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Buying knives

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  • Nesbits have a store on Moore Street if you’re in Dublin. You can test the knives there and then if you want. :)




  • Nisbets are quite expensive (their site prices exclude VAT). Wusthof would be an excellent brand with a great reputation.

    But I would also second going to the Zwilling shop in Kildare village - They will have both Zwilling (professional) and Henkel (home range) and some of the block sets can be very well priced




  • Zwilling also do some magnetic blocks so you can build your own set rather than having to buy one of the pre made sets.




  • Antony Bourdain advises Global knives. If I remember correctly he preferred Japanese knives to European knives as better value and easier to maintain. There is a chapter in Kitchen Confidential about it. This is an article about it.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.thekitchn.com/anthony-bourdains-favorite-chefs-knife-251541%3famp=1

    We have Zwilling at home and they are grand however I'm not known to take care of kitchen equipment. OH buys them and I destroy them. :D




  • ***
    mollybird I've merged this with the Buying Knives megathread because there is some excellent advice here already, and some posters who know a huge amount about knives follow this thread :)


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  • OK, here's my tuppenny ha'pence.

    I love knives, have more than you could shake a big stick at. Outdoor knives, survival knives, hunting knives, bushcraft knives. Knives, knives, knives. Cold Steel, Esse, Enzo, custom, Aaron Gough. I say this in the hope you appreciate what I'm going to say.

    You don't need a set. 95% of my knife work in the kitchen is done with a Global Oriental Chef's Knife. 2% is with Victorinox serrated paring knife. It'll give you 99 slices of tomato. The other 3% is with other knives because they are there.
    Realistically a Victorinox Fibrox Chef's knife is going to do the job as good as or better than most of the sexy knives available. And as someone who was a barman in a fair few places with kitchens its what most chefs use.

    Learn to sharpen. I recommend a waterstone of 3000 grit and a little and often approach. Three licks each side before and after using.

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.





  • Same here re: knives. Me and my pal Gordon Ramsey (joke) say you only need two knives: an 8" cooks knife, and a breadknife. And maybe a small paring knife if you want.
    I've bought loads of knives over the years, but now I only use one: a Wusthof Classic 8" without the bumpy thing at the start of the blade (makes it far easier to sharpen).
    Make sure you buy the magnetic scabbard with it.
    I bought a Wusthof 3000/8000 water stone along with the knife. Pricey but good.
    I learned sharpening techniques on Youtube videos.
    I sharpen the knife about once every six weeks and it'll slice paper, shave my arm, etc.
    During lockdown we went vegetarian for a couple of months until we got fed up of the taste of vegetables. But vegetarian living involved a huge amount of slicing and dicing! It is an absolute pleasure to have have a well-balanced and sharp knife to do the work.
    Obviously there are lots of brands other than the above-mentioned, and I would highly recommend any serious cook to get yourself a quality 8" knife along with the neans to keep it sharp.




  • Hi all

    Has anyone bought from www.knivesandtools.ie before and have any feedback? They website says they dispatch from the Netherlands so it should be fine from a VAT/customs perspective.

    Looking to buy a Wusthof classic 7 piece set.

    Thanks!




  • Feisar wrote: »
    Realistically a Victorinox Fibrox Chef's knife is going to do the job as good as or better than most of the sexy knives available. And as someone who was a barman in a fair few places with kitchens its what most chefs use.

    Learn to sharpen. I recommend a waterstone of 3000 grit and a little and often approach. Three licks each side before and after using.

    Great advice. I'd add learn to use a steel too. I was a butcher many moons ago and always used Victorinox. I still have and use the steak and boning knife in the kitchen. Both are about 25 years old!! Using the steel properly will save using the stone so much. It also lets you set the direction of the edge which is a huge help cutting soft veg/fruit and will stop a knife digging into a bone.




  • fergpie wrote: »
    Hi all

    Has anyone bought from www.knivesandtools.ie before and have any feedback? They website says they dispatch from the Netherlands so it should be fine from a VAT/customs perspective.

    Looking to buy a Wusthof classic 7 piece set.

    Thanks!

    I'd be wary of a site that said it was a .ie, yet dispatched the goods from the Netherlands.
    Customer service is from a UK phone number.

    If you scroll to the bottom of the page, you'll see a load of international knivesandtools sites. They're part of Kato Group:
    https://www.katogroup.eu/
    Katogroup currently has nine native web shops in seven different countries proudly wearing the name of Knivesandtools.
    International player that offers an extensive range of kitchen and outdoor tools.


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  • Bought from them a couple of times, pre brexit, orders shipped from the EU - not UK - and they used UPS. Delivery was within a week of ordering. Had no issues so can’t comment on their customer service. Would have ordered from them again this year but the knife I wanted was sold by Amazon.de as well and was on offer.




