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Parochial Houses.

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13

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  • Registered Users Posts: 84 ✭✭Liath Luachra


    Having been in many of the priests home in my county and neighbouring ones, I can safely say the days of the bishops palace are well gone. Those that live in the large parochial houses ( are there are only a few) are living in large, poorly heated houses usually confined to one or two rooms. Lots of electric heaters about. Some are of the georgian era that need copious amounts of work - they've rarely been updated in the past 50 yrs or so. The bungalows that I've visited are basic enough, certainly no housekeepers, antique furniture etc. Any significant upgrades such as new kitchen or bathroom have always in my experience been paid for by the individual priest. Maintenance is typically paid for by the diocese. The days of priests living in luxury are long gone and even at that it was often reserved solely for the bishop/canon.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,597 ✭✭✭Yellow_Fern


    Recall that 20% of people are non Irish nationals and a another massive chunk of people are children of non residents, so that 39% figure misses out a lot. It doesnt say how many ethnic Irish get married in churches.



  • Registered Users Posts: 500 ✭✭✭HazeDoll




  • Registered Users Posts: 25,865 ✭✭✭✭Mrs OBumble


    Plenty of foreigners are Catholic though, did if anything are more likely to have church weddings.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,597 ✭✭✭Yellow_Fern


    Perhaps. I am not sure. There are more non EU migrants in Ireland now than EU migrants. The 39% only refers to Roman Catholics, not the many others forms of Christianity.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,597 ✭✭✭Yellow_Fern


    It is a massive predictor if someone is Roman Catholic or not in this country.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,963 ✭✭✭downtheroad


    How does it miss anything? Less than 2 in every 5 weddings in 2021 were not catholic. The nationality, race or ethnicity of the individuals getting married is irrelevant.

    It was 43.6% catholic weddings in 2019. 47.6% in 2018. 50.9% in 2017. 53.7% in 2016. 66% in 2011. Seems to be dropping consistently year on year.



  • Registered Users Posts: 950 ✭✭✭Nodster


    In my own semi-rural parish we have three priests living in the Parochial House (built 1910), it was converted years ago into three self contained apartments for want of a better word. Not only providing accommodation it also contains a busy parish office, the local Crosscare centre. Two of the priests returned from missionary duties. By all means they should've retired as two are 80+, the other 70+, but lack support getting younger generation priests to replace them. They serve two churches within our catchment area even though parishioner numbers have dropped over the years. All three are genuine fellas who work hard and are respected within the parish.

    I know of a well liked parish priest [old family friend] who was PP his own rural parish in Wexford and retired a around 15 years ago, he was popular and well liked and the community pulled together and built a small retirement bungalow at no cost to the diocese.


    BTW -I'm catholic but rarely attend mass who happens to work beside our church and meet them on a regular basis.



  • Registered Users Posts: 34,587 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato


    CSO figures for Ireland as a whole. Has been the case for a few years now. You might think a wedding taking place in a hotel is just the reception but often now it's the ceremony happening there as well. Much less hassle all round and no need to pay a priest to give you his insights into married life either...

    Fingal County Council are certainly not competent to be making decisions about the most important piece of infrastructure on the island. They need to stick to badly designed cycle lanes and deciding on whether Mrs Murphy can have her kitchen extension.



  • Registered Users Posts: 500 ✭✭✭HazeDoll


    But that doesn't in any way negate the statistic. Nobody asserted in this thread that a diminishing percentage of Catholics are choosing secular marriage.

    Whether the newlyweds are 'ethnically' Irish or not, or catholic or not, it's still true that over 60% of them did not have a priest officiating at their wedding. They still count as people, even if they're not catholic!

    No doubt the trend reflects a trend in the general population and the statistic goes some way to explaining why there are empty parochial houses.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 15,855 ✭✭✭✭AMKC
    Ms


    So kinda like in Father Ted then lol.

    The one in the parish I grew up in was right across from us near enough. I used to hate that. A Huge 3 story house for a priest and maybe 1 or 2 other people always seemed crazy.

    Live long and Prosper

    Peace and long life.



  • Registered Users Posts: 25,865 ✭✭✭✭Mrs OBumble


    All the nurses from the Philippines might disagree with ya there.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,626 ✭✭✭Cape Clear




  • Registered Users Posts: 2,400 ✭✭✭beachhead


    You are very correcto.But subdividing a 3 bed house could turn it into apartment.

    Dials up the post counter



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,597 ✭✭✭Yellow_Fern


    Sure. There is a massive social change but even if there was social change the percentage would decline. Ethnic Irish might be only 60% by now. I wonder how they are counted. My wedding was in a RC church last year but no state registration.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,821 ✭✭✭growleaves


    They already had huge social authority and infuence over society. Its not as if somebody flipped a switch in 1921 and re-wired the whole society. It was as Kevin O'Higgins or somebody said "the most conservative revolution in the world".

    Even many Church of Ireland members supported social conservative Catholic stances on contraception, divorce and other things, as Mary Kenny found in her research.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,725 ✭✭✭hoodie6029


    Not clearer at all. Who manages and benefits from the multi-billion euro prime property portfolio?

