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Photos That Shook The World (Contains graphic images, may cause distress)

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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,630 ✭✭✭ The Recliner


    Last page or so of chat about video nasties removed, please remember this is a picture thread


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,848 ✭✭✭ bleg


    h01_25367113.jpg

    h27_25379775.jpg

    h29_25364893.jpg


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,798 ✭✭✭ karma_


    What are those pictures depicting?


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 32,675 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    karma_ wrote: »
    What are those pictures depicting?

    recent sludge damage in Hungry i assume?


  • Moderators, Entertainment Moderators Posts: 10,395 Mod ✭✭✭✭ xzanti


    karma_ wrote: »
    What are those pictures depicting?

    http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Five-People-Now-Dead-In-Hungarian-Red-Sludge-Spill-Which-Is-As-Large-As-BP-Oil-Disaster/Article/201010215754376?lpos=World_News_Carousel_Region_0&lid=ARTICLE_15754376_Five_People_Now_Dead_In_Hungarian_Red_Sludge_Spill_Which_Is_As_Large_As_BP_Oil_Disaster_
    Five people have now died in a toxic sludge spill in Hungary thought to be equivalent in size to the Gulf of Mexico oil disaster.
    The figures have been recalculated by the government officials who estimate that 600,000 to 700,000 cubic metres (158 million to 184 million gallons) of sludge escaped and inundated three villages before entering the Danube on Thursday.

    The BP oil spill amounted to more than 200 million gallons (757,000 cubic metres).

    Greenpeace are warning the waste contains "surprisingly high" levels of arsenic and mercury, according to reports.

    Charity representatives said detected arsenic concentration is twice that normally found in so-called red mud.

    Analysis of water in a canal also found arsenic levels 25 times the limit for drinking water.

    However, Hungary's interior minister Sandor Pinter said: "There is no risk of a biological or environmental catastrophe in the Danube river as alkalinity levels have declined."

    Seriously, turn on your tele ;)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,848 ✭✭✭ bleg


    1st picture looks like something out of Fallout.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,848 ✭✭✭ bleg


    20090830-eekbjcpgg2e1ktm6mq7n9c787h.jpg


    The first photo of a molecule.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 15,663 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Manic Moran


    Colour photo shown earlier, here's one with moar tank.

    Though not as well known as the Cuban Missile Crisis a year later, arguably these 18 hours in 1961 were the closest that we came to WWIII.

    checkpointcharliesml1.jpg

    NTM


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,193 ✭✭✭ [Jackass]


    hiroshima_shadow.jpg

    docu13s.jpg

    h12_22.jpg

    The aftermath of the Hiroshima bombing in world war two.

    The flash from the nuclear explosion was so intense that it burnt the shadows of it's victims permanently into the rock.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,225 ✭✭✭✭ Standard Toaster


    ^^^
    First 2 already posted by myself on page 8
    Still gives me the willys looking at them.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 552 ✭✭✭ Sharkey 10


    Wow those pictures of the permanent shadows are crazy , but im struglling getting my head round how they became permanent . Could someone explain this to me? Is it just because the light was so bright or what?


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,225 ✭✭✭✭ Standard Toaster


    Sharkey 10 wrote: »
    Wow those pictures of the permanent shadows are crazy , but im struglling getting my head round how they became permanent . Could someone explain this to me? Is it just because the light was so bright or what?

    Yeah basically the heat. More specifically thermal radiation.
    The heat of the blast, estimated at 3000-4000 degrees celsius immediately below the explosion, was sufficient to melt glass bottles such as these, which were 900 meters away.

    n522bp.jpg

    "Shadows" were left behind where objects shielded a surface from the heat.

    Where this happened, the shadow is the original color of the surface, and the area outside the shadow has been turned to a different color by the intense temperatures. Because thermal radiation travels more or less in a straight line from the fireball (unless scattered) any opaque object will produce a protective shadow

    By measuring the angles of the shadows it was possible to establish the exact location of the explosion.

    2z9fq8o.jpg

    All taken from here and here.
    You have more then a nice tan if you were near any of these bombs, which many thousands were.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,543 ✭✭✭ JerryHandbag


    ^^ Extraordinary stuff


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,047 ✭✭✭ rebel10


    ^^ Extraordinary stuff
    Two years ago i went to Hiroshima. Scary. The museum there is obviously full of pictures like these, but what shocked me the most were the pictures and stories of people who survived the attack. You can imagine the state of these poor people if thats what happened to glass bottles.:(


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,471 ✭✭✭ majiktripp


    b4d79b43635bfbf10de03dec2e9f2d15.jpeg

    I'm sure there will be many more of these photo's to come, the first Chilean miner rescued after two months underground. Fantastic job they have done carrying out the rescue (so far) - Good to see a nation rally together to help people like this.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 45 Chorizo


    Heres a link to 13 photos that changed the world. They have probably been posted here before but it has the stories to go with them. Nice read.

    http://www.neatorama.com/2007/01/02/13-photographs-that-changed-the-world/


  • Registered Users Posts: 285 ✭✭ MWoods


    Well know photo of the man that defined comedy movies

    bfi-00m-lky.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,457 ✭✭✭ Queen-Mise


    year_in_pictures_07.jpg

    Another step in Big Brother watching us all. Orwell's 1984 is that bit closer.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,477 ✭✭✭✭ Raze_them_all


    09/04/28??

