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Learner/Newbie Sticky **All Learner/newbie/Starter Questions Go here!!****

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 142 ✭✭ Morgoth


    Couple of notes.

    The theory test is now €40.60 not €35.60 as it says on the front post (it went up by a fiver a few months ago).

    I rang the Galway motor tax office today to ask them if I had to do a theory test given that I hold a full car license. I did my theory test 9 years ago in 2002 for the category B (car). She told me that I did not need to re-do the theory test for the category A motorbike. She said all I need to present at the tax office is my full car license, two passport photos and an application form which she is posting out to me!

    It's great to save the 40 bucks (enough other bike expenditure to come!) but if this turns out to be true, I have to say, it's pretty stupid. I know next to nothing about motorbikes and there is some motorbike specific stuff on the theory test that surely I should have to know. Not to mention that it got a bit harder since 2002. We shall see. :rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 226 ✭✭ Neonjack


    I did my bike theory test a couple of weeks ago and there's a whole section of the official theory test book specifically for motorbikes. I don't understand how a car theory test done 9 years ago can qualify. Not saying she's wrong, but i agree that it doesn't seem to make much sense. Around 25% of the questions I was asked in the test itself were bike specific.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,035 ✭✭✭ gipi


    According to the RSA website....

    By law, before applying for a learner permit, candidates must complete and pass a test of their general road safety knowledge and motoring legislation. It applies to anyone applying for a first learner permit in any vehicle category.

    If you are applying for your first learner permit you must:

    Include a theory test certificate for the relevant category along with your learner-permit application, unless the certificate has already been submitted
    Present the certificate within two years of the date of issue (date of passing the test)
    Note: you will be regarded as an applicant for a first learner permit in respect of a particular vehicle category if you have not held such a licence in the preceding five years.


    This appears to contradict what you've been told, Morgoth - it will be interesting to see if you actually get your learner permit!

    As an aside, the same RSA page hasn't updated the theory test charge yet, it's still showing as €35.60!


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,399 ✭✭✭✭ maameeo


    Morgoth wrote: »
    Couple of notes.

    The theory test is now €40.60 not €35.60 as it says on the front post (it went up by a fiver a few months ago).

    I rang the Galway motor tax office today to ask them if I had to do a theory test given that I hold a full car license. I did my theory test 9 years ago in 2002 for the category B (car). She told me that I did not need to re-do the theory test for the category A motorbike. She said all I need to present at the tax office is my full car license, two passport photos and an application form which she is posting out to me!

    It's great to save the 40 bucks (enough other bike expenditure to come!) but if this turns out to be true, I have to say, it's pretty stupid. I know next to nothing about motorbikes and there is some motorbike specific stuff on the theory test that surely I should have to know. Not to mention that it got a bit harder since 2002. We shall see. :rolleyes:


    perhaps she checked your history and you had an A on your original provisional license?
    i did my theory test in nov and got my prov license and it says ive held it 5 years and its my second!! i didn not know i had an A on my first one :( could have saved money i guess!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,101 ✭✭✭ brianblaze


    Okay, so I'm thinking of getting a bike...

    Cruiser, 125cc, possibly a Virago... Something around the e800 - e1000 mark? Will I get one, in decent nick for that? It's not for alot of use, just as an alternative to buses!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 11,469 ✭✭✭✭ cantdecide


    brianblaze wrote: »
    Okay, so I'm thinking of getting a bike...

    Cruiser, 125cc, possibly a Virago... Something around the e800 - e1000 mark? Will I get one, in decent nick for that? It's not for alot of use, just as an alternative to buses!

    One of the main sentiments that you'll encounter in the biking world to a question like this is that you'll save damn all money. Biking is probably as expensive as running a car. If saving money on transport is the sole reason, you're probably better off on buses...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 36 ✭✭✭ Incorporating Haj


    Morgoth wrote: »
    Couple of notes.

    The theory test is now €40.60 not €35.60 as it says on the front post (it went up by a fiver a few months ago).

    I rang the Galway motor tax office today to ask them if I had to do a theory test given that I hold a full car license. I did my theory test 9 years ago in 2002 for the category B (car). She told me that I did not need to re-do the theory test for the category A motorbike. She said all I need to present at the tax office is my full car license, two passport photos and an application form which she is posting out to me!

    It's great to save the 40 bucks (enough other bike expenditure to come!) but if this turns out to be true, I have to say, it's pretty stupid. I know next to nothing about motorbikes and there is some motorbike specific stuff on the theory test that surely I should have to know. Not to mention that it got a bit harder since 2002. We shall see. :rolleyes:

    Any update on this Morgoth?


  • Registered Users Posts: 142 ✭✭ Morgoth


    Sorry, haven't found the time to sort it, will call in to the tax office this week and post an update.


  • Registered Users Posts: 929 ✭✭✭ Shelli2


    This is a great thread, thanks guys.