  • fergpie wrote: »
    Hi all

    Has anyone bought from www.knivesandtools.ie before and have any feedback?
    I was pleased with them, price, ordering, packaging and delivery time. I recommended them to someone I know who also had no complaints.
    tangy wrote: »
    I'd be wary of a site that said it was a .ie, yet dispatched the goods from the Netherlands.
    I noticed that too and found it odd but they just have various addresses like .co.uk .de so just bought them up.

    A bit of searching made me certain they were good and selling legit stuff. I like the site as they seem to only stock decent stuff, they give a good explanation as to why they do not sell ceramic knives.




  • I’ve bought of knives and tools a few times, never any issues. Just got a Cold Steel Ultimate Hunter of them, was delivered Friday.

    Was thinking I may have come of as dismissive in my previous post. If you want to buy a sexy knife or set work away, I was just saying above a certain price point yer buying a luxury item and not a tool.

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.





  • Friends of mine will only use Zwillig or Wursthoff and swear by them. I'm no pro but I personally don't see the need. I use Ikea knives, the Vorda Santoqu has a great feel to it I have a few and very happy. What I like to point out is they use the same steel as theirs at 10x the price. As long as you keep your knives really sharp - i'm not sure I see the value in paying so much.

    What am I missing?




  • It all comes down to personal choice and preference. Nothing wrong with using a fancy Wusthof or using a knife from Dunnes if it does the job. Just make sure it's sharp. If your choice suits you it'll still get the job done once it's looked after.




  • Zascar wrote: »
    Friends of mine will only use Zwillig or Wursthoff and swear by them. I'm no pro but I personally don't see the need. I use Ikea knives, the Vorda Santoqu has a great feel to it I have a few and very happy. What I like to point out is they use the same steel as theirs at 10x the price. As long as you keep your knives really sharp - i'm not sure I see the value in paying so much.

    What am I missing?

    It's not really the same steel. It's just the same "recipe" for steel. Ikea ones likely made in China.

    It's a different business model. The Ikea ones are all about volume, cheap to buy and cheap to replace. Expensive knives will keep their edge much better, higher quality handles etc.




  • Zascar wrote: »

    What am I missing?

    I think you're missing the point 😂 as above, quality, material, weight and weight distribution...




  • Worked as a butcher for 25 years and the stand-out knife in all that time was my Gustav Emil Ern.

    In the latter years I was introduced to the wonders of the 'multicut' steel (a Dick, I think). For those who think a steel cannot be used to sharpen, think again!

    I can virtually guarantee that using these two in combination will yield an orgasmic edge of the tantric variety.




  • In the latter years I was introduced to the wonders of the 'multicut' steel (a Dick, I think). For those who think a steel cannot be used to sharpen, think again!

    I can virtually guarantee that using these two in combination will yield an orgasmic edge of the tantric variety.

    Was that the blue handled square one with 2 rough sides and the other totally smooth? I couldn't go back to a regular steel after using it.

    Also I remember Sheffield Steel knives being terrible in the early 90's. The boning knives were very brittle and always chipped or snapped with heavy use.




  • Yes, since Brexit I do buy from Knivesandtools.ie and Lamnia, good lads, but the wait is more than Heinnie Haynes (OG knife dealers) ever inflicted on me!

    The Ikea Santoku quoted above is a grand knife, but "stainless steel" tells me nothing about what it's made from.

    The massive bolster will also tend to make it sharpen like a recurve blade, killing the rock chopping action some people value.

    Ikea used to make a very nice Chef's knife, no bolster, from VG10 steel.

    That's a decent stainless orders of magnitude "better" than 440C or other common stainless cutlery steels.

    Anyone who's seen my posts know I like me some Japanese Steels, and some high tech "Super" steels.

    My latest kitchen knife was a Zwilling Diplome mono steel offering made in Japan by Miyabi.

    Japanese tech in a more German or French pattern blade.

    Very nice to cut with, more handle balanced than blade, my young lad would like this in a slightly shorter blade (there are three lengths available).

    For keeping an edge touched up I like a Ceramic "steel" and go easy with it!

    For sharpening I like a 1,000 and 6,000 grit JIS (japanese) standard waterstone.

    For fixing damage I have some coarse diamonds, I have diamonds up to EEF DMT as well, for harder high carbide steels.

    I enjoy using waterstones, and my Edge Pro, and a belt grinder if needed...different jobs need different solutions.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Basic kit I would start with is a (Victorinox/F. Dick/Other basic but decent make) Chef's knife around 8", a good serrated knife for bread or carving duties, a paring knife for peeling stuff.

