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Buying knives

  • 01-02-2008 7:10pm
    #1
    Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,315 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Faith


    Every few weeks, there’s a thread in here by someone wanting to buy a good knife/set of knives. Rather than answering the same questions over and over again, I’ve compiled this following information from previous threads.

    Many chefs will recommend that you just need one good knife. Want to know more? Read here. The most important aspect of the knife is that they feel good in your hand. Once you have the knife (or knives), you need to be able to keep it sharp. For everything you want to know about sharpening knives, read here. Basically, you’ll need a stone and a diamond steel. Use the stone to sharpen the knife about once a week, and the diamond steel to hone it before use every time. There’s no point in spending loads of money on a knife if you’re not going to look after it!

    So, what brands should you be looking for? Fellow boardsies recommend the following:

    Victorinox – a good starter knife. They’re not too expensive and they’re great for getting started with.

    Wustof – a very popular german range.

    Henckles (also known as Zwilling) – comparable to Wustof.

    Global – far cheaper in Australia if you happen to be visiting soon!

    Now, where can you get them? Unfortunately, Dublin is the centre of the boards.ie universe, so most places will be there.


    Sweeney O’Rourke
    on Pearse Street are commonly recommended for Wustofs. You can also buy them online, but beware of fakes. For authentic online sellers, look here.

    Brown Thomas stock Wustof and Global.

    Rory Conner, in Bantry, West Cork makes knives. His website is: http://www.roryconnerknives.com/

    And occasionally you might find a bargain in TK Maxx.

    This post is far from complete and I’m sure others who know much more than I do will chip in with some useful advice below.


«13456711

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 704 ✭✭✭ Dero


    For anyone who's interested how to sharpen kitchen knives, here's a great article that goes into great detail, but is easy to understand and digest. It is also targeted towards kitchen knives, rather than hunting knives or anything else.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,425 rockbeer


    Japanese knives are some of the best you can buy.

    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/ do a wide selection, good service and cheap delivery.


  • Registered Users Posts: 37,243 ✭✭✭✭ Mellor


    I'm looking to get a decent prep knife,
    should i go multi-use knife, or a chefs type prep knife?


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 10,561 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Mr Magnolia


    Hope you don't mind me putting this here Faith. It's for my own use as much as everyone else :)

    I've just purchased an End Grain Butchers Block which I intend to use for every day food preparation.


    Maintenance:

    Only wash your board by hand using hot water and an anti-bacterial soap. Adding a little bleach or vinegar to the water will aid the killing of bacteria. Rubbing the board with half a lemon will also help kill off unwanted bacteria. Never immerse or soak the board. After washing you should dry it immediately. Failure to follow these guidelines can cause your board to warp, which will render it useless.

    Don't allow liquid to stand on the board for any length of time. This can cause discolouration, warping and can even weaken the glue.

    Try and work with all areas of the board to ensure it wears evenly thus prolonging its use.

    Store the board away from any source of direct heat. Oil your board regularly using a mineral oil, allow the oil to dry fully into the board.

    TYP_RectChop20422_300pix.JPG

    Trouble Shooting:

    Cracking or splitting can be caused by your board drying out you need to oil it more.

    Warping can be caused by over-exposure to liquids. Apply loads of oil to the concave side daily until the board levels.

    Staining use a light sand-paper then oil liberally. Rub the sand paper with the grain not against it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,949 ✭✭✭✭ the beer revolu


    I've recently discovered Analon knives.

    Really nice and they come with a rigid plastic sheath which is a knife saver if you keep your knives in a drawer.

    Available in Meadow's and Byrne
    and Debenhams


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  • Registered Users Posts: 213 ✭✭ mildews


    Does anyone know if there is a place in Dublin where I can buy Ceramic Knives made by Kyocera?
    Thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 53 ✭✭✭ paddyenglishman


    i bought my knives online from Mr Moritaki A japanese maker
    Good quality traditional japanese knives nothing fancy but scarily sharp . i'll never buy another western knife again. They are carbon steel and rust like mad , so they need lots of care and attention ,but you can shave a balloon with them!
    If you buy there may be a tax cost involved unless its under $100 dollars .
    buy direct from a maker , don't get fleeced in Dublin
    .http://park12.wakwak.com/~moritaka/list_en.html
    i have no connection to this guy but his knives are great value


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 18,300 ✭✭✭✭ Seaneh


    I've used a 9" Wusthof Gourmet Cooks Knife,4.5" Wushtof Gourmet Paring Knifeand a 7.5" Wusthof Gourmet Filet/sandwich knife for about 3 years now and they are by far the best I've ever used, the Global blades are are as good but the handles are rubbish and you end up with a blister on the outside of your index finger if you use it for lenght of time, I know a few chefs using them and every one of them has a big ugly callus on the spot im talking about, I had to work short notice one day, forgot my knifes and had to use another chefs global 10"cooks knife for the day and it wrecked my head all day.

