    Heating elements for the glassware, cabin heater for the cabin. It the cabin heater is electric it destroys the range.

    The Citroen electric vehicles get around this by having a seperate cabin heater that runs on....


    PETROL:rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,231 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    Or leave it plugged in at home.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,019 carlmango11


    If electric or hydrogen cars do end up being a majority in the future and if the electricity/hydrogen is created in a more green manner then I wonder if the people who are currently against all road building on environmental grounds would turn into huge road building supporters? If not, why not?

    I was thinking that myself. Driving with zero carbon emissions is far more comfortable and handy than getting unreliable buses and packed trains. But do we really want a country where everybody drives everywhere? It would be like America on steroids. There is a certain quality to public transport and people walking that driving would completely diminish.

    :confused:
    :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,231 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    Energy sustainability and clean air are only two environmental concepts. I imagine it would be rather difficult to build a road that didn't have an impact on an environment. Materials are used and CO2 still generated (from concrete manufacture and likely construction equipment), landscapes and habitats are still disturbed or destroyed. Watercourses are interfered with and this brings risks of flooding, drinking water contamination and further habitat disturbance (watercourse are majors routes for wildlife). Also, if everyone had a car and driver everywhere there would be congestion, safety and health issues.

    There is also the environmental impact of the vehicles themselves, the mining for metals, including heavy metals have huge impacts.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,208 ✭✭✭ Mrmoe


    Positive step forward I think. Projects like this always have to start somewhere and there are always going to be problems such as range and timing issues to begin with but the only way we can overcome these is if we actually do what we are doing now. People will always need private cars so total public transport is never the total solution. Price wise how much will this save/cost?


  • Registered Users Posts: 406 ✭✭ cc


    I think hydrogen is the way to go. The infrastructure is in place i.e existing petrol stations, you drive in, fill up and go. Really can't understand the push for plug in electrics.


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  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 61,048 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011


    Victor wrote: »
    Or leave it plugged in at home.

    Only gets over keeping the screen cleared when leaving home. Doesn't solve the keeping warm internally or keeping the screen cleared wherever you're going bits.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,005 ✭✭✭ crushproof


    I was thinking that myself. Driving with zero carbon emissions is far more comfortable and handy than getting unreliable buses and packed trains. But do we really want a country where everybody drives everywhere? It would be like America on steroids. There is a certain quality to public transport and people walking that driving would completely diminish.

    :confused:
    :pac:

    Well, we already are the most car dependant country in the world!:rolleyes:

    Ireland is the most car dependent country in the world. We drive our cars 24,400 kilometres per annum, 70pc more than in France or Germany, 50pc more than in Britain and 30pc more than in the US.
    [HTML]http://www.businessworld.ie/livenews.htm?a=2474920[/HTML]


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,858 paulm17781


    cc wrote: »
    I think hydrogen is the way to go. The infrastructure is in place i.e existing petrol stations, you drive in, fill up and go. Really can't understand the push for plug in electrics.

    That's exactly what the oil companies think too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,110 KevR


    I had a day dream a while back about electric cars. My idea was to have a pole (retractable) on top of all cars which could draw electricity from over-head wires, like electric trains here. The overhead wires would only be on certain busier roads and cars could use electricity to directly power the car and recharge its battery when on roads with overhead lines. People could also recharge their at home or wherever.

    Of course we would have to ban trucks, buses...etc from using roads with the overhead lines and what would happen if someone snagged the power line with their bad driving? :pac:

    EDIT: just thinking about it a little further...obviously the lines and pole from the car would need to be high enough so people couldn't grab it. Maybe just have the lines on long stretches of Motorway (already restrictions) and Dual Carriageways (change law to ban pedestrians/cyclists).

    Thought I'd share my day dream even though it wouldn't be at all practical to implement.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,581 ✭✭✭ jd


    I wonder where these charging points will be. Hardly on the hard shoulder...


  • Registered Users Posts: 140 ✭✭ biblio


    KevR wrote: »
    I had a day dream a while back about electric cars. My idea was to have a pole (retractable) on top of all cars which could draw electricity from over-head wires, like electric trains here. The overhead wires would only be on certain busier roads and cars could use electricity to directly power the car and recharge its battery when on roads with overhead lines. People could also recharge their at home or wherever.

    Of course we would have to ban trucks, buses...etc from using roads with the overhead lines and what would happen if someone snagged the power line with their bad driving? :pac:

    EDIT: just thinking about it a little further...obviously the lines and pole from the car would need to be high enough so people couldn't grab it. Maybe just have the lines on long stretches of Motorway (already restrictions) and Dual Carriageways (change law to ban pedestrians/cyclists).

    Thought I'd share my day dream even though it wouldn't be at all practical to implement.

    Kind of like a trollybus?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,010 Tech3


    jd wrote: »
    I wonder where these charging points will be. Hardly on the hard shoulder...

    On the layby's/rest areas more than likely. Some of them on the newer schemes like below but older ones dont have these.

    DSC03107.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,977 ✭✭✭ Chris_5339762


    But those things are technically illegal :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,110 KevR


    biblio wrote: »
    Kind of like a trollybus?

    Indeed. I had never even seen or heard of a trollybus until you mentioned it and I Googled it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 406 ✭✭ cc


    saw them in Athens a few years ago, reminded me of a poor mans tram though


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