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Getting the best from your practice session.

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4,420 ✭✭✭ Rigsby


    I came across this article and thought it was interesting as well as useful. Often, on different forums I come across people asking what is the most efficient and beneficial way to practice.

    This (longish) article goes a long way to address this question :

    http://www.dickhensold.com/playfaster.html


Comments



  • That was an interesting read. Alot of it e.g. slow practice is stuff I hear all the time and recommend myself, and it's great to see someone advocating using the metronome- some people tell me they think it takes the 'musicality' out of their playing :confused: I haven't tried dotting both ways though, must have a go next time!




  • rhapsody wrote: »
    and it's great to see someone advocating using the metronome- some people tell me they think it takes the 'musicality' out of their playing :confused:

    Yeah, there have been heated debates on other forums about using or not using the metronome. My own opinion is that metronomes are a useful tool to calibrate your own natural sense of rhythm. Used now and then, they are helpful but should not be permanently relied upon.




  • yep I agree. It can be useful to play a piece/ movement etc with the metronome but of course when playing without it, it shouldn't sound too fixed. I've been practicing with one recently, and my teacher mentioned in my last lesson that it shows. Apart from that, I find it useful for measuring progress, creating a concrete goal to work towards e.g. scales to be played at a certain speed etc.




  • I practice no more than 30 mins per day; 10mins scales & arps, 10mins reading, and 10mins working out a piece.




  • I practice no more than 30 mins per day; 10mins scales & arps, 10mins reading, and 10mins working out a piece.

    I think regularity is more important than actual time, as is the actual practice itself. Something like your list above, would be very constructive. A half an hour a day every day is better than four/five hours once a week.

    The iconic jazz saxophonist John Coltrane practiced for fifteen hours every day. Used to take the instrument to the bathroom and to bed with him. :pac:


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  • I generally practise at least an hour a day. Sometimes I can end up practising for 2 or 3 if I'm not working and if the OH isn't at home (half an hour of the accordion is more than plenty for her :D). Admittedly I rarely play scales, I just end up working on pieces for most of it.


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