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Photos That Shook The World (Contains graphic images, may cause distress)

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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,226 ✭✭✭✭ Standard Toaster


    Fr. Mychal Judge - first recorded victim of the September 11, 2001 attacks.
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    When the south tower collapsed at 9:59 AM, debris went flying through the north tower lobby, killing many inside, including Judge. At the moment he was struck in the head and killed, Judge was repeatedly praying aloud, "Jesus, please end this right now! God please end this!", according to Judge biographer and New York Daily News columnist Michael Daly. Shortly after his death, firefighters found Judge's body and carried it out of the north lobby. This event was captured in the documentary film 9/11, shot by Jules and Gedeon Naudet. Shannon Stapleton, photographer from Reuters, photographed Judge's body being carried out of the rubble by five men. It became one of the most famous images related to 9/11. The Philadelphia Weekly reports the photograph being called an American Pietà.

    Flight93CraterReuters.jpg
    Flight 93 crater in a field in Pennsylvania.


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    Headlines

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    'The Falling Man'
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    Five years after the horror of September 9, 2001, the falling man has finally been identified as Jonathan Briley, a 43-year-old who worked in a restaurant at the top of the north tower. Over the years, his family has always assumed he perished in the building. Now, learning he had jumped is almost too much to bear.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,226 ✭✭✭✭ Standard Toaster


    http://weburbanist.com/pics/9-11-tribute-128-photos/

    Some more amazing photos (124) from 9 years ago.....9 years...wow.


  • Moderators, Music Moderators Posts: 35,944 Mod ✭✭✭✭ dr.bollocko


    Folks take the CT stuff to the conspiracy theory forum. This is a thread about photos that shook the world.


  • Registered Users Posts: 230 ✭✭ lilminx


    Started looking at this thread a long time ago, but only now have actually gone through all 77 pages. I have sobbed looking at some of these photos (photoseries on young boy with cancer, young girl taken from Oklahoma bomb blast were two that stick in my memory) and am grateful to all posters who put them on here. The interspersed lighthearted photos made me smile, that one of the boy being held aloft by rescuers after Haiti earthquake made my heart soar and that is the image I chose to keep with me as I log out tonight.

    The best thread I have ever taken the time to go through but probably the most harrowing number of hours I have been through in a long time. Humanity baffles me at the best of times, but this just makes me question what is meant by humanity at all.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,227 ✭✭✭ The Highwayman


    First-Flight-across-the-Atlantic-1919.jpg

    first transatlantic flight

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    I have a dream

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    Nazi's march into Paris

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    Liberation of paris

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    Jackie and RFK

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    Rwanda

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT_rhdG4LKi2VUgnpLE1DpqKtdt5YQQQRIReAwamsrGaiBIhZk&t=1&usg=__kPaYX2-EWO4X0xKyqpt3fIom_fk=

    Drumcree

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR9ozNmk_qqG5T5la0Gh6F5_78tKQ0PUloMJwdh2WHHsToqCAo&t=1&usg=__JWN7J-zhtkiPPn89xh1IlRVPBHU=

    Holy Cross Girls' Primary School

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    Drought

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    Live Aid

    Blog_911_Statue_Liberty.jpg

    For the day thats in it


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,808 ✭✭✭✭ chin_grin


    This pic has p*ssed me off for years. It's a perfect example of when "art" overtakes basic human nature.


    Didn't know yer man killed himself. Very sad.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,785 ✭✭✭ phill106


    chin_grin wrote: »
    This pic has p*ssed me off for years. It's a perfect example of when "art" overtakes basic human nature.


    Didn't know yer man killed himself. Very sad.

    Yes, why didnt get just help the child?
    I suppose his thinking was he cant help everyone, but by god he could have helped her.


  • Registered Users Posts: 816 ✭✭✭ gungun


    I presume he took the picture to show the rest of the world how bad it is over there. He most likely helped out after he took this picture. This discussion has been held quite a bit in this tread methinks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,292 ✭✭✭ TangyZizzle


    Yup, over and over. He took around an hour just to take that shot apparently.


  • Registered Users Posts: 895 ✭✭✭ greendragon3


    phew what a thread ! ive spent most of today going through all of the posts on here , unreal . anyway here is my tiny contrabution , a picture of my dad taken from the evening independant august 1979 after the bombing of lord mountbatten in mullaghmore co.sligo
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    [FONT=Verdana, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif][FONT=verdana, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]Sligo Hospital driver Terry Baker (Right) carries an injured Timothy Knatchbull to the ambulance on August 27, 1979. Seeing his father John Brabourne being carried towards him on a stretcher, Timothy fainted instantly. Ironically, the bomb-damaged eye of Timothy was treated by a doctor from Northern Ireland in 2006. (Courtesy: Pacemaker Press International)[/FONT][/FONT]


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  • Registered Users Posts: 33,561 ✭✭✭✭ The_Kew_Tour


    Photo of raids in Gaza strip. Imagine the terror these people had at that moment
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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,359 ✭✭✭ Access


    Ollchailin wrote: »


    This didn't shake the world, but it certainly changed a lot in this country- I will never ever forget this day. I think it showed Ireland in a different light to the world- not just because of the political tones, but also that such a small country could create such an amazing sprts grounds.

