Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email Niamh on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
New AMA with a US police officer (he's back!). You can ask your questions here

Cork - Waterford Rail Link

  • 11-02-2010 5:53pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 116 ✭✭ Son of Stupido


    With the new rail v's road spending ratio to be imposed by the government, what do people think of this project?

    The Cork to Middleton line has been re-opened. The line to Youghal will probably re-open in the future as part of the Cork subburban rail project.

    A 20km new line could be built to connect to the old Dungarvan - Waterford line (substantially still intact). The red Iron bridge could be fixed and connect into Waterford North Station.

    The result would be a direct 100km line from Cork to Waterford, which could offer 1 hour services.

    Is this a project worth considering in the context of improving rail transport in this country?

    thoughts?


«134

Comments

  • Moderators, Education Moderators Posts: 9,365 Mod ✭✭✭✭ mayordenis


    Oh god I would kill to have this, quite literally I would kill, just tell me who.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 61,030 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011


    Lets see how well (or more likely not) the Galway-Limerick services do first before planning other inter-regional city link-ups. Its not like Waterford-Limerick gets much traffic at the moment...

    The missing section of the bridge is sitting on CIE property somewhere around Waterford city, so thats probably the most trivial bit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,657 trishw78


    The Red Iron Bridge has some structural issues that need to be dealth with and the Suir Valley railway is using part of that track. There is a section of the track out near Kilmacthomas that is being converted to some sort of 'nature' rail walk like you find in the UK.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 Judgement Day


    With the new rail v's road spending ratio to be imposed by the government, what do people think of this project?

    The Cork to Middleton line has been re-opened. The line to Youghal will probably re-open in the future as part of the Cork subburban rail project.

    A 20km new line could be built to connect to the old Dungarvan - Waterford line (substantially still intact). The red Iron bridge could be fixed and connect into Waterford North Station.

    The result would be a direct 100km line from Cork to Waterford, which could offer 1 hour services.

    Is this a project worth considering in the context of improving rail transport in this country?

    thoughts?

    Rubbish - one hour would just about bring you from Cork to Youghal. Who would use the service? What's wrong with buses?

    Irish Railway News website this way...http://www.irishrailwaynews.com/


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,278 ✭✭✭ dowlingm


    The Youghal-Dungarvan section has never existed to my knowledge (the previous railway went through Fermoy and Mallow along the Blackwater Valley). What route would you have it take, taking into account the present location of Youghal station and the topography of both Youghal town and the western approach to Dungarvan, both of which I for one am fairly familiar with by numerous trips along N25. I'm not saying this to crap all over the idea, I like it, but let's not pretend the geographic challenges are small ones.

    Let's start small and ask: what should be the point at which an extension east of Midleton should happen (about 15 track miles, I don't have a railway atlas to confirm that). IE should be required to produce a plan for this to show a trigger ridership level at which an extension would happen, and Midleton Urban Council should be surveying those using the carpark to assist IE in identifying commuters better served by easterly station(s) since displacing car commuters from Midleton would help reduce congestion in the station vicinity. From what I understand business on the current service is brisk (although this may be because of people under the illusion that it's a free service).

    The station location is a major problem as the current location on the Strand is ideal for Youghal itself but not an eastern extension and both parking and parking access congestion could be big issues. It's not convenient to the bypass but that's not a showstopper as people coming in from Ardmore could continue to a P&R/passing loop at Killeagh rather than go through the town. I would certainly advocate that train storage in Youghal be part of it to allow late service and early starts rather than deadheading all the way to/from Kent.

    As for Waterford, I can't see the route via Kilmeaden being recreated when Waterford doesn't seem to have enough influence to get proper service on two out of the three lines that are actually open.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 116 ✭✭ Son of Stupido


    yes, the Youghal dungarvan section would be a new build of about 20km, with a reuse of the old lines from cork to youghal and dungarvan to waterford.

    If the government are looking for rail projects to spend their money on, personally I think this is one to consider. Not only does it link two major cities, but it also connects to some commuter towns on the way.

    There would be a significant bit of engineering involved, esp to cross the river at youghal.

    The suir river valley railway could relocate to the new ross line or tramore line.

    I think this project would attract far more customers than the WRC.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,677 ✭✭✭✭ Zebra3


    I think this project would attract far more customers than the WRC.

    That's not saying much. ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,638 Zoney


    I'd say investing in Dublin-Waterford would take precedence in local terms (obviously there are also various projects around the country of greater importance). As regards Cork, well, an extension to Youghal would come first - but as it is the Midleton link is barely up an running any length of time. Plus it's not exactly going to be seaside traffic like of old, and is there much commuting across that distance?

    What about Clonmel? It's quite large - is there much traffic between there and Waterford? If so focussing the existing Limerick-Waterford line on commuter services from Clonmel to Waterford might make sense (and the N24 isn't likely to see investment anytime soon).

