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13-04-2021, 23:15   #46
magicbastarder
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Originally Posted by cletus View Post
It's your bike. Use whatever pedals you want. Wear whatever shoes you want. Go out and enjoy your cycle, and unless you're actually falling off the bike, don't mind anyone telling you "you're doing it wrong"
this man speaks the truth.

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14-04-2021, 13:51   #47
Darkglasses
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Originally Posted by CramCycle View Post
Nothing wrong with flats. The only time clipless are really of benefit is climbing (with effort) or sprinting, at any other time, the difference is negligible if it even exists at all.

Flats just look sh1t unless its a BMX or MTB but once you get over that hurdle, they are grand.
I have clipless on all my bikes, and on the rare occasion I use flats I find that cycling in the rain kind of sucks with them. Not having to put in any effort to make sure your feet don't slip off a flat pedal is a big plus in my opinion.
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14-04-2021, 15:11   #48
Mr. Cats
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There’s certainly nothing wrong with flats and if you’ve been commuting on road bikes for 25 years as mentioned, then you certainly should have a good idea what works well for you. Clearly whatever works for you can’t be wrong. As a few have alluded to, flats are better for commuting in many people’s opinion. I find I’m a safer cyclist commuting with flats as I don’t try to avoid clipping out/putting foot down.

I think though your question is more akin to “why do ‘road biking enthusiasts’ (leaving racing out completely) almost all use clipless pedals and why do some of them think it’s wrong to use flats”. If that’s the question then I think for the first part it’s likely that most will tell you it’s more comfortable and/or easier to apply consistent power over long distances with clipless pedals. My own view is that the fixed position is supportive and with the right set-up over time it facilitates you to build muscles needed for long distance endurance in your legs. The rigidity helps with the specialisation.

For the second part of the question, why do some think flats are wrong, I think it’s a mixture of just going along with the accepted wisdom that clipless are better over long distances and also (but more rarely in my limited experience) the snobbery about “the rules” etc. For the last group it’s best to just ignore them. Almost nobody takes this seriously and if they do it’s not your issue.

Still though, don’t be surprised if your choice would raise some eyebrows on a group ride (much like it would if you choose to wear those gaa shorts!) but almost nobody really cares so long as you are keeping pace safely.

Last edited by Mr. Cats; 14-04-2021 at 15:17.
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14-04-2021, 15:14   #49
LorenzoB
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Open toe clips with no straps are a good compromise, giving you ability to push forward and no issues clipping in and out.
What I do
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14-04-2021, 15:24   #50
youcancallmeal
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Recently bought a decent road bike as I enjoy short high intensity climbs of the hills in my locality(Up around viewpoint in South Dublin). I'd previously been doing this with a steel frame Surly cyclocross bike and I find it tough to get up to the top without stopping a couple of times. Anyway I've never used clipless pedals/shoes so I toyed with the idea of finally getting them. The bike shop fitted flat pedals for free when giving me the bike so while I was still thinking over clipless pedals/shoes I have done a few big spins with the flats. It's been several weeks now and I think I'm just going to stick with the flats. I'm not looking to get a KOM or cover long distances in as short amount of time as possible, I just enjoy cycling for fitness/weight loss so if flat pedals mean more effort then I guess that's a good thing for me. Who knows, I may still get them in future and realise what I've been missing out on all this time
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14-04-2021, 22:55   #51
byrnem31
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I started using spd last year as I bought a decent bike, defy advanced 2 2020.
I'd never go back to runners. It's better for your legs, hips etc, more power and you feel part of the bike.

I have double sided spds. I fixed the bike the other day and took it around the estate in runners. When I was coming around the corner, I put power into the bike and my foot slipped on the pedal with my runners and I nearly snapped my ankle, never again.

Anyone in runners still should give the spds a go. I can get off the bike and walk anywhere too which is good as my cycling shoes are as comfy as runners either way.
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15-04-2021, 08:08   #52
smacl
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Originally Posted by byrnem31 View Post
I started using spd last year as I bought a decent bike, defy advanced 2 2020.
I'd never go back to runners. It's better for your legs, hips etc, more power and you feel part of the bike.

I have double sided spds. I fixed the bike the other day and took it around the estate in runners. When I was coming around the corner, I put power into the bike and my foot slipped on the pedal with my runners and I nearly snapped my ankle, never again.

Anyone in runners still should give the spds a go. I can get off the bike and walk anywhere too which is good as my cycling shoes are as comfy as runners either way.
Agree with feeling more like part of the bike, not so sure about clipped in being better for your legs, hips, etc... Being able to change foot position on a long ride has its advantages much like being able change hand position on the bars. If you're using pinned pedals slipping, or even small unwanted foot movement, doesn't appear to be an issue. Longest I've done after changing from years of SPDs to flats last summer was a hilly 120k and I didn't notice much difference. Hopefully doing longer this summer.