    It remains a touchy subject for many people- but my family has been involved with the GAA for all my life & I just cried with pride this day. I was so nervous that something would go wrong, but it didn't. It was such a fantastic day. I actually have tears in my eyes even thinking about it now. I know it's nowhere near as jaw-dropping or as historically significant as most of the other posts here, but it was still an unbelievable event.

    By the way, as has been said before- AMAZING thread. Been going through what I thought was a lot of crap lately, and have now decided that I actually have no idea what it is to suffer :(

    I gotta admit, i think that this was one of Irelands proudest days and i do admit i cried watching this on the day. It was just fantastic to forget about troubles and watch something amazing happen in our lives. I would put it on par with Obama's inaugural speech.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,087 ✭✭✭ Clanket


    Access wrote: »
    I gotta admit, i think that this was one of Irelands proudest days and i do admit i cried watching this on the day. It was just fantastic to forget about troubles and watch something amazing happen in our lives. I would put it on par with Obama's inaugural speech.

    I still get goosebumps when I watch that match. And teary eyed. Every single player that day was immense. No way they were getting beaten by the English in their first visit to Croker since bloody Sunday.

    And for me, it's way way way above Obama's inaugural speech.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,798 ✭✭✭ karma_


    oklo15_curtin.gif


    Photo of the remnants of two billion years old nuclear reactors which were found in Africa.

    more info:
    A natural nuclear fission reactor is a uranium deposit where analysis of isotope ratios has shown that self-sustaining nuclear chain reactions have occurred. The existence of this phenomenon was discovered in 1972 at Oklo in Gabon, Africa by French physicist Francis Perrin. The conditions under which a natural nuclear reactor could exist had been predicted in 1956 by Paul Kuroda.[1] The conditions found were very similar to what was predicted.
    Oklo is the only known location for this in the world and consists of sixteen sites at which self-sustaining nuclear fission reactions took place approximately 2 billion years ago, and ran for a few hundred thousand years, averaging 100 kW of energy output during that time


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,227 ✭✭✭ The Highwayman


    Huh?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,833 ✭✭✭✭ Armin_Tamzarian


    Huh?

    It relates to a naturally occurring "nuclear reactor".


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,706 ✭✭✭✭ Earthhorse


    It relates to a naturally occurring "nuclear reactor".
    Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.

    Huh?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 23,556 ✭✭✭✭ Sir Digby Chicken Caesar




  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 8,495 Mod ✭✭✭✭ artanevilla



    Now I may have jumped to a conclusion here, but the French lads discovery came from Gabon, the one above came from South Africa. Isn't modern man supposed to come from Africa? Is the missing link a nuclear reaction created mutation of an ape?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,752 ✭✭✭ cyrusdvirus


    Nope..... Didn't the survivors of the colonies predominately settle around Africa when they finally got to earth?

    Then Anders took Galactica and the rest of the Fleet into the sun...maybe some sneaky crafty colonials took a reactor or 2 with them....


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,798 ✭✭✭ karma_


    Now I may have jumped to a conclusion here, but the French lads discovery came from Gabon, the one above came from South Africa. Isn't modern man supposed to come from Africa? Is the missing link a nuclear reaction created mutation of an ape?
    In the science fiction novel Bridge of Ashes, by Roger Zelazny, the Gabon mine was stated to have been created by an alien race for the purpose of causing mutations which ultimately led to the existence of humans

    Sounds like an interesting book.


  • Registered Users Posts: 319 ✭✭ netnerd


    Tollund Man

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  • netnerd wrote: »
    The Tollund Man is the naturally mummified corpse of a man who lived during the 4th century BC, during the time period characterised in Scandinavia as the Pre-Roman Iron Age.[1] He was found in 1950 buried in a peat bog on the Jutland Peninsula in Denmark, which preserved his body. Such a find is known as a bog body.[2] The head and face were so well-preserved that he was mistaken at the time of discovery for a recent murder victim

    From Wikipedia. Jeez, that's sorta creepy.


  • Registered Users Posts: 319 ✭✭ netnerd


    Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571, also known as the Andes flight disaster, and in South America as Miracle in the Andes (El Milagro de los Andes) was a chartered flight carrying 45 people, including a rugby team and their friends and family and associates that crashed in the Andes on October 13, 1972. The last of the 16 survivors were rescued on December 23, 1972. More than a quarter of the passengers died in the crash, and several more quickly succumbed to cold and injury. Of the twenty-nine who were alive a few days after the accident, another eight were killed by an avalanche that swept over their shelter in the wreckage.

    The group survived by collectively making a decision to eat flesh from the bodies of their dead comrades. This decision was not taken lightly, as most were classmates or close friends

    uruguayan-air-force-flight6.jpg


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 23,556 ✭✭✭✭ Sir Digby Chicken Caesar




  • Registered Users Posts: 408 ✭✭ questioner




  • Registered Users Posts: 567 ✭✭✭ bigben121






  • questioner wrote: »

    That was beautiful. Have tears in my eyes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 408 ✭✭ questioner


    yeah it was very moving, took a lot of courage to allow a photographer to document it.

    we read and hear so much about cancer that it becomes hard to visualise the impact on ordinary lives it has.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,684 ✭✭✭ Faith+1




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