    The road to Hell is paved with good intentions.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,232 ✭✭✭TooTired123


    Well, what income do you imagine the dioceses gets from the parochial houses? I’ve already told you that the properties are occupied by the priests who work in the parishes. Some of them are empty. What kind of income are these houses generating? I also already explained that the priests and bishops don’t own the houses. The houses provide accommodation for them. Where would they live otherwise?



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,963 ✭✭✭downtheroad


    That makes no sense. I am "ethnic Irish", was baptised but am in no way religious, and didn't get married in a catholic church. So the fall off in numbers of catholic weddings is not down to immigration, its down to several reasons, including the dieing off of interest in the catholic church in Ireland.

    If you get married in a RC church you were noted as having a RC wedding.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,861 ✭✭✭Princess Calla


    Well you are kinda splitting hairs there.

    If there's 2 parish priests in the area a 3 bed house could easily be divided and each priest would have their own privacy.

    If the parish then reduces to 1 parish priest let the priest have full use of the house.

    I don't see the need for 2 parish priests to have a 3 bed house each.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,597 ✭✭✭Yellow_Fern


    As I said, there is a massive decline in religious practise in Ireland, but being ethnic Irish is a strong predictor of being Catholic. People have this notion that most non Irish are Poles, that is diminishingly true. So mostly social change but immigration is a factor. It is worth nothing that Catholic marriages services are absolutely overloaded. There can be a six month waiting to get a place on their marriage course which is obligatory. So though the percentage of catholic weddings is declining, the absolute number of number marriages is declining less dramatic. The other trend is civil only marriages are basically static. The Spiritualist Union of Ireland and (misnamed) Humanist Association are taking up the new growth.



  • Registered Users Posts: 34,587 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato


    Complete failure of reading comprehension on your part (and in the bishop and property thing, too)

    The term 'scuzz' which appears to have caused you so much alarm was only used, sarcastically, by HazeDoll because it was in the post they were replying to.


    BTW the 'church is the people' malarkey is the second biggest lie a priest ever uttered in my presence. It's complete baloney. The RCC never was and never will be anything approaching a democracy. The role of the people is to pay, pray and obey. They are numbers, units, to be milked like cattle.

    Fingal County Council are certainly not competent to be making decisions about the most important piece of infrastructure on the island. They need to stick to badly designed cycle lanes and deciding on whether Mrs Murphy can have her kitchen extension.



  • Registered Users Posts: 34,587 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato


    You do have to laugh when the bare facts on the massive decline in catholic practice in Ireland first are denied altogether - then admitted but explained away as "it's da immigrits", as if the, and I quote directly, "ethnic Irish" are as devout as 1950.

    A lot of people recorded as "immigrants" to Ireland were actually born here left and returned, or were born in the UK and other countries to one or both Irish parents.

    Fingal County Council are certainly not competent to be making decisions about the most important piece of infrastructure on the island. They need to stick to badly designed cycle lanes and deciding on whether Mrs Murphy can have her kitchen extension.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,725 ✭✭✭hoodie6029


    You’re still just deflecting and avoiding the question. I don’t think you’re living on this planet, my friend. Ever heard of the worker with their hand in the till?

    Ever see a priest driving a bad car? Will a retired priest ever end up living in a kip of a flat above a chipper? No.

    Irish property and corrupt payments go hand in hand, even today. Do you really think the people managing the biggest private property portfolio in the State are whiter than white?

    The road to Hell is paved with good intentions.



  • Registered Users Posts: 34,587 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato


    More to the point, they have the biggest portfolio of unused property in the state and that they sit on this in urban areas all over the country and even more particularly in Dublin, while a housing crisis has been going on for years, raises a lot of moral questions.

    They've sold some (but where does the €€€€ go?) but are sitting on much more which could provide many thousands of well-located homes for families.

    TBF the Dublin diocese has knocked down the largest church in Ireland (Cappagh/Finglas), will replace it with one 10% of the size and give the rest of the site over to elder housing, but there is much much more which could be done.

    Fingal County Council are certainly not competent to be making decisions about the most important piece of infrastructure on the island. They need to stick to badly designed cycle lanes and deciding on whether Mrs Murphy can have her kitchen extension.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,387 ✭✭✭apache


    Is this true? Is it grim?

    Because when I was growing up they had a nice handy cushy number and were well looked after by the community. Have things taken such a turnaround? I can imagine things are not as good now but poor heating etc....really?



  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    I didn’t experience any issues. There’s a website with hundreds of celebrants and all wedding venues provide a ceremony room .



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,604 ✭✭✭✭Jim_Hodge


    The one nearest us is riddled with damp and mould. Only a couple of rooms are habitable. Heating stem is useless, windows are rotting and the whole place needs a huge refurbishment. The priest lives alone and doesn't have a housekeeper.



  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]




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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,387 ✭✭✭apache


    I don't expect them to have housekeepers nowadays. I'm just looking for more peoples experiences on this. That's two posters now that said that living conditions are bad. I wonder what the living conditions are really like. Are your examples the norm or not?



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