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Obsolete words that shouldn't be

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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,646 ✭✭✭ nompere


    Yakuza wrote: »


    Gustatory is still around as a fairly formal term for things related to the sense of taste.

    As is gusto, from the same latin root.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,214 ✭✭ Bloody*Mary


    Pat Kenny on RTE R1 used the word 'spry' in connection with the condition of the England Rugby team after their game against Scotland.

    poor Des Cahill hadn't a breeze what it meant.

    Haven't heard it myself for a while.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,091 ✭✭✭✭ P. Breathnach


    I don't think Des was unaware of the meaning of the word. His response to Pat was the radio equivalent of a raised eyebrow.

    I'd share Des's reaction. Spry was an odd choice of word in that context. Herself, whose interest in rugby is limited, remarked to me that she would never think of a rugby team (before, during, or after a match) as spry. Some individual players, Peter Stringer being the example who came to mind, might be so described.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,887 ✭✭✭✭ Roger_007


    The word 'froninst' was used in the Louth/Monaghan area years ago. It means 'in front of'


  • Registered Users Posts: 155 ✭✭ leedslad


    Anyone else use the term "It's the same difference" (West Donegal)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,684 ✭✭✭✭ Earthhorse


    Yup.

    Oh, South Dublin for the record. :)


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators Posts: 32,858 Mod ✭✭✭✭ pickarooney


    Yes. South East, but have heard it all over Ireland and abroad.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,214 ✭✭ Bloody*Mary


    I don't think Des was unaware of the meaning of the word. His response to Pat was the radio equivalent of a raised eyebrow.

    I'd share Des's reaction. Spry was an odd choice of word in that context. Herself, whose interest in rugby is limited, remarked to me that she would never think of a rugby team (before, during, or after a match) as spry. Some individual players, Peter Stringer being the example who came to mind, might be so described.

    I wouldn't agree with you at all on that.

    I would say it was an excellent choice.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,214 ✭✭ Bloody*Mary


    Roger_007 wrote: »
    The word 'froninst' was used in the Louth/Monaghan area years ago. It means 'in front of'

    Similar one is 'Fornense' not sure of the spelling, Wicklow Wexford area.

    Maybe we have just a spelling issue here.

    Anyone in the Sth Wicklow Wexford area help.?


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,391 ✭✭✭✭ Skerries


    I'm flabbergasted and bamboozled by the amount of hokey words on here, but I'm sure they are all cromulent


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  • Registered Users Posts: 12,091 ✭✭✭✭ P. Breathnach


    I wouldn't agree with you at all on that....
    At least one of us is wrong.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,214 ✭✭ Bloody*Mary


    At least one of us is wrong.

    :confused:

    Not necessarily , just different views on an event.

    Cahill hadn't a clue,hence the silence while he thinks of some response.


  • Registered Users Posts: 160 ✭✭ simon0brien


    That's wicked :) I think that's a lovely word..


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,371 ✭✭✭ Boulevardier


    The canteen where I work has signs forbidding people to remove delph from the canteen area.

    Delph is another word for crockery. It would be considered a bit quaint in the UK, but seems to be in common use in Ireland.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 tac foley


    The canteen where I work has signs forbidding people to remove delph from the canteen area.

    Delph is another word for crockery. It would be considered a bit quaint in the UK, but seems to be in common use in Ireland.

    Ah, surely you mean 'Delft'? The town in The Netherlands where pottery and cockery has been made for hundreds of years?

    And yes, it would be nigh-on incomprehensble to most folks here on mainland UK.

    tac


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 tac foley


    Pat Kenny on RTE R1 used the word 'spry' in connection with the condition of the England Rugby team after their game against Scotland.

    poor Des Cahill hadn't a breeze what it meant.

    Haven't heard it myself for a while.


    'Spry' is usually applied to the liveliness that can be displayed by older people, not youngsters. You can be a 'spry old git' - a grudgingly admiring term for an old man who can show a turn of speed on a fell run.

    Here on the big island, 'Spry' was the brand-name of a cooking fat.

    tac


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators Posts: 32,858 Mod ✭✭✭✭ pickarooney


    Every day can be a fry-day when you fry with crisp, tch-tch, 'n' dry.

    Delft is commonly spelt 'delph' (small d) in English.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators Posts: 32,858 Mod ✭✭✭✭ pickarooney


    Every day can be a fry-day when you fry with crisp, tch-tch, 'n' dry.

    Delft is commonly spelt 'delph' (small d) in English.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,371 ✭✭✭ Boulevardier


    Yes, delph is derived from Delft, but delph is the word as spelt and used here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 651 Condatis


    endacl wrote: »
    We definitely should still be using the correct terms for the subdivisions on the imperial side of a ruler. The world would be a jollier place entirely if people still referred to the barleycorn (third of an inch), and the poppyseed (quarter of a barleycorn).

    On a side note, thanks OP. Never thought I'd have the opportunity to drop these ones into a conversation!

    On a similar tack few of today's Graphic Design graduates know what I mean by "move that heading two ems to the left" or the meaning em dash or en dash.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,595 MathsManiac


    Condatis wrote: »
    On a similar tack few of today's Graphic Design graduates know what I mean by "move that heading two ems to the left" or the meaning em dash or en dash.

    Hmmm. Is it that graphic design courses no longer include modules on typography, or do typography modules no longer refer to these measures?

    Next you'll be telling me that they don't know what leading is. :eek:


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