We have updated our Privacy Notice, you can read the updated document here
Mods please check the Moderators Group for an important update on Mod tools. If you do not have access to the group, please PM Niamh. Thanks!

Support for those quitting smoking

1192021222325»

Comments

  • #2


    Nyum Nyum wrote: »
    TEN YEARS QUIT TODAY!!
    :):):):):):):):)

    Best thing I ever did! Good luck to all those quitting too :)

    Congrats!! Great to be off them


  • #2


    I quit smoking a week ago on Sunday and for the first time ever, it’s going really well. I’m not too fussed at all about smoking and went cold turkey so nicotine free at this stage. The problem I’m having is, everyday, usually around late afternoon my throat starts to feel like it’s closing up and stays like that for the rest of the day. The first few days after quitting, this was happening but much more severe with twitching and dizziness. Now it’s just the tightness in my throat. It’s not painful and not causing me any difficulty breathing but it is extremely irritating at this stage. I’ve entertained the idea that it might be stress/anxiety but it’s like a clock everyday even when I’m relaxed. Anyone any ideas what could be causing this?


  • #2


    Emmadilema wrote: »
    I quit smoking a week ago on Sunday and for the first time ever, it’s going really well. I’m not too fussed at all about smoking and went cold turkey so nicotine free at this stage. The problem I’m having is, everyday, usually around late afternoon my throat starts to feel like it’s closing up and stays like that for the rest of the day. The first few days after quitting, this was happening but much more severe with twitching and dizziness. Now it’s just the tightness in my throat. It’s not painful and not causing me any difficulty breathing but it is extremely irritating at this stage. I’ve entertained the idea that it might be stress/anxiety but it’s like a clock everyday even when I’m relaxed. Anyone any ideas what could be causing this?

    Should probably get it checked by a doctor if it's really bothering you however I would go with the anxiety diagnosis. I had similar issues when I quit many years ago, always around 3pm for me. In hindsight I think the issue existed before I quit but I was putting down the occasional dizzy spell, tightness etc as being a result of smoking. You get much more in tune with yourself when you're not on the nicotine clock!


  • #2


    SuperS54 wrote: »
    Should probably get it checked by a doctor if it's really bothering you however I would go with the anxiety diagnosis. I had similar issues when I quit many years ago, always around 3pm for me. In hindsight I think the issue existed before I quit but I was putting down the occasional dizzy spell, tightness etc as being a result of smoking. You get much more in tune with yourself when you're not on the nicotine clock!

    Yeah I’m leaning that way myself. How long did it last for you? If it keeps up much longer I probably will see the doctor. It’s driving me bananas although not enough to make me want to smoke thank god.


  • #2


    Emmadilema wrote: »
    Yeah I’m leaning that way myself. How long did it last for you? If it keeps up much longer I probably will see the doctor. It’s driving me bananas although not enough to make me want to smoke thank god.

    It lasted until I went to the doc and got some medication to help! It may be completely disconnected from stopping smoking in the first place, take a step back and look at what else may be causing stress in your life. I assume there was some trigger that caused you to quit in the first place, although quitting in itself is a stressful change. Give it a few weeks and see your GP if it doesn't go away. If you find it doesn't happen if you are busy with some (enjoyable) task then it's likely stress related and not a physical problem.


  • #2


    Nyum Nyum wrote: »
    TEN YEARS QUIT TODAY!!
    :):):):):):):):)

    Best thing I ever did! Good luck to all those quitting too :)


    11 years now :)

    Keep going if you've quit :)


  • #2


    SuperS54 wrote: »
    Day 15, cold turkey, internet sites then followed by Allen Carr, actually far easier than I imagined it would be or it has ever been before. I think once you educate yourself and the veil is lifted it becomes much easier. Have to say I'm feeling better than I ever remember feeling in a long time, masses of energy, the return of dreams has been pleasant too!
    If you're thinking of quitting, there are a lot of resources and free pdf's on the web which you can be read at work!

    7 Years down! So, so glad I made that decision all those years ago!


  • #2


    Nyum Nyum wrote: »
    11 years now :)

    Keep going if you've quit :)


    12 years today :) Keep going! :)


  • #2


    I don't know exactly how long i have quit and tbh i don't care as it is something that for me is in the past and i don't care to give it any importance by remembering specifics about it. It's roughly 8 Months now after a near 20 year habit and my only regret is that i didn't do it sooner.

    The Alan Carr book really helped me. I was getting the odd pang for the first few months with different triggers but they passed fairly quickly and the book really helped me to build the mental fortitude to deal with them. I don't get them as much now or at least i don't notice them anymore.

    Thankfully, i am an ex-smoker and will be for the rest of my life.


  • #2


    8 years in! Forgotten all about the demon weed until Facebook reminded me of my 8 years today, absolutely do not miss them a bit.

    For anyone still thinking about it, just do it, it's so much easier than you think once you put your mind to it. The only regrets you will have are having started smoking in the first place. Prepare to realise how awful smokers smell though!


  • #2


    Ah lads day two just started and ye're putting me to shame.

    It's going a lot better than it usually does though. I'm very optimistic. I woke up this morning craving chicken. Then I remembered that I wanted to smoke and just thought about the chicken I now intend to cook later and imagined biting into the drumstick.

    I'm channelling all my energy into diet and exercise. You should have seen the assortment of food I had yesterday to distract myself. It started with the toastie for lunch which had half an avocado, a tomato, lettuce, cucumber, black pudding, hard boiled egg and rasher with a few slices of cheese and butter and mayo. That tided me over until dinner and I got back to work. By six o'clock I was already hungry enough for a huge bowl of noodles with pork and stir fry veg. But that was early days. By midnight (when I had to put a stop to the eating) I'd had popcorn, sesame sticks, two spoons of ice cream, a banana sandwich, an apple, an orange and a handful of hazelnuts.

    The shopping is coming soon and I've ordered +€100 of healthy treats so that I can pig out while I'm having these nicotine cravings for the next few days. But I think my attitude is great. Usually where I fail is that something tragic happens me. I can see where all those potential pitfalls are encroaching from and I just need to be prepared not to go back to it. I can do this.


  • #2


    Just over three years off them myself. I used the quick mist sprays. I'm just as hooked on them now, but i would never even think of smoking any more. Even when drunk or stressed.

    For anyone that's thinking of trying the spray, it's a rough first day. You can feel it burning down your throat, and it causes instant hiccups, but that passes. It can be expensive, especially if you get in a habit of just spraying because it's there, but it completely kills the crazings. Also keep a bottle of water handy with it!


  • #2


    Nyum Nyum wrote: »
    12 years today :) Keep going! :)


    13 years today :) I've never once regretted quitting. Good luck!


Society & Culture