    That's just in the area of Cork/Waterford. There are various other rail projects I would draw attention to also, but that would be going off-topic a bit. Also there are the more major projects like speeding up Cork-Dublin, but it's probably more likely we would see smaller investments (and more likely than having none as well, especially if things do pick up in a couple of years time).


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 88,981 ✭✭✭✭ mike65


    Whoever thought this could be a goer clearly knows nothing about the topography of land between Dungarvan and Yougal. Its very hilly and undulating, there is simply no way to run a line short of moving countless millions of tonnes of rock and earth. It would never pay for itself and the Waterford-Dunargavn line would need complete re-engineering - at least two bridges would need rebuilding.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,093 ✭✭✭ hi5


    mike65 wrote: »
    Whoever thought this could be a goer clearly knows nothing about the topography of land between Dungarvan and Yougal. Its very hilly and undulating, there is simply no way to run a line short of moving countless millions of tonnes of rock and earth. It would never pay for itself and the Waterford-Dunargavn line would need complete re-engineering - at least two bridges would need rebuilding.

    Which is probably the reason they didnt go that way in the first place.

    Some interesting maps here.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_rail_transport_in_Ireland


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 116 ✭✭ Son of Stupido


    hi5 wrote: »
    Which is probably the reason they didnt go that way in the first place.

    In 1878......

    engineering and construction have progressed a little in the interveening 140 years, as have demographics and travel


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 88,981 ✭✭✭✭ mike65


    It would be cheaper to fly everyone from Cork to Waterford or vise-versa


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,623 ✭✭✭ Bards


    Zoney wrote: »
    I'd say investing in Dublin-Waterford would take precedence in local terms (obviously there are also various projects around the country of greater importance). As regards Cork, well, an extension to Youghal would come first - but as it is the Midleton link is barely up an running any length of time. Plus it's not exactly going to be seaside traffic like of old, and is there much commuting across that distance?

    What about Clonmel? It's quite large - is there much traffic between there and Waterford? If so focussing the existing Limerick-Waterford line on commuter services from Clonmel to Waterford might make sense (and the N24 isn't likely to see investment anytime soon).

    That's just in the area of Cork/Waterford. There are various other rail projects I would draw attention to also, but that would be going off-topic a bit. Also there are the more major projects like speeding up Cork-Dublin, but it's probably more likely we would see smaller investments (and more likely than having none as well, especially if things do pick up in a couple of years time).

    Exactly, they would be better concetrating on the commuter value rail has over Cars especially coupled with Park & Ride.

    Clonmel, Carrick-on-Suir, New-Ross to Waterford

    They need to have a better timetable to suit commuters and shoppers, more frequent, don't arrive into waterford 10 minutes after the Dublin train has left etc., before embarking on long distance travel by rail which will not lead to a better service than the motorised transport, due to demographics.


  • Registered Users Posts: 116 ✭✭ Son of Stupido


    The purpose of this discussion was of the merits of the proposed project.

    Of course there would be more pressing things to concentrate (i.e. New Ross - Waterford services refd above).

    This proposal is a capital project, one which should not be expected to make a return on (as is the case with 99% of roads). It should be seen in the context of the entire network across the country, i.e linking the 3rd most populous city with the 5th.

    The WRC, whatever about the arguements of who will use it, connects Galway and Limerick. Next step should be to connect (improve) with Cork.

    I think services from the major cities should be a goal, and we are inching towards this.

    In the event of roads money being pumped into major rail projects (which is what is going to happen if you believe the greens) I think this is a project worthy of at least consideration.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,278 ✭✭✭ dowlingm


    You say that engineering has come a long way - in rail terms it really hasn't. Can I take it you have travelled on either or both of the Youghal bypass and the Dungarvan N25 western approach? The grades are substantial, especially in Dungarvan. Wheel-rail ability to negotiate grades really haven't come on all that much since the steam age, nowhere near what cars and buses can take on.

    When you look at the landscape of passenger transportation needs in Ireland, sure Cork-Waterford by rail would be great to have - but it would require heroic engineering when the country badly needs really boring engineering (Pace-Navan, >90mph on the Belfast route, bypass tracks on the North Dublin commuter) and can't get it.

    If you're looking for an Irish megaproject to benefit rail users, consider how to reroute IE away from Bray Head, or even drain the Limerick-Athenry hinterland.


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,221 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    Of course, there is an existing railway between Cork and Waterford. Instead of spending perhaps €500-750 million your suggestion, why not upgrade Limerick Junction-Waterford and Waterford-Cherryville Junction (Kildare) and provide decent rolling stock, which would better connect Waterford to pretty much everywhere. Sure it won't serve Youghal or Dungarvan, but its not as if they have material population weights anyway. Clonmel and Carrick-on Suir would benefit much more.