    That's just my input though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,658 ✭✭✭✭ The Sweeper


    Funny you say that Seaneh, I use global knives and indeed I have the 'chopping callus' on my index finger, on mine it's palm side, just above the crease where the palm and index finger join. Didn't realise it was a Global-wide phenomenon!

    I'd swear by the knives themselves for sharpness and because personally I like their weight and balance but up to now I just thought the callus/blister thing was something that only happened to me!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 286 ✭✭ SnowMonkey


    rockbeer wrote: »
    Japanese knives are some of the best you can buy.

    I use japanses steel it is the best its the sharpist strongist most reliable, stays sharper for longer and its Japanese and they make super knives comfortable to i like them a lot :cool:


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,180 ✭✭✭ donnacha


    Anybody know much about spitzenklasse - I spotted a 8" knife up in tkmaxx and it was reduced from €119 to €29. It looks really nice but I'm not finding much online about them - can advise if this is good value and of course a decent knife?


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 40,053 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Sparks


    Anyone know if there's anywhere in Dublin where you can get your knives professionally sharpened/reground?


  • Registered Users Posts: 542 ✭✭✭ mfield


    i bought my knives online from Mr Moritaki A japanese maker
    Good quality traditional japanese knives nothing fancy but scarily sharp . i'll never buy another western knife again. They are carbon steel and rust like mad , so they need lots of care and attention ,but you can shave a balloon with them!
    If you buy there may be a tax cost involved unless its under $100 dollars .
    buy direct from a maker , don't get fleeced in Dublin
    .http://park12.wakwak.com/~moritaka/list_en.html
    i have no connection to this guy but his knives are great value

    Might get one of these. How do you sharpen that, same as any knife?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,405 NewFrockTuesday


    Didn't realise it was a Global-wide phenomenon!



    *groans*


    :pac:


    I love the Wurstof. I agree re the Global, stopped using them years ago. I never found the handles comfortable. I love the frimness of the grip on the Wuffys.

    I was at Catex a few weeks ago - the chef equivelent of a fairground - and there was a brand of knife Id never heard of before - Dick (I kid you not). Has anyone used these? They were like Wuffys had taken Victorinox out to dinner got plastered and had a lovechild knife :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 53 ✭✭✭ paddyenglishman


    sharpen the same as any knife , i ve had mine for over a year now and i can still shave with them . ok i'm only a domestic cook but to put up with the abuse i give them its impressive. They are carbon steel and will rust if you do not oil them .I still reckon they are good value , hand made and soulful but very traditional japanese.
    Dave


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 53 ✭✭✭ Dockfive


    I recently got a set of global knives as a present and love them. Thankfully haven't had any trouble with the handles as some poster have noted.

    Got a minosharp watersharpener to go with them. Is this the way to go sharpening wise and how often should I sharpen them?

    Thanks


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 18,300 ✭✭✭✭ Seaneh


    I sharper my knives before every use (so pretty much ever day) and then sometimes during th day I'll have to give my cooks knife another rub at some stage, I find it best to keep op top of it to avoid losing the edge.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 53 ✭✭✭ Dockfive


    Thanks Seaneh. I was under the impression that it was best not to get them to the sharpener too often, once every few months? Makes sense I suppose though.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 18,300 ✭✭✭✭ Seaneh


    The way I see it is this, Knives are tools, carpenters sharpen their toiols before every use, so we should sharpen ours before every use.


  • Registered Users Posts: 142 ✭✭ niamh86


    Hey

    I'm using Shun knives at the moment, absolutely love them. Got a great deal on them in America last time i was there, anyone know anywhere in Ireland they stock them? Preferably Dublin. I could do with a few more.


    Thanks


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,425 rockbeer


    Seaneh wrote: »
    The way I see it is this, Knives are tools, carpenters sharpen their toiols before every use, so we should sharpen ours before every use.

    I think it depends on what you're cutting and on what surface. Carpenters are cutting wood all the time which is much harder on an edge than - say - tomato - but less so than bone.