    A ceramic rod for touch ups

    A 1,000 grit (JIS) waterstone for sharpening (little and often)

    Decent set of pots and pans

    A good end grain cutting board (TK Max I got mine)

    Speciality knives like boning, fillet, cleaver as needed later.

    Thermopen or a bluetooth temp probe to cook to an internal temp, also good for the barbie

    Mandolin for shredding fingertips (great for potato gratin or coleslaw)

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Better knives once you know what you like and what works

    More stones to take care of the knives

    Maybe a guided system to take human error out somewhat, Edge Pro, Wicked Edge, Hapstone, TSPROF, KME, Work Sharp (the Work Sharp looks a nice little kit for reasonable money).

    Ceramics like Spyderco Tri-Angle

    Stropping compounds (I've just gotten into Gunny Juice, deionised diamond pastes, he also makes a Graphene lubricant), Jende, Richmond, Starkie, Dialux

    Diamond stones for super hard exotic steels (Venev are my new coarse stones, otherwise Eze-Lap and DMT)

    Magnetic tool strip from Lidl to hold my knives up high, away from the kids

    Belt grinder for sharpening and repairing the neighbours knives, lawnmower blades, shovels, clippers

    Edge Pro attachment for shears and scissors, may as well...



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  • I've never found a sharpening system that works for me.

    I tried stones but they just didn't work for me - perhaps I bought crappy stones or perhaps my technique was poor. I borrowed a spiderco system and wasn't impressed, either - maybe it was a bit worn out - or maybe it was technique, again?

    I currently use a combo of a metal steel, a pull through thing that is really just 2 angled steels and another pull through v type thing with a course v and a ceramic v. Using various combos of these, I get a reasonable edge but not as I'd like and the v thing is probably pretty harsh on the blades. I don't have high end knives. I have a cheap Japanese sandoku which I love and various paring knives (mostly victoriaknox) and a few Analon knives. Perhaps, I'm just expecting too much from these knives?

    Anyway, on your recommendation (no pressure😃), I've just ordered the Work Sharp guided sharpener. We'll see how I get on with this.





  • I currently use a combo of a metal steel, a pull through thing that is really just 2 angled steels and another pull through v type thing with a course v and a ceramic v. Using various combos of these, I get a reasonable edge but not as I'd like and the v thing is probably pretty harsh on the blades.

    These pull through sharpeners are knife eaters, they are usually carbide and shave steel off your knives. The abrasion is also along the edge, where it's better at 90 degrees to your edge.

    I don't have high end knives. I have a cheap Japanese sandoku which I love and various paring knives (mostly victoriaknox) and a few Analon knives.

    Perhaps, I'm just expecting too much from these knives?

    Not at all, all knives can be made sharp, how well they hold that edge is down to geometry and heat treat (hardness).

    Victorinox and F. Dick knives have served me well, and still do. The Japanese and other exotic stuff is thinner, harder, smaller carbides, yadda yadda, does the same thing but a bit "more" in some aspects. They cut well and polish up nice, they don't make me a better cook or even a better food prepper! I can't do that speed cutting stuff, I just wince at how hard they whack the edge on the cutting surface.

    Anyway, on your recommendation (no pressure😃), I've just ordered the Work Sharp guided sharpener. We'll see how I get on with this.

    This at least removes some variables, the cutting action of the stones is 90 degrees to your edge, the angle is set and constant, once you apex the edge (raise a small burr) you can flip the knife and do the exact same to the other side.

    The options are starting to come to use more specialised stones, tapes, diamonds..... they are all just abrasives to grind an edge.

    How refined you feel you want to go is up to you and the performance.

    That's often forgotten, a toothy 400 grit edge will bite into a tomato skin better than a mirror polished 60,000 grit edge. The mirror edge is sharp, but what performance improvement is it bringing? I do like a mirror polish just because, but really most commercial knives get a 220 grit edge and a buff on a strop or buffing wheel...job done.

    Well wear on the Work Sharp, it should be a major step up from the pull through edges!

    Since I recommended it, if you are actually unhappy with how it works after a testing period, I will buy it from you so you don't suffer a loss.

    I don't expect you will be unhappy with it, but I'd hate to see you stuck with another piece of kit you don't feel does what you want it to do.

    If you still have the sharpening stones, I might have some videos up on Youtube that might help with those, or I can record some if it would help.






  • I got 3 on the left about 6 months ago and I'm very happy with them. I'm set for life with knives now I believe. Wusthoff Classic Ikon.





  • That's an extremely kind offer, Deise, but I'm really happy with the Work Sharp guided system, so far.

    I sharpened the three knives that I use most to an edge that I am very happy with and they seem to be maintaining it pretty well with just the odd rub of a steel. I'd imaging that the basic system will do me fine - I don't see the need for the finer stones/rods or abrasives. I'm just happy to have a decent edge on my knives.



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