  • Registered Users Posts: 351 ✭✭ liogairmhordain


    Perhap when the time comes for a new N25 road bridge to be built over the Blackwater (the existing Youghal Bridge is nearly 50 years old and wont last forever) consideration should be given to the feasibility/desirability of running a railway line over the Blackwater as part of the same scheme??


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 Judgement Day


    Perhap when the time comes for a new N25 road bridge to be built over the Blackwater (the existing Youghal Bridge is nearly 50 years old and wont last forever) consideration should be given to the feasibility/desirability of running a railway line over the Blackwater as part of the same scheme??

    Perhaps consideration should also be given to establishing an Irish Space Centre at Sally Perks Funfair too? :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 116 ✭✭ Son of Stupido


    A Cork Waterford link via limerick junction wouldn't work, too much of a diversion, and would take too long.

    A 100km link could see 1 hours services, and make it attractive. Also it would be a hit with the tourists.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 Judgement Day


    A Cork Waterford link via limerick junction wouldn't work, too much of a diversion, and would take too long.

    A 100km link could see 1 hours services, and make it attractive. Also it would be a hit with the tourists.

    What tourists, and coming from where? CIE and the rail operators in the UK have managed to deter foot passengers so successfully that the ferries hardly carry any at all. Even when this situation eventually changes, due to the disappearance of cheap air travel, such a line will never be needed or built.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 368 ✭✭ Roryhy


    What tourists, and coming from where? CIE and the rail operators in the UK have managed to deter foot passengers so successfully that the ferries hardly carry any at all. Even when this situation eventually changes, due to the disappearance of cheap air travel, such a line will never be needed or built.

    The disappearance of cheap air travel? Its here to stay, what would cause you to make such a statement? I take it you are referring to high oil prices, these will hit ferry travel every bit as hard as air travel.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 Judgement Day


    Roryhy wrote: »
    The disappearance of cheap air travel? Its here to stay, what would cause you to make such a statement? I take it you are referring to high oil prices, these will hit ferry travel every bit as hard as air travel.

    Cheap air travel will eventually have to end and domestic tourism (within the British Isles) will return and that is where the ferries will once again come into their own. I don't have an exact date for when sanity is going to sink in regarding cheap air travel but it will. What do you think the planes are going to fly once demand exceeds supply? I love your optimism when you state that cheap air travel is here to stay - how do figure that?:confused:


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 61,030 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011


    Roryhy wrote: »
    I take it you are referring to high oil prices, these will hit ferry travel every bit as hard as air travel.

    Fast cats, yes. Cruise ferries, nowhere near as much as air.

    Even when that does happen, people are unlikely to take the multi-hour Wales->Rosslare or Wales->Cork (should it survive) routes as foot passengers due to the sheer time involved. Any increase in foot passenger traffic due to oil prices is going to be on cruise ferries on Holyhead->Dublin/DL should that ever restart.


  • Registered Users Posts: 368 ✭✭ Roryhy


    There are replacements for jet fuel already developed, that along with airplane efficiency improvements will keep planes in the air. Ferries are too slow and only operate to coasts, peoples lives are getting faster and faster, ferries are for freight, planes are for people.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 Judgement Day


    Roryhy wrote: »
    There are replacements for jet fuel already developed, that along with airplane efficiency improvements will keep planes in the air. Ferries are too slow and only operate to coasts, peoples lives are getting faster and faster, ferries are for freight, planes are for people.

    While not wishing to go on, it seems to have escaped your attention that while people may be living faster and faster lives, since the demise of Concorde they have been travelling slower for the first time in the evolution of powered transport - a portent of things to come?


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 61,030 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011


    Roryhy wrote: »
    There are replacements for jet fuel already developed, that along with airplane efficiency improvements will keep planes in the air. Ferries are too slow and only operate to coasts, peoples lives are getting faster and faster, ferries are for freight, planes are for people.

    Modern security plus baggage handling for 500-people planes (as well as JD's point) means that air travel is slower than ever before.


  • Registered Users Posts: 368 ✭✭ Roryhy


    Points taken but i still don't see a competitive alternative. We'll have to agree to disagree:D


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,093 ✭✭✭ hi5


    While not wishing to go on, it seems to have escaped your attention that while people may be living faster and faster lives since the demise of Concorde they have been travelling slower for the first time in the evolution of powered transport - a portent of things to come?

    A great example of a sentence to show the importance of punctuation:D.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 Judgement Day


    hi5 wrote: »
    A great example of a sentence to show the importance of punctuation:D.

    You have little to amuse you. There must be hundreds of thousands of posts on boards and I'm sure it will keep you busy until eternity nitpicking over grammar and other typos as you examine them all. How about contributing to the discussion instead of going off topic? :p


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 116 ✭✭ Son of Stupido


    Cork - Waterford via Limerick Junction = c.190km
    Cork - Waterford via Mallow = c.150Km
    Cork - Waterford via Youghal = c.100km


This discussion has been closed.
Advertisement