    We are looking at buying a bike to save time commuting from Glasnevin to Cherrywood everyday. We'd both hopefully like to ride the bike, (me and my boyfriend), as we work different shifts different days.

    Neither of us had a clue where to start, this thread has given some great advice about the learning and licence process.
    Now we need to start looking at bikes....and again, have no clue where to start. Makes/Models are all double dutch to me. Can anyone recommend a couple of bikes that would be good for a beginner?


  • Registered Users Posts: 142 ✭✭ Morgoth


    Got my learner permit application done this morning in the Galway tax office, without having to sit a recent theory test. However, this was because my provisional license from 2002 (obtained after I did my first and only theory test) apparently included the A / A1 category. My full car license which I've had for the last 9 years doesn't include A / A1, but because my original provisional did, I was able to apply for a learner's permit today.

    For what it's worth, I vividly remember *not* answering any motorbike questions on my original theory test, so I don't know how it snuck onto my first provisional license, or perhaps there was a glitch in the system and in fact I really should have had to sit a motorbike theory again. Also don't know if that means this is technically my second provisional for category A / A1... the lady in the office didn't mention anything about that. Don't care either way!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,035 ✭✭✭ gipi


    There probably weren't as many bike questions in the theory test in 2002 so none may have come up in the 40 selected for your test. The theory test was the same for cars/bikes at that stage. You must have ticked the A/A1 box when applying for the provisional licence itself.

    Still, it saves you having to do the IBT!!

    Does your learner permit have the code number 991 or 992 in the column to the right of the A from & to dates?

    If it's 991 then you're on a first permit and you can't take your test for 6 months.
    If it's 992 then you're on your second, and you'll have to either apply for or take the test before getting another learner permit.
    If it's 993 then you're on a third or subsequent permit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 142 ✭✭ Morgoth


    Yep you're probably right, or maybe I did get asked a motorbike Q and just aced it anyway. :)
    gipi wrote: »
    Still, it saves you having to do the IBT!!

    Really?! So IBT is only required for those who sat the theory test after last December? Jeez I was about to ring up and book, must look into this a bit more... Edit: okay, it's for someone who has taken out their first learner permit after 6th Dec 2010, simple as that. The more I read though, seems like you might as well do it anyway if you're a total bike newbie, since how much less would 16 hours of regular lessons cost and it looks like a really good intro.
    Does your learner permit have the code number 991 or 992 in the column to the right of the A from & to dates?

    It's being processed / in the post, will investigate when it arrives.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,515 ✭✭✭ arleitiss


    Hey, I got question:
    I am starting college now, and I was thinking of applying for motorbike license. I am 18. Can I get stright away license that would allow me to drive typical sports bikes such as: Yamaha, Suzuki, Bmw etc.. ?

    Also if I am 18. I have absolutely perfecty eye sight and hearing (proven and written so after tests I had). And have absolutely no health problems like deseases etc.. What would be AVERAGE insurance per year for a motorbike?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,372 ✭✭✭ RosieJoe


    arleitiss wrote: »
    Hey, I got question:
    I am starting college now, and I was thinking of applying for motorbike license. I am 18. Can I get stright away license that would allow me to drive typical sports bikes such as: Yamaha, Suzuki, Bmw etc.. ?

    Also if I am 18. I have absolutely perfecty eye sight and hearing (proven and written so after tests I had). And have absolutely no health problems like deseases etc.. What would be AVERAGE insurance per year for a motorbike?

    Have you even read this thread? Seriously, the first post relates specifically to how to get your permit, what steps you need to do and all about the IBT yet you post this muck! :eek:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,881 dceire


    Which companies provide bike insurance?

    The only ones I know of are:

    Quinn Direct
    Aon Bikecare (are they AXA?)
    Carole Nash
    Adelaide :confused:


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,372 ✭✭✭ RosieJoe


    dceire wrote: »
    Which companies provide bike insurance?

    The only ones I know of are:

    Quinn Direct
    Aon Bikecare (are they AXA?)
    Carole Nash
    Adelaide :confused:

    Yep, that's about it!

    Mind you, Eaglestar years ago used to do insurance for BMW owners. No idea why though?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,005 CorkMan


    Hey, I did my Theory Test back in late 2007 and I passed it, would I need to re-do it if I was to get a Motorbike? I got a provisional license for a standard car, I did some lessons until Feb 2008 but I did not end up getting a car.

    Also, how does a Motorbike test go? Does a person drive in a car behind you and evaluate your ride?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 440 ✭✭ eurofoxy


    CorkMan wrote: »
    Hey, I did my Theory Test back in late 2007 and I passed it, would I need to re-do it if I was to get a Motorbike? I got a provisional license for a standard car, I did some lessons until Feb 2008 but I did not end up getting a car.

    Also, how does a Motorbike test go? Does a person drive in a car behind you and evaluate your ride?

    yeah you would its a completely different category so its a new test, but then you have to do the cbt etc...

