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Anomalocaris' eyes reveal excellent eyesight

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    I never ever believed it was a plankton feeder, but I am often totally wrong, and kept my mouth shut.

    Thanks for that post Adam, good depiction of it too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 128 ✭✭ Allosaur


    I never did. Who thought it ate plankton?


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    It has been suggested that Anomalocaris' teeth were too weak to take in hard bodied prey. I'm not sure anyone went so far to say it was a plankton eater though.
    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056079460


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Galvasean wrote: »
    It has been suggested that Anomalocaris' teeth were too weak to take in hard bodied prey. I'm not sure anyone went so far to say it was a plankton eater though.
    http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2056079460

    I'm pretty sure it was suggested at one point, with someone suggesting that the grasping appendages would function like a manta ray's cephalic "horns" while feeding.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,747 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean


    That's an odd one. The seem awfully dexterous for that purpose.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,551 Rubecula


    To me the appendages look like they act like a primitive 'mask' as seen in dragon fly young. As I said earlier I am usually wrong but that thing always looked like a pretty fearsome marine predator to me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 128 ✭✭ Allosaur


    They don't seem "paddle-like" enough to me to fit that theory Adam. They also seem to flex in to out, rather than twist side to side to direct water flow and food particles twords the central mouth like a rudder.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor


    Allosaur wrote: »
    They don't seem "paddle-like" enough to me to fit that theory Adam. They also seem to flex in to out, rather than twist side to side to direct water flow and food particles twords the central mouth like a rudder.

    Yeah- I am just mentioning that theory, not defending it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 128 ✭✭ Allosaur


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    Yeah- I am just mentioning that theory, not defending it.
    Didn't think so. You are too smart for that. One wonders what the filiments on the Chelicerae are for though.


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