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17-09-2019, 21:34   #16
Cass
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My guns fall into Category A and B. They are tools, but i'm fairly pissed if i damage or scratch them.

No harm to with being proud about your firearms, regardless of cost. Doesn't mean i shy away from any work that needs done or taking tools to them, but from my little CZ to the most expensive one i have, they are cleaned, minded and stored carefully and treated the same when i'm out.

To me it's like a car. It's a toll to get me from point A to point B, but if it gets scratched i get pissed.
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18-09-2019, 08:46   #17
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Me - “B” if B means mind them and not let them get damaged...but then i only have 1 and a half guns :-) (second one is just about on an import licence-) both are pistols and are used for competition and target practice only....

Number one has got wear in the blued part...which after 3 or 4 years is to be expected. But it annoys me.

I did have a .22 rifle once...couldn’t give a toss about it - held no interest for me...i did mind it though.....i dropped my DeWalt drill last week and nearly had a con-nip-sion!!
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18-09-2019, 11:26   #18
SakoHunter75
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Quote:
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It should it mounted properly. The scope is attached to the barreled action, not the stock so technically you could take the stock off, clamp the barreled action with scope still attached and still shoot just fine.

That's what I would have thought, but at the same time at the back of mind there was the thought that if the screws clamping the stock to the action were torqued differently it could (theoretically?) somehow alter the zero very slightly.


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My guns fall into Category A and B. They are tools, but i'm fairly pissed if i damage or scratch them.

No harm to with being proud about your firearms, regardless of cost. Doesn't mean i shy away from any work that needs done or taking tools to them, but from my little CZ to the most expensive one i have, they are cleaned, minded and stored carefully and treated the same when i'm out.

To me it's like a car. It's a toll to get me from point A to point B, but if it gets scratched i get pissed.

This describes totally my approach to my rifles. Don't care so much about the car though!
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18-09-2019, 15:51   #19
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....... at the back of mind there was the thought that if the screws clamping the stock to the action were torqued differently it could (theoretically?) somehow alter the zero very slightly.
It is always best practice when removing and replacing a stock to torque to the same setting each time. Removes any further doubt.

Its also helpful if you have it bedded be that via glass bedding, pillar, bedding block, etc.
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18-09-2019, 18:42   #20
SakoHunter75
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It is always best practice when removing and replacing a stock to torque to the same setting each time. Removes any further doubt.

Its also helpful if you have it bedded be that via glass bedding, pillar, bedding block, etc.
Do you use a tool with actual torque settings? I've never gotten around to investing in one of those yet.
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21-09-2019, 22:27   #21
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Apologies, i missed this reply.

Yes a Torgue wrench is the best bet. Its the only way to tighten the action screws to a known setting for repeatable results.

If your out and need to remove the stock for any reason a simple, yet somewhat inaccurate, way would be to mark the action screw and stock in a single line (using a pencil or similar). Undo the action screw counting the full revolutions. Do this for all the action screws. When replacing the stock simply turn to the recorded number of turns and make sure the line of the screw and the line on the stock you drew earlier line up.

Won't be too far off if at all, but not as precise as a torque wrench.

Also be on the look out for the right wrench. They come in two variables (for firearms). ft/lb and Inch/lb. Ft/lb for the heavier screws and in/lb for the finer/more sensitive jobs (ring screws, etc).
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22-09-2019, 16:10   #22
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Cheers for the reply Cass
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