If I was cycling exclusively on the road without much stop start for lights, I'd probably prefer clipless. Same if I was in a group trying to maximise efficiency or struggling in any way to keep pace. That doesn't really describe the larger part of my cycling so I'll stay with flats for now. Until the n+1 dedicated road only bike arrives of course
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15-04-2021, 08:43   #53
magicbastarder
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Originally Posted by byrnem31 View Post
I have double sided spds. I fixed the bike the other day and took it around the estate in runners. When I was coming around the corner, I put power into the bike and my foot slipped on the pedal with my runners and I nearly snapped my ankle, never again.
But you were wearing runners with spd pedals? Of course that's not going to end well.
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15-04-2021, 13:30   #54
byrnem31
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But you were wearing runners with spd pedals? Of course that's not going to end well.
They are double sided. Spd on one side and standard foot pedals on the the other.
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15-04-2021, 14:08   #55
Macy0161
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fwiw I doubt any one in a leisure group spin would even be looking. Use what you're most comfortable.

The longer I cycle, the "rules" like Velominati push really does damage to the perceived accessibility of the sport. And actually damages the professional sport in some ways (we must be the only sport that buying and wearing a replica jersey is a bad thing!).

My n=1, I much prefer being clipped in - it "feels" more efficient for me. On my road bike I generally use SPD-SL, but in winter the last two years I've swapped to spd, as I have spd boots for gravelling. The last few weeks, I've swapped between them on the same bike, on the same within 5km roads. I though spring had sprung, so swapped, and then we were back to winter. I really notice the bigger platform and stiffer sole on my road shoes.

It is so much less hassle to walk in recessed SPD's though! And you can buy those velosambas!

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Originally Posted by smacl View Post
I've tried combo flat/SPD pedals and they really are the worst of both worlds in my experience. Decent double sided platform SPDs like the M424 work fine as a flat pedal in anything but the thinnest sole shoes and don't leave you playing pedal roulette when you are clipping in.
That's my experience having gone on a spin on my brothers commuter with combo pedals. Trying to clip in to the flat side.

Certainly in the context of "nipping to shop", I'm fine on the top of SPD-SL's, and SPD (both platform and non-platform). You can get covers for spd-sl that clip in to the pedal to effectively make them flat too.
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15-04-2021, 15:07   #56
ex loco refugii
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Originally Posted by smacl View Post
Agree with feeling more like part of the bike, not so sure about clipped in being better for your legs, hips, etc... Being able to change foot position on a long ride has its advantages much like being able change hand position on the bars. If you're using pinned pedals slipping, or even small unwanted foot movement, doesn't appear to be an issue. Longest I've done after changing from years of SPDs to flats last summer was a hilly 120k and I didn't notice much difference. Hopefully doing longer this summer.

If I was cycling exclusively on the road without much stop start for lights, I'd probably prefer clipless. Same if I was in a group trying to maximise efficiency or struggling in any way to keep pace. That doesn't really describe the larger part of my cycling so I'll stay with flats for now. Until the n+1 dedicated road only bike arrives of course
On long rides I find the flats more comfortable for the reason you describe cause you can move around. With clipless I would think I had them set up perfectly but after 60k or so I would get uncomfortable and tight, and sometimes a "hotspot" on my foot.

Although after 6 months off the bike and the "lockdown stone" I won't be doing 60k+ for a while

Only downside I have found to the pins is that on one occasion I caught my calf somehow on them and got a bad scratch. Although I won't be winning any cyclist purest points, I wear baggy mountain biking 3/4 shorts on my road and touring bikes.

Friend of mine crashed into a ditch before and reckons if he were not clipped in he could have bailed, but I dunno how realistic leaping off a bike is tbf.
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15-04-2021, 15:11   #57
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I ride studded mtb flats on my road bike these days. A few others here do too.
How do you find them on a longer spin like say 70-100km?

I have dual sided pedals from shimano, flat one side and clipless the other.

The flats have pins alright but I wouldn’t say they’re the grippiest. They’re good but I they’re not a patch on clipless.

Great for going to the shop etc without having to change the pedals though as the odd bit off roading where I don’t trust being clipless.
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15-04-2021, 15:47   #58
magicbastarder
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Originally Posted by Macy0161 View Post
The longer I cycle, the "rules" like Velominati push really does damage to the perceived accessibility of the sport.
anyone who takes 'the rules' as anything other than a bit of fun is probably going to be insufferable anyway, regardless of 'the rules'
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16-04-2021, 07:22   #59
CramCycle
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Originally Posted by Macy0161 View Post
The longer I cycle, the "rules" like Velominati push really does damage to the perceived accessibility of the sport. And actually damages the professional sport in some ways (we must be the only sport that buying and wearing a replica jersey is a bad thing!).
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Originally Posted by magicbastarder View Post
anyone who takes 'the rules' as anything other than a bit of fun is probably going to be insufferable anyway, regardless of 'the rules'
Funny thing is some people take them very seriously. I read an interview with the guy who maintains the website (someone linked from this forum). He actually came across quite well, it is all a bit of fun seemed to be his view on it.
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16-04-2021, 07:33   #60
cletus
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I always* got the impression that the rules were more serious than not, or at the very least, they were a joke created off the back of something much more serious.

Like, even though they overstate the fact, they're based around the idea that people out cycling bikes genuinely think like that.


*Always being the last two or so years since I was made aware of the bloody things

Last edited by cletus; 16-04-2021 at 07:37.
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