    A quick once over with the diamond steel will keep the edge keen, but every time you sharpen the knife you take some of the edge away so oversharpening will shorten the life of the tool. I tend to use the diamond steel a few times a week and only get the waterstones out every couple of months.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,405 NewFrockTuesday


    Ive never worked with the waterstone. My Dad does the heavy duty sharpening - hes brilliant with it. He has flats and rounds and they vary from almost fine sandpaper texture rough to velvet smooth. He has a real knack for it. He does the knives in the restaurant - and you could split hairs with them after.

    I use the diamond steel for a quick once over before every session. I dont expect my knives to last forever - Im lucky if I get a year and a half from a chopper. Veg knives are nearly disposable at this stage as theyre so cheap and carvers last about 2 years serated and a year non. I just cant bring myself to throw out knives that I paid a fortune for though...so I have a collection of them in the bottom drawer. Iys like my own little elephants graveyard...a history of my cooking :)


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 18,300 ✭✭✭✭ Seaneh


    rockbeer wrote: »
    I think it depends on what you're cutting and on what surface. Carpenters are cutting wood all the time which is much harder on an edge than - say - tomato - but less so than bone.

    A quick once over with the diamond steel will keep the edge keen, but every time you sharpen the knife you take some of the edge away so oversharpening will shorten the life of the tool. I tend to use the diamond steel a few times a week and only get the waterstones out every couple of months.


    I ment i use a steel everyday.
    I leave my wetstone at home and only use it in extreme situations, ie, if ive bene using a boning knife all day it will need it badly or if i've been prepping chicken for a few hours my cooks knife will need it but normally i stay away from the thing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 183 ✭✭ ManwitaPlan


    Got myself a wusthoff cooks knife today and was just wondering how important is the quality of the honing steel?

    I have an old one at home I got with a cheap set and was wondering would this be ok to use?

    Didnt want to fork out 30 odd quid on a steel tbh.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,946 ✭✭✭ Mike Litoris


    Got myself a wusthoff cooks knife today and was just wondering how important is the quality of the honing steel?

    I have an old one at home I got with a cheap set and was wondering would this be ok to use?

    Didnt want to fork out 30 odd quid on a steel tbh.

    A cheap (usually rough) steel will ruin your blade. Do yourself and your knife a favour and invest in a good one.


  • Registered Users Posts: 183 ✭✭ ManwitaPlan


    Cheers,

    I picked up one of these to sharpen the knife http://www.accusharp.com/

    Would I be better of with a good steel instead of that? (I know the steel technically doesnt sharpen but I would'nt be doing heavy duty stuff with the knife and Id be using it infrequently)

    The reason I was reluctant to buy a steel was I would be afraid I would get the angle wrong and ruin the blade.

    Has anybody ever used one of those accusharp tools?


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 40,053 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Sparks


    Still wondering if there's anywhere in Dublin you can go to get a knife properly reground - I've a sabatier or two that are really past the whetstone stage at this point.

    On the nice-looking knife point, got a beautiful new Tojiro Senkou vegetable knife as a gift this year:
    sk-6312.jpg
    Beautiful thing, looks georgous, wonderful edge and heft. And I've only lost a third of a fingernail to it so far :D


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 10,561 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Mr Magnolia


    Sparks wrote: »
    Still wondering if there's anywhere in Dublin you can go to get a knife properly reground - I've a sabatier or two that are really past the whetstone stage at this point.

    Talk to a chef in a local restaurant. There's normally a 'knife-sharpener' that calls to these places regularly to sharpen their knives professionally. It should cost about €2/knife. I've to try and contact one myself so if I get any detail I'll pass it on to you.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 109 ✭✭ Echani


    Does anyone know where to get Victorinox knives in Dublin? (city centre preferably!)

    Edit: nevermind, found an older topic :)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 717 MarcusFenix


    Deepsense wrote: »
    *groans*


    :pac:


    I love the Wurstof. I agree re the Global, stopped using them years ago. I never found the handles comfortable. I love the frimness of the grip on the Wuffys.

    I was at Catex a few weeks ago - the chef equivelent of a fairground - and there was a brand of knife Id never heard of before - Dick (I kid you not). Has anyone used these? They were like Wuffys had taken Victorinox out to dinner got plastered and had a lovechild knife :)

    Im an engineer and as far as I can remember Dick made the BEST tools ever made. So they know what they're doing with metal. As for feel etc. anybodys guess, although having said that im sure that all the research gone into making ergonomic tools probably has been employed with the knives too. Hope some of this blabber helps!:pac:


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