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03-11-2018, 01:13   #751
slowburner
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Originally Posted by Aelfric View Post
At least three of these lithics are diagnostically late Mesolithic, so you should report the finds, and their location, to the Duty Officer at the National Museum of Ireland if you haven't done so already.
What late Mesolithic diagnostic features do you see?
I’m seeing maybe silicified limestone but definitely not chert.
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04-11-2018, 10:12   #752
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@slowburner. Yes, I suspected you might. My collection is available whenever a study is done of the area.
It is not your collection, it is the property of the state and Boards.ie shouldn't be encouraging individuals to gather and retain archaeological objects, it is against the law.

Section 23 of the National Monuments Act

23.—(1) Every person who finds any archaeological object shall within fourteen days after he has found such object, make a report of such finding to a member of the Gárda Síochána on duty in the district in which such object was so found or the Keeper of Irish Antiquities in the National Museum and shall when making such report state his own name and address, the nature or character of the said object and the time and place at which and the circumstances in which it was found by him, and shall also, and whether he has or has not made such report as aforesaid, and irrespective of the person to whom he has made such report (if any) give to any member of the Gárda Síochána or to the said Keeper on request any information within his knowledge in relation to such object or the finding thereof and shall permit any member of the Gárda Síochána or the said Keeper to inspect, examine or photograph such object.

(2) Every person who finds an archaeological object and—

(a) fails without reasonable excuse to make a report of such finding in accordance with this section, or

(b) makes under this section a report of such finding which is to his knowledge false or misleading in any material respect, or

(c) in contravention of this section fails or refuses to give to a member of the Gárda Síochána or the Keeper of Irish Antiquities in the National Museum information in relation to such archaeological object or the finding thereof, or

(d) gives to a member of the Gárda Síochána or the said Keeper information in relation to such archaeological object or the finding thereof which is to his knowledge false or misleading in a material respect.

shall be guilty of an offence under this section and shall be liable on summary conviction thereof to a fine not exceeding ten pounds.
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04-11-2018, 10:40   #753
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shall be guilty of an offence under this section and shall be liable on summary conviction thereof to a fine not exceeding ten pounds.
One presumes there's an updated version of that as we haven't used pounds/punts in a while.
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04-11-2018, 11:49   #754
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It is not your collection, it is the property of the state and Boards.ie shouldn't be encouraging individuals to gather and retain archaeological objects, it is against the law.
This forum most certainly does not 'encourage individuals to gather and retain archaeological objects'.
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04-11-2018, 12:29   #755
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One presumes there's an updated version of that as we haven't used pounds/punts in a while.
Yes there are updated amendments; primarily the 2004 amendment.

Mocmo is correct. These finds should be notified to the museum.
I am sure that anyone who posts up here about what they have found is also the kind of person who will uphold the law.

This is a unique site where hundreds, perhaps even thousands of archaeological objects have been brought to the surface by natural forces.
A number of people have made significant discoveries and a number of people have made significant collections.
As far as I know, there has been no deliberate malice or commercial intent in making these collections and I am reasonably sure that there has been no disturbance of stratigraphy (metal is a different story, sadly).

I was involved in a project here some years ago to identify the types of lithics, their period (based on morphology and typology) and their distribution around the site. If people are wandering along picking up significant quantities of objects, then any information that distribution can give is lost. That information could be critical. It could inform us about where people lived, what they were doing, how they did it. Concentrations of finds in a site like this can tell us a great deal and it is a worry that this information is being lost when collectors pick up objects without detailed and accurate recording of the circumstances in which they were found.

Random personal collections are meaningless. They tell us nothing about the people who inhabited these lands if they are held in disparate locations.
They really need to go to one central collection where they can be conserved and made available for study by scholars and students alike. That location is the National Museum and that is the reason for the law.
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04-11-2018, 14:39   #756
Coles
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In posting these images I was attempting to determine if they are 'archaeological artifacts' and I appreciate the opinion of people in determining if they are, and any further information they might have on them. I am well aware of the law but not every stone found lying on the ground is an 'archaeological artifact' and the first step should be to identify them.

My son has found a number of these stones and I certainly prefer keeping them safe than telling him to throw them away. This collection of stones is available to archaeologists to have whenever the location is studied.

These are surface field finds. The area where these stones were found is suffering from severe erosion that is destroying the stratigraphy over a very significant area and to a great depth. The soil has been completely eroded away and any lithics that it might have contained have been scattered. Archaeologists (and the National Museum) have been aware of it for years and it's not for me to say whether or not it warrants further investigation.

Returning to the stones themselves, I would agree that they probably are silicified limestone. Does anyone have any information on where the sources for that stone was? Or was it mostly from glacial eratics? I had thought one of them might be Derravarragh Chert, but not based on any particular expertise. Lithotheque will be a great resource when it covers more of the country.

Thank for all replies and I can assure you that the National Museum will be made aware of them (as they have been in the past).
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05-11-2018, 15:17   #757
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Folks anyone any idea what this could be?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_2915.JPG (1.94 MB, 114 views)
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06-11-2018, 10:15   #758
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Could be an architectural fragment - part of a decorative doorway, fireplace surround, or a window reveal - something like that. Could be part of a headstone too, I guess.

It looks to my eye as if the basic knot interlace was re-carved over an earlier design. See the remains of arcs or spirals visible to the right.
Curious.

The fragment appears to have been mortared in to the wall quite recently. Could you ask the occupants where it came from?
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13-11-2018, 09:42   #759
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While they still need the confirmation from the experts it's likely that this blade is Derravaragh Chert and dates from 4000-4200 BC. The source of this rock was well over 100km away from where it was found. All these stones are now with the National Museum.
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13-11-2018, 10:10   #760
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Nice one Coles. Hopefully these artefacts will be studied and can add to the corpus of other late Mesolithic finds from around the country.
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13-11-2018, 17:37   #761
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Roadworks on a street in Mullingar uncovered these. Guy who sent me the pic reckons they're old cobblestones. Not sure myself. What do ye think?



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13-11-2018, 18:43   #762
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[quote="Standman;108618131"]Roadworks on a street in Mullingar uncovered these. Guy who sent me the pic reckons they're old cobblestones. Not sure myself. What do ye think?


Yes, old cobblestones. I found some several years ago when I was monitoring drainage there
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13-11-2018, 19:17   #763
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Roadworks on a street in Mullingar uncovered these. Guy who sent me the pic reckons they're old cobblestones. Not sure myself. What do ye think?



You still see similar drains at the side of some rural roads.
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14-11-2018, 09:38   #764
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That's interesting.

So it's some kind of drain as opposed to a path, is it?

Any idea how old that would be?
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14-11-2018, 12:28   #765
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That's interesting.

So it's some kind of drain as opposed to a path, is it?

Any idea how old that would be?
Very difficult to say how old it is.
An archaeologist should really be monitoring these works under section 14A of the 2004 National Monuments (Amendments) Act...if there isn't one there already.
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