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06-02-2013, 15:04   #16
jos28
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Hi emk,
I've sent you an email
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12-02-2013, 00:59   #17
 
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Soldiers houses:

Oldcourt park, bray (locally known as soldiers rd)
Luckybrook road, glenealy
Rocky road, wicklow town,
Avondale main gate, rathdrum

There seems to be two distinct styles in the area, one detached and slightly larger, and then pairs of semis. Theres examples of the detached style on oldcourt park and at avondale gates. Been very curious about these for years and how they were allocated. Theres some unrecognisable, but some are very original but beautiful external ironware and lovely banisters. I know of one with original windows and beautiful turned iron window latches.
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13-02-2013, 00:38   #18
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Houses for heroes

I've heard that the houses on Peck's Lane in Castleknock were for returned WW1 soldiers also. Some of my family members who had served were given houses there and elsewhere in the area. I will try to find out more information and post it here.
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13-02-2013, 21:38   #19
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Yep, the houses in Wicklow and Castleknock were built by the Irish Soldiers and Sailors Land Trust. The Trust built nearly 3000 houses throughout the State for soldiers returning from WWl.
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14-02-2013, 14:18   #20
 
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Yep, the houses in Wicklow and Castleknock were built by the Irish Soldiers and Sailors Land Trust. The Trust built nearly 3000 houses throughout the State for soldiers returning from WWl.
Would you know if the houses in castleknock are in the same style as the ones scattered around wicklow?

Also the two styles, mostly pairs of semis but the occasional double fronted detached (strangely about the same sq footage as each other) Were they allocated according to rank or honour?
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14-02-2013, 18:06   #21
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I focused mainly on the Killester houses which represented the largest development built by the Trust. There were 3 sizes of houses which were allocated according to rank. The largest houses were in Demesne and were given to officers and their families. I would imagine that the same rule applied elsewhere. The Trust built different styles of houses in various places.

Here is an extract from an article by Fred Aalen where Castleknock is mentioned:

Significant developments, with between 40 to 80 houses in each, were built on the outskirts of Dublin at Cabra (1932-34), Glasnevin (1928-31), Milltown (1928-31), Ballinteer (1931-32), Kimmage (1931-33) and Sandymount (1923) 43 Numerous smaller developments were built, for example at Library Road, Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) (Fig. 2c), Sallynoggin, Castleknock, Dundrum, Palmerstown, Clontarf, Raheny and Drimnagh. There is considerable variety of house styles between and within these developments and in the way they are laid out. Milltown, forexample, has short terraces of two-storey brick houses, arranged mainly in subdued crescents on the roadside (Fig. 3a); Sallynoggin has mainly single-storey terrace dwellings with picturesque bay windows, colourful, orange roof-tiles and doors framed by wide, sloping pilasters (identical houses were built at Athy, County Kildare); Castleknock has semi-detached, single-storey and two-storey houses, while Ballinteer has cottages of varied designs, but mainly short terraces similar to those at Milltown, arranged on a secluded road and a nearby cul-de-sac (Fig. 3b)
and linked with a small colony of local authority labourers' cottages.

Drop me a PM if you would like me to email that article to you.
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19-05-2013, 17:25   #22
mairin26
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Hi jos28,
I've just come accross this thread.
I am starting to do some family research and my great-grandparents raised their family in Killester. My great-grandfather was an ex-serviceman but I don't have any details of how they came to live there.

I would love to know how the houses in Killester were allocated - was it by a draw or something? I read somewhere that there were thousands of applicants for the 300 houses built.

Any information would be great, thanks.
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20-05-2013, 18:00   #23
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Hi Mairin,
Returning soldiers had to apply to the Local Government Board for a house. There didn't seem to any strict criteria, just ex-servicemen of sound character who had families to support. The first residents moved in in 1923, many of the returning soldiers worked on the Killester site as labourers, physically building the houses they were going to live in. The Irish Sailors and Soldiers Land Trust took over in January 1924 and then men had to apply directly to the Trust for housing.
PM sent.
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20-05-2013, 22:50   #24
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This might be of interest to anyone with Killester connections. It is from British Pathe newsreels and shows Remembrance Day 1923 in Killester. There are other clips there too, one featuring the laying of the foundation stone for St Brigid's Church in 1925

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/re...uery/killester

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/ar...uery/killester

There a few clips, all well worth a look
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28-06-2013, 17:27   #25
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Killester Houses.

Get over to Resource centre next door to Killester Church to-morrow as it is the last day of a week long exhibition covering WW1 and has some fantastic photos and info on the ex servicemens houses that were built there in the 1920s as well as lots of history of the parish.
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30-06-2013, 20:25   #26
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Cheers Hotd, I was there last week and it was a brilliant exhibition. Well done to all involved.
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14-07-2013, 20:29   #27
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Get over to Resource centre next door to Killester Church to-morrow as it is the last day of a week long exhibition covering WW1 and has some fantastic photos and info on the ex servicemens houses that were built there in the 1920s as well as lots of history of the parish.
Looking for any photographs of houses in all parts of Ireland
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14-07-2013, 20:31   #28
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Get over to Resource centre next door to Killester Church to-morrow as it is the last day of a week long exhibition covering WW1 and has some fantastic photos and info on the ex servicemens houses that were built there in the 1920s as well as lots of history of the parish.
I was one of the people involved in the exhibition. Thank you for your comments.
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16-07-2013, 03:36   #29
 
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Looking for any photographs of houses in all parts of Ireland
I'll take pictures in Rathdrum, Glenealy, Wicklow and Bray, but they are all built in the same style (with the exception of the two detached in Bray and one in rathdrum) if you want.

Would love to compare with the style of the rest. Still curious as to the detached houses; two bedroom and similar square footage to the semis; it's like they were built for the offices in charge?
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16-07-2013, 20:59   #30
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Andy,
There appeared to be a practice of the Irish Soldiers and Sailors Land Trust building different style houses for different ranks. For example, in Killester there were 3 types of housing: the largest ones in Demesne were reserved for officers, Middle Third went to the middle ranks and Abbeyfield was reserved for the ordinary ranking soldiers and their families. As the years went by and families got bigger, people did move to the bigger houses within the estate.
Anyone interested in this topic should check out
Fraser, M. 1996. John Bull’s Other Homes, State Housing and British Policy in Ireland 1883-1922. Liverpool.
If anyone wants a copy of another interesting article by Fred Aalen (whos goes into detail about the actual building) or if anyone wants a link to my thesis just drop me a pm.
In the meantime I will try and post a couple of photos that I got from the ISSLT Annual Reports.
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