    As for the test its varies some testers will ride a bike behind you and some do it in a car there is no difference between the 2 methods...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,005 CorkMan


    It is annoying with all of this stringent testing and 16 hour courses. According to my Dad years ago you would just apply for a license, you'd get one and you could drive then.

    It would be common sense that you'd find out how to look after your motorbike, because you drive it. WTH. My Dad could teach me how to drive a motorbike anyway, he never did many tests yet he can still drive away.


  • Registered Users Posts: 480 ✭✭ Flyin Irishman


    CorkMan wrote: »
    It is annoying with all of this stringent testing and 16 hour courses. According to my Dad years ago you would just apply for a license, you'd get one and you could drive then.

    It would be common sense that you'd find out how to look after your motorbike, because you drive it. WTH. My Dad could teach me how to drive a motorbike anyway, he never did many tests yet he can still drive away.

    It can definitely be annoying, and yes, as you said, most people could find someone that could teach them how to ride a bike. But the purpose of the current licensing/training procedure is to ensure the standard of the training that people receive. Otherwise theres nothing to stop someone learning bad habits from the start from a friend, then adding their own bad habits to that before teaching all of them to another new rider a few years later, and so on

    It's definitely a huge hurdle for new riders to overcome, and will probably put alot of prospective new riders off motorbikes altogether, but unfortunately regulatory bodies will always be looking to be seen to be doing something to improve the standard of road users, and increase road safety


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 21 ✭✭✭ Dr. Astronaut


    I've moved to Ireland from Canada, and hold a full license from the province of Ontario. I'd really like to get my M license over here, just to commute to college - I'm thinking of getting a 50cc or electric scooter. I've read all the posts about licensing and I gather that if you are fully licensed for other vehicles, you needn't take the theory test before obtaining your learner's permit. Does anyone know what I would have to do to get started, beginning with only a Canadian driver's license? I'm just not sure about making the jump to an Irish license and a different vehicle class at the same time. Is it a mistake to try to learn to drive a scooter in an unfamiliar country? (I've lived here a year, but don't drive a car here). Any advice is appreciated!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,035 ✭✭✭ gipi


    Dr Astronaut,

    Your Canadian licence will only be recognised here for 12 months. You can't swap it for an Irish Licence, so when the 12 months have passed, you will have to take a theory test, apply for an Irish Learner Permit, and take the driving test.

    There's some information on converting driving licences here, including a link to the RSA who may be able to give you more information:

    http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/travel_and_recreation/motoring_1/driver_licensing/exchanging_foreign_driving_permit.html


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 21 ✭✭✭ Dr. Astronaut


    gipi wrote: »
    Dr Astronaut,

    Your Canadian licence will only be recognised here for 12 months. You can't swap it for an Irish Licence, so when the 12 months have passed, you will have to take a theory test, apply for an Irish Learner Permit, and take the driving test.

    There's some information on converting driving licences here, including a link to the RSA who may be able to give you more information:

    http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/travel_and_recreation/motoring_1/driver_licensing/exchanging_foreign_driving_permit.html


    Thanks so much! It makes sense that my license won't transfer - I drive on the wrong side of the road, after all. I suppose I'll have to really think about whether it's worth the trouble and cost to get a new license.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 21 ✭✭✭ Dr. Astronaut


    I may have missed this somewhere in the forum, but what's the story on electric scooters? Licence required? I've heard the batteries wear out after a few years - does that make them not worth the trouble? How's the power in relation to a petrol one?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,515 ✭✭✭ arleitiss


    Vehicle categories A1/A and M (motorcycles/mopeds) is not permitted to carry a passenger.
    Wait what? does that mean even when I get full license (not learners permit) no matter how long time passes I still cant carry a passenger on motorbike?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,035 ✭✭✭ gipi


    If you read the post correctly you would see the very important start to the sentence you half-copied from...
    A person who holds a learner permit in:

    Vehicle categories A1/A and M (motorcycles/mopeds) is not permitted to carry a passenger


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,515 ✭✭✭ arleitiss


    gipi wrote: »
    If you read the post correctly you would see the very important start to the sentence you half-copied from...
    oh alright, it almost made me cancel my theory test. since I thought uhh no passengers? meh dont need motorbike then.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,096 --amadeus--


    This is probably going to be (another) dumb question, but anyway.

    When stopped at traffic lights or junctions I often put both feet down. On the test is this allowed or is this the sort of thing you could fail on? Likewise what is the story with getting your feet back up again when you pull away?

    Thanks


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,035 ✭✭✭ gipi


    When I took lessons, we were shown the preferred way - left foot down, right foot on the brake. Being a shortie myself, I asked if putting both feet down when stopped was wrong - the instructor said it wasn't. He said to use my judgement, and if I felt I needed to put both feet down (e.g. on uneven ground) then do so.


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 15,863 paddy147


    Will the EU be introducing stabilizers for all new learners???


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