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13-08-2020, 17:09   #1
mr_fegelien
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Will Ireland ever reach temps of 30°C+ like continental Europe?

With the 2010s being announced as the hottest decade since records began, it seems climate change really is warming the earth.

Despite that, I don't think I've ever seen any city in Ireland get above 25°C. Will we see hot scorching temps like continental Europe experiences in the next 20-40 years?
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13-08-2020, 17:38   #2
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With the 2010s being announced as the hottest decade since records began, it seems climate change really is warming the earth.

Despite that, I don't think I've ever seen any city in Ireland get above 25°C. Will we see hot scorching temps like continental Europe experiences in the next 20-40 years?
Surely you mean 30º and not 25º?

Some places are at 25º right now.
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13-08-2020, 17:46   #3
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My heating is on a thermostat, set to 20°C for the evenings and mornings and I don't usually bother turning it off due to the season. The heating has come on more this 'summer', than any I can recall in any previous summer, so this record heating must be elsewhere.

I doubt Ireland will ever regularly get days exceeding 30°. If there are any, they will be one or two days in a year at most.
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13-08-2020, 17:50   #4
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Originally Posted by mr_fegelien View Post
With the 2010s being announced as the hottest decade since records began, it seems climate change really is warming the earth.

Despite that, I don't think I've ever seen any city in Ireland get above 25°C. Will we see hot scorching temps like continental Europe experiences in the next 20-40 years?
Yes, absolutely - by 2040 Dublin will have average July maximums of 33°c to 36°c and out past the then suburbs the Curragh will see it's sheep replaced with camels as it becomes a desert.

Children just won't know what snow looks like anymore either.

Seriously, all this prediction stuff is akin to the horoscopes

By the way, every city on this island has recorded well above 25°c hundreds of times.
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13-08-2020, 17:54   #5
beauf
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Originally Posted by mr_fegelien View Post
With the 2010s being announced as the hottest decade since records began, it seems climate change really is warming the earth.

Despite that, I don't think I've ever seen any city in Ireland get above 25°C. Will we see hot scorching temps like continental Europe experiences in the next 20-40 years?
https://www.joe.ie/news/hottest-temp...ireland-631172


I thought I saw 29 in the car in Dublin a couple of years back.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/envi...blin-1.3128089

Last edited by beauf; 13-08-2020 at 17:59.
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13-08-2020, 20:52   #6
JCX BXC
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Shannon airport recorded 32°c in June 2018.

Kilkenny Castle holds the Irish record of 33.3°c in 1887.

30°c is seen every few summers in Ireland.
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13-08-2020, 20:54   #7
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Hopefully not. Anywhere above 27° and I have to run from shade to shade before I go on fire.
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13-08-2020, 21:02   #8
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The answer to yes as it's not unusual. However the cities on the continent will always be warmer due to heat soak of large body of land. The south of England is close enough for that heat to leak across the Channel whereas we've got over 300 Kms of water between France and us.
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13-08-2020, 21:24   #9
Popoutman
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Hopefully not. Anywhere above 27° and I have to run from shade to shade before I go on fire.
Usually the hot days are humid here. Dry mid-30s is pleasant, and possible to do lots of things even cycling and jogging, as sweating works. Go to 90% humidity at 30 degrees and it's hell on earth
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13-08-2020, 21:49   #10
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The mr_fegelien bot has found the weather forums. its a sad day
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13-08-2020, 23:02   #11
Gaoth Laidir
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Usually the hot days are humid here. Dry mid-30s is pleasant, and possible to do lots of things even cycling and jogging, as sweating works. Go to 90% humidity at 30 degrees and it's hell on earth
Almost nowhere on earth gets 90% r.h. at 30 °C, except for maybe the Gulf states, Singapore, etc. That would mean a dewpoint of 28.2 °C, which is impossible in most parts of the world, not least of all Ireland. At the hottest time of the day the r.h. is normally at its lowest, and vice versa.
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13-08-2020, 23:18   #12
beauf
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I've been in high humidity in the States East coast, you have a shower dry off then are immediately drenched again. Very draining. Dry heat like on the west coast is far more pleasant.

Cars don't rust either...
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13-08-2020, 23:25   #13
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The mr_fegelien bot has found the weather forums. its a sad day

Yeah. About time I put them on ignore tbh.
Literally every forum there's some boring BS thread by them. Whataboutery galore.
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14-08-2020, 00:06   #14
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Yes, absolutely - by 2040 Dublin will have average July maximums of 33°c to 36°c and out past the then suburbs the Curragh will see it's sheep replaced with camels as it becomes a desert.

Children just won't know what snow looks like anymore either.

Seriously, all this prediction stuff is akin to the horoscopes

By the way, every city on this island has recorded well above 25°c hundreds of times.
The period of time when the Earth was so warm there were no ice caps, is longer than the period of time when it has had them. The current average global temperature is among the lowest the planet has seen, at around 14° C. When it doesn't have icecaps, and the average global temperature is 20-26° C, it's much closer to the 28° C ideal temperature for photosynthesis to take place and life flourishes. Current CO2 levels are low too.
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14-08-2020, 00:19   #15
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Ireland does reach 30C-32C on rare ocassions during some summer, but even when we do most places are still in the mid to high twenties. Temperatures of 30C and above are usually very localised and depend greatly on the direction of the wind and a direct hit from a perfect plume or sustained spell of high pressure mid summer with gentle south-easterly breezes.

Dublin has a very difficult time getting above 21C in May even during decent warm spells as those spells usually have an easterly component to them and even the smallest sea breeze can lower Dublin's temperature by 4 or 5C compared to western areas due to that chilly Irish sea. By June Dublin can start to warm up if conditions are perfect and up to 25 or 26 is possible. July and August Dublin can get to 28 or maybe 29C during the perfect but rare direct hit summer plume but even then any easterly would still shave a degree or two off the maximum potential.

Cork and Waterford would be similar to Dublin in that any sort of southerly breeze or even south-easterly would bring lower temperatures there off a fairly chilly sea.

Limerick is in a better position, due to it's westerly location as the majority of our warm spells have an easterly component to them. The nearby town of Shannon is often the hottest place in the country if those temperature records from Shannon are totally accurate. As mentioned above Shannon recorded 32C during the 2018 heatwave while most other places were still in the 20s.

Galway can get very warm too during summer warmer spells, they can do particularly well from those May and June warm spells while eastern areas can be substantially cooler at that time of the year due to the Irish sea breezes.

It is frustrating that most countries around Europe including the Uk seem to break heat records regularly over recent times while Ireland does not appear to do. Most warm spells here are not direct hits and instead we get side swiped or the Atlantic takes over just as the warm air arrives.

Our island's land area is just not big enough to regularly reach 30C or more over a wider area. We are surrounded by the cool and vast Atlantic ocean to our west, north and perhaps to our south too which then joins up with the Bay of Biscay. We do not tap into hot southerlies like the UK can as we have close to 1000km of water to our south while they have less than 40km between them in France across the south-east.

We depend on that perfectly aligned windflow from a direct hit plume going from central Europe across the channel to the Uk and then across to Ireland from wales and southern England. That sort of sea track is no more than 150km in total but they need to happen preferably in mid July or August to weaken the temperature cooldown from the Irish sea.

I don't see our all time and ancient temperature record of 33C being broken any time soon or indeed in my lifetime. In order to do so we would probably need several days of sustained 20C+ uppers across the country with unbroken gin blue skies and very light winds and I am not sure this is even possible in this country.
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