    Maybe that time machine thread in ah isn that far fetched


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,983 ✭✭✭ Tea_Bag


    just managed to go through this thread, it took a few days, and i ended up not studying for a chemistry mid term because of how absorbing it is, but totally worth it.

    Thanks everyone.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,565 ✭✭✭ southsiderosie


    I am always amazed by civil rights-era photographs, because it is hard to imagine a time where Jim Crow-type policies just seemed normal. They are also interesting because the protesters were always very calm and dignified - the result of hours of training. You were not allowed to participate unless organizers trusted you to keep your cool and only offer passive resistance in the face of atrocious police brutality.

    Police setting dogs on peaceful civil rights protester, Birmingham Alabama, 1961

    dogs-1268737376.jpeg

    Water hoses were also used

    birmingham.jpg

    Famous shot of King; his Letter from a Birmingham Jail remains one of the most important and beautifully written justifications for civil disobedience in modern history.

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    During the "Freedom Summer" of 1964, young white college students joined their black counterparts in Mississippi in a voter registration drive.

    Struggle-1.jpg

    Not only did they face threats and harassment, but three volunteers disappeared in the first few weeks of the campaign. Their bodies were later found inside a clay dam.

    BE047268.jpg

    These images and this murder led to a political tipping point; the Civil Rights Act became law the next months, and the Voting Rights Act came into effect a year later. Below you can see Martin Luther King Jr. behind Lyndon Johnson as he signs the Civil Rights Act into law.

    civil-rights-act-of-1964.jpg

    We still have a lot of problems in the US, but we have come a long way in the last 50 years.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,565 ✭✭✭ southsiderosie


    Sorry to double-post, but this thread is awesome and I really love photography! I'm surprised I haven't seen much of Diane Arbus or W. Eugene Smith. Arbus' work was often quite startling because of her focus on people who were living on the margins of society. In particular, her photos of disabled and mentally retarded people were shocking at a time when these things were not often talked about, much less portrayed in print or the media. One of her most famous photos was "A young Brooklyn family going for a Sunday outing NYC, 1966"

    figure1_arbus.jpg

    I'm surprised this one hasn't come up yet, but W. Eugene Smith's photo "Tomoko Uemura in Her Bath" was the most famous image from a series highlighting the terrible effects of industrial mercury poisoning. Here a mother is seen bathing her daughter who was born severely desabled as a result of exposure to mercury run-off from a nearby plant.

    14.jpg

    Although they are quite different, both of these photographs derive much of their emotional power because they echo traditional Christian religious icons: the Madonna and Child and the Pieta.

    4294844418_a2a4f7f331.jpgmadonna-and-child-usha-n.jpg

    14.jpgpieta0.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,706 ✭✭✭✭ Earthhorse


    Jesus Christ! This world!


  • Registered Users Posts: 957 ✭✭✭ GrizzlyMan


    shoichi-yokoi.jpg

    Yokoi's first haircut in 28 years; but the image is also a document of his first ordinary contact with another person and a step in the transformation from solitary soldier to the role of celebrity.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoichi_Yokoi



    On January 24, 1972, two hunters captured a Japanese soldier who had been hiding in the jungles of Guam since the American forces took the island in 1944. His name was Shoichi Yokoi, and in the summer of 1944, he had retreated into the jungle rather than surrender, and had been there ever since. He resided in a cave he had dug from a bamboo thicket, and lived on a diet of nuts, mangos, papaya, breadfruit, snails, and rats.




  • british-football-nazi-salute.jpg

    English football team gives nazi salute 1938.

    Not as big impacting, but never the less interesting - in the same year, Adolf Hitler was voted as Time Magazine Man of the Year; he has received this honour alongside Barrack Obama, Bill Clinton, Richard Nixon. Amazing to think that the pretty much the following year, he would more or less declare war on the world. Nobody saw it coming.

    [IMG]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v353/Lucca Incalculable Finch/hitler_time.jpg[/IMG]


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,827 ✭✭✭ Donny5


    Not as big impacting, but never the less interesting - in the same year, Adolf Hitler was voted as Time Magazine Man of the Year; he has received this honour alongside Barrack Obama, Bill Clinton, Richard Nixon. Amazing to think that the pretty much the following year, he would more or less declare war on the world. Nobody saw it coming.

    To say nobody saw it coming is simply wrong. Many people forsaw the war; if not it's scale, then it's particants. Time's Man of the Year is not an honour, either. It's simply given to the person they think has been the most influential in the given year. It is not given on merit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,092 ✭✭✭ CiaranMT


    Donny5 wrote: »
    To say nobody saw it coming is simply wrong. Many people forsaw the war; if not it's scale, then it's particants. Time's Man of the Year is not an honour, either. It's simply given to the person they think has been the most influential in the given year. It is not given on merit.

    moot from 4chan being an obvious, but entertaining example.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,833 ✭✭✭✭ Armin_Tamzarian


    Donny5 wrote: »
    Time's Man of the Year is not an honour, either. It's simply given to the person they think has been the most influential in the given year. It is not given on merit.

    True, Stalin was Time's Man of the Year twice.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,881 ✭✭✭ mle1324


    freddie6.jpg


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,419 ✭✭✭ allanb49


    mle1324 wrote: »
    freddie6.jpg[IMG][/img]



    19 years as of